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Full text of "Town Report"



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY. MASS 



4864 00178 7380 




Hmcoln public Htbrarp 

January 1978 




Lincoln, Massachusetts: 

Annual Report, 1974 



■b 



Z^'03 



REPORT 

of the 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE YEAR 1974 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



Cover desiqn - Represents the siqn 

marking the Hartwell Tavern, 
Credit is due the Lexington 
Historical Society for pre- 
serving the sign and the 
Minute Man National Park 
for photographing it. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



TOWN CALENDAR 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen 

Officers and Committees 

Town Clerk 20 

Equal Employment Opportunity Committee 44 

Town Bylaw Committee 46 

FINANCE 

Financial Services 58 

Town Treasurer 60 

Town Accountant 65 

Board of Assessors 80 

Collector of Taxes 84 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire § Police Department 86 

Civil Defense and Emergency Preparedness 91 

Inspectors of Buildings, Wiring $ Plumbing 92 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 
Board of Health 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 97 

Board of Appeals 100 

Conservation Commission 102 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 104 

Public Works Department 106 

Minute Man Regional Refuse Planning Board 108 

Lincoln Recycling Committee 112 

Water Commissioners 113 

Celebration Committee 116 

Cemetery Commissioners 117 
Minute Man National Historical Park 

Advisory Commission 3 

Lincoln 1975 Bicentennial Commission 3 

Lincoln Historical Commission 12^ 



Page 

SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

Lincoln Public Library 126 

DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park 130 

Recreation Committee 144 

Elementary Schools 146 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District 157 

Student Exchange Committee 179 

Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical 

School District Committee 181 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Vital Statistics 188 

Valuation List 194 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 228 



Revolutionary Recollections made be found between paaes 125 & 126 



TOWN CALENDAR 



SELECTMEN 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 
BOARD OF HEALTH 
BOARD OF APPEALS 
PLANNING BOARD 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

POPULATION 
TOWN AREA 
1974-75 TAX RATE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



ANNUAL ELECTION OF 
OFFICERS 

QUALIFICATIONS FOR 
REGISTRATION 

TOWN OFFICES 



Every Monday of each month, 7:30 p.rr 
Town Hall, 259-8850 

First and third Mondays of each mont! 
8:00 p.m., Superintendent's Office, ! 
259-9400 

For appointments call Town Hall, 
259-8850 

Meetinqs by appointment 

Meetings by appointment 

Call Town Hall, 259-8850 

Every other Wednesday, 8:00 p.m., 
Town Hall, 259-8850 

First and third Wednesdays of each 
month, 8:00 p.m., Town Hall, 259-885( 

4,998 

14.56 square miles 

$61.80 per $1,000 valuation 

Saturday before the last Monday in 
March - March 29, 1975 

Last Monday in March - March 31, 1975 

Residence in the Town of Lincoln 

Open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m. Closed on Saturdays. 



General Government 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Robert M. Gargill 

Harold A. Levey, Jr. 

John B. Garrison, Chairman 



This board is completing its third year intact and several of 
its key programs have now come to fruition. These programs have 
all been carefully conceived within our basic priorities of 1) a 
land use policy which will preserve the quality of life in the 
Town, 2) a deep concern for the human needs of each citizen, and 
3) a strong commitment to fiscal integrity. Much of what fol- 
lows characterizes these commitments. 

RECENT MILESTONES 

In reviewing the developments of the past year, certain com- 
pleted projects stand out as positive benefits provided since last 
Town Meeting. Least observed, but in the long range most bene- 
ficial, was the merger of Town and School financial functions at 
the Center School, a first for any town or city in Massachusetts. 
The economies of the merger have already become apparent as some 
retiring employees will not be replaced. Moreover, new systems 
being installed are geared to handle with existing personnel an 
anticipated increase in Lincoln's population which the Farrar Pond 
Village and moderate income housing developments portend. 

A better publicized event was the completion of the Codman 
Pool, officially dedicated at a gala July 4th ceremony. The pres- 
ence of this recreational facility not only improved the level of 
local swimming, but provided a new meeting place for a substantial 
number of townspeople, widely separated geographically, and hereto- 
fore separated by lack of a focal point to which people might be 
drawn. On its first season's record, "Codman Pool" promises to 
become a valuable adjunct to Lincoln's summer life style. 

Also successful, and for a second season, was the frenetic 
activity of summer gardeners at the Codman Community Farms, with 
individual plots numbering over 100 and demand for still more 
another season. These activities provided a valuable blend of 

1 



agricultural production, with a social and recreational outlet for 
a disparate group of vegetable gardening enthusiasts, bee keepers, 
maple syrup producers, sheep raisers, and hayshakers of all ages, 
sizes and shapes. 

Resurrection of the Garland Cabin has begun with fund raising. ,j 
If the fund raising continues at the planned rate, actual con- 
struction may start this summer. 

Another promise was fulfilled when a new soundproofed dog 
pound was completed in the spring. This merely represents a hold- 
ing action for a growing and much larger problem related to the 
increasing number of uncontrolled and undisciplined dogs in town. 

Still begging for a permanent solution is our solid waste dis- 
posal problem. Our own local committee has labored valiantly to 
advance the concept of a regional solution, which still remains 
several years off. Some different temporary options are presently 
being pursued. One of these could very well tide us over until 
a regional plan embracing Lincoln is approved. 

A significant ground breaking ceremony took place on November 
30, 1974, on land being developed for moderate income housing. 
After more than ten years of persistent struggling, the Lincoln 
Foundation, now calling its new project, Lincoln Homes Corporation, 
is actually starting construction in hopes of completing its first 
units for occupancy within the year. 

Another significant achievement for Lincoln occurred when the i 
first relocation lots on the Smith-Norton land went on sale. ThiJ 
project was set in motion by the Selectmen to offer relief to land-- 
owners about to be displaced by the National Park and a possible 
relocation of Route 2 to a more northerly corridor. 

TRAFFIC 

Our No. 1 unresolved problem is Route 2. Though all the 
Town boards and a vast majority of the residents would like to see 
the route relocated in -a northern corridor as close to the National 
Park as allowable, detailed studies of nine optional solutions are 
now under consideration. A corridor decision is scheduled for 
this spring. Meanwhile, in the interest of safety on the present 
Route 2, the State Department of Public Works is conducting an ex- 
periment forbidding left turns into Bedford Road from either 
direction off Route 2. How this impacts other Lincoln streets 
is being watched, though the primary concern is to cut down on 



accidents at this intersection. Results of the study have yet to 
be published. 

We continue to live from year to year with a railroad commuter 
service dependent upon subsidy. Each year apprehension mounts as 
the subsidy period draws to an end and the only thing sure about 
the arrangement seems to be that the fare continues to rise. 

New mileage was added to the bicycle path system with the com- 
pletion of the Codman-South Great Road section this fall. The ex- 
tension of the Lincoln Road path from South Great Road to Postcard 
Lane is scheduled for completion by summer. 

Last September a set of updated Traffic Rules and Regulations 
was proposed and a month later approved by the State Department of 
Public Works. This gives our police some authority in controlling 
speed and parking in time to cope with the anticipated heavier 
volume of traffic this Bicentennial year. For the control of 
traffic associated with the Bicentennial exercises of April 19th, 
detailed and elaborate provisions have been made. This will neces- 
sitate our recruiting an auxiliary force of men and women to protect 
the town and to deal efficiently and courteously with visitors from 
near and far. 

Forbidding traffic to turn right into Sandy Pond Road from 
Route 2 eastbound in the morning (7 to 9 a.m.) has reduced the flow 
of fast moving traffic through the center of town, while adding a 
measure of safety for our local traffic and for children waiting 
for buses on Sandy Pond Road. 

The transfer of the Walden Pond Reservation from the control 
of the County to the State is regarded as a move that should bene- 
fit Lincoln in several ways. The State has the money to implement 
a restoration program which should improve the appearance of the 
Walden area, while checking the rapid erosion of the shores of the 
Pond and the deterioration of the surrounding woods and trails. A 
strict limit on the number of parking spaces serving Walden is de- 
signed to prevent overuse of the facilities, including swimming, 
and to divert the traffic from its present course to a relocated 
Route 126, passing in a more northerly arc around and further from 
the Pond. 

BICENTENNIAL 

Developments related to the Bicentennial have taken several 
forms. Our own Bicentennial Commission has prepared a calendar 



of events to take place throughout the year that is designed to 
stimulate local interest in Lincoln's connection with Revolutionary- 
history. A newly appointed Lincoln Historical Commission has un- 
dertaken an updating of the inventory of houses, furnishings and 
old landmarks. This process should help to focus attention on 
those properties in the inventory that go back to 1775 and before. 
For the safekeeping of documents and papers relating to our early 
history, the Library has constructed a new fireproof vault and dis- 
play room. This project has been supported by private and pub- 
lic subscriptions, with a final assist from a grant awarded by' the 
State Bicentennial Commission. In fact, Lincoln has not only 
been fortunate in receiving this grant, but has received two others 
as well. One grant is to the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High 
School for an oral history project, and the other to DeCordova 
Museum for the enlargement of its outdoor auditorium facility. 
DeCordova is committed to the presentation of Bicentennial related 
programs in this enlarged auditorium. 

REGULATORY ENFORCEMENT 

The least satisfactory aspect of the Selectmen's responsibility 
involves the profligate waste of time at all hours spent in trying 
to adjudicate disputes between neighbors and to enforce codes, 
ordinances and restrictions that have been violated, sometimes wil- 
fully, sometimes not. The Town is unlikely to get smaller in area 
or population, so these problems seem destined to increase in num- 
ber and intensity. In no particular order, we list the cause of 
our woes as being untrained and stray dogs and horses, motor cycles, 
mini-bikes, snowmobiles and cars operated or- parked inconsiderately. 

On a slightly different plane should be mentioned those viola- 
tions, wilful or otherwise, that tend to evade the normal town re- 
quirements of our Building Code and procedures. The Code re- 
quires application for a building permit for most construction 
work. This initiates inspections by wiring and plumbing inspect- 
ors, the building inspector and the Board of Health. Our permit 
and inspection fees have been both fair and reasonable and the gov- 
erning rules have been established by town meeting vote to protect 
property owners and the Town. Yet people continue to build, re- 
pair and alter, as if it were our job to catch them before they 
submit to the applicable regulations. This attitude constitutes 
a disservice to a lot of dedicated public servants, many of whom 
serve the town as unpaid volunteers. To this point in history, 
the Town has been run more economically than neighboring ones, in 
large measure because of our reliance upon conscientious and tal- 
ented volunteers. But our system presumes a basically honest and 
cooperative collection of householders and landowners. At the 



present time both the people and the system are being tested to 
the limit. Since the charm and style and cost of life in Lincoln 
is to a great extent bound in with the system, it seems as if the 
time has come to support it or face a greatly altered way of living 
here. 



Finally, an historic event passed almost unobserved, when, on 
January 6th, our Collector of Taxes and Town Treasurer of thirty 
years, Frederick B. Taylor, retired. For many of us, he's the 
only treasurer of Lincoln we ever knew. The services he has pro- 
vided and the skills he has brought to his job have saved the Town 
substantial amounts of money. We are grateful for his long and 
devoted service. 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



MODERATOR 



Term Expires 



Kenneth W. Bergen 1975 

TOWN CLERK 

George Wells 1975 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

John B. Garrison, Chairman 1977 

Robert M. Gargill 1976 

Harold A. Levey, Jr. 1975 

TOWN TREASURER 

Frederick B. Taylor (Resigned January 6, 1975) 1975 
Richard Wengren (Appointed) 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Douglas M. Burckett 1975 

Joseph Howard 1976 

J. Thomas Franklin 1977 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Frederick B. Taylor (Resigned January 6, 1975) 1977 
Richard Wengren (Appointed) 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Lynn Donaldson, Chairman 1975 

Robert Frank 1976 

John B. French 1975 

Muriel Weckstein 1977 

J. William Adams 1977 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Alan MeClennen 1977 

Thomas Norton 1976 

Stuart B. Avery 1975 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Gordon A. Donaldson, M. D., Chairman 1976 

Joan Comstock 1975 

Herbert A. Haessler, M. D. 1977 



Term Expires 

REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

William T. Maloney, Chairman 1976 

Joan W. Wo f ford, Vice Chairman 1976 

Martha C. A. Clough 1975 

J. Roger Flather, Jr. 1975 

Henry M. Morgan 1977 

Richard H. Davison 1977 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

James DeNormandie, Chairman 1977 

H. Vincent MacLean 1976 

Vincent N. Merrill 1975 

PLANNING BOARD 

Susan M. Brooks, Chairman 1978 

James R. Birkett 1979 

Robert C. Brannen 1977 

David M. Donaldson 1976 

Richard C. Reece 1975 

MEASURERS OF WOOD AND BARK 

Robert L. Sutherland 1975 

Ann E. Sutherland 1975 

COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Richard F. Schroeder 1977 

Archer desCognets 1976 

William T. King 1975 

TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND 

Rebecca B. Bailey 1977 

Nancy B. Ellis 1976 

Thomas B. Adams 1975 

TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 

Francis H. Gleason, Chairman Life Trustee 

Thomas B. Adams Life Trustee 

Martha DeNormandie Life Trustee 

Morley M. John (Resigned) Life Trustee 

Molly K. Turner (School Committee Appointee) 1976 

John R. Hughes (Selectmen Appointee) 1975 

Harriet L. Hardy (Resigned) (Elected by the Town) 1977 



Term Expires 

DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
"A" Directors 



John Pike 1978 

Francis S. Andrews 1977 

Walter J. Salmon 1976 

Gregory Kolligian 1975 

"B" Directors 

Janet B. Daniels, President (School Committee Appointee) 1977 

Chester d'Autremont, M. D. (Library Trustees Appointee) 1976 

Robert B. Newman (Selectmen Appointee) 1975 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Henry Hadley, Chairman (Elected by Town) 1977 

Roberta Spreadbury (Elected by Town) 1976 

Joseph Murphy (Elected by Town) 1975 

Enid Beal (Selectmen Appointee) 1977 

Virginia Niles (Selectmen Appointee) 1976 

C. Lee Todd (Selectmen Appointee) 1975 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
Warren F. Flint 1975 

FINANCIAL MANAGER 
Timothy Grobleski 1975 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Lois McClure Light 1976 

CLERK OF SELECTMEN 
Elizabeth J. Snelling * 1975 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Richard P. Carroll " 1975 

CHIEF OF POLICE 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1975 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE 
Charles E. Doyle 1975 



Term Expires 



POLICE SERGEANT 



David Davis 1975 

PATROLMAN-INSPECTOR 
Steven Ziegler 1975 

POLICE OFFICERS 

James Blackburn 1975 

David Finan 1975 

John Fitzgerald 1975 

Joseph T. Fratto 1975 

Richard Hallett 1975 

Thomas Moran 1975 

CONSTABLES 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1975 

Charles E. Doyle 1975 

SPECIAL CONSTABLE 
William F. Egar 1975 

DOG OFFICER 
Vincent De Amicis (Resigned December 31, 1974) 1975 

FIRE CHIEF 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1975 

PETROLEUM INSPECTOR 
Thomas W. Coan 1975 

FOREST WARDEN 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1975 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Ernest L. Johnson 1975 

ASSISTANT TO THE BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Arthur Mitchell 1975 

WIRING INSPECTOR 
William M. Dean 1975 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 
Daniel J. Murphy 1975 



Term Expires 



DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 
Alanson H. Sturgis, Jr. 

DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 



Ernest L. Johnson 
Eveleth R. Todd 



Lawrence Hallett 



Michael Spock 
Frederick Walkey 



William B. Whalen 
William B. Whalen 
William N. Swift 
Margaret M. Martin 



AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 



COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 



FENCE VIEWERS 



VETERANS' AGENT 



VETERANS' GRAVE OFFICER 



TOWN COUNSEL 



TOWN HISTORIAN 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 



Peggy G. Elliott 
William G. Langton 
Harold E. Lawson 
George Wells, ex officio 



REPRESENTATIVE TO MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 



Henry Spencer 



AIRPORT COMMUNITY COUNCIL 



Frederic J. Eppling 
Gregory Kolligian 
Harold E. Lawson 
L. Dennis Shapiro 



1975 



1975 
1975 



1975 



1975 
1975 



1975 



1975 



1975 



1975 



1977 
1976 
1975 
1975 



1975 



1975 
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1975 
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10 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Robert A. Lemire, Chairman 

John Quincy Adams 

Florence Caras 

James DeNormandie 

Lydia Dane 

Ronald Marcks 

William M. Preston 



NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Katharine S". White 
James DeNormandie 



(Appointee of Selectmen) 
(Appointee of Governor) 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



Elliott V. Grabill, Chairman 
Robert W. Jevon 
Barbara Barker 
Peter Meenan 
Hans vanLeer 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS, BOARD OF APPEALS 



Alice Pickman 
David Sykes 



Term Expires 



1977 
1976 
1975 
1976 
1975 
1975 
1977 



1975 



1976 
1979 
1978 
1977 
1975 



1976 
1978 



REPRESENTATIVE TO METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 
David M. Donaldson 1977 

REPRESENTATIVES TO SUBREGION INTERTOWN LIAISON COMMITTEE 



R. Langdon Wales 
James M. Spindler 



1975 
1975 



REPRESENTATIVES TO REGIONAL WASTE DISPOSAL PLANNING BOARD 



Ruth Ann Hendricks on 
Henry F. Harrison 
Margaret Stathos (Resigned) 
Fred Silverstein 



1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 



REPRESENTATIVE TO GOVERNOR'S TASK FORCE ON HANSCOM FIELD 
R. Langdon Wales 1975 

REPRESENTATIVE ON WALDEN POND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
John Quincy Adams 1975 

REPRESENTATIVE ON MIDDLESEX COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 



John B. Garrison 



1975 



11 



Term Expires i 

BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS 

Lawrence B. Anderson, Chairman 1975 

J. Edward Foster 1976 

W. Royce Taylor 1976 

Walter Belanger, Associate Member 1976 

LINCOLN 1975 BICENTENNIAL COMMISSION 

John W. Carman, Chairman 1975 

Katharine S. White, Vice Chairman 1975 

Saville R. Davis 1975 

Margaret Flint 1975 

Stanley Heck 1975 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1975 

Julia S. Pugh 1975 

Harriet Rogers 1975 

Sumner Smith 1975 

Frederick P. Walkey 1975 

Margaret Wengren 1975 

Margaret M. Martin, ex officio 1975 

LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Ruth Wales, Chairman 1975 

John Quincy Adams 1975 

Astrid Donaldson 1975 

John Todd 1975 

Charles Warner 1975 

CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 

Julia S. Pugh, Chairman 1976 

Donna Burt 1977 

Nils Touborg 1976 

Eleanor Wilfert 1975 

Glen Merry (Resigned) 1975 

PUBLIC SERVICE BOARD 

Edward S. Dewey, Chairman 1975 

Alan McClennen 1975 

Vincent N. Merrill 1975 

Roy Raja 1975 

John R. Snelling 1975 

PUBLIC SAFETY BOARD 

James Turner, Chairman 1975 

Norman Bikales 1975 

William Burt 1975 

Alexander Ellis 1975 

Robert Fraser 1975 

12 



Term Expires 



RELOCATION COMMITTEE 
George Kornfeld, Chairman 
Carol El wood 
Eleanor Fitzgerald 
Guido Perera 
Elmer H. Ziegler 

EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMITTEE 
Kate S. Culver, Chairman 
Cecilia Ives 
John Ritsher 
Paul Ross 
Lex H. Taylor 



1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 



1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 



SWIMMING POOL ACTION COMMITTEE 
Henry Had ley, Chairman 
Nelleke Allen (Resigned December, 1974) 
Ann B. Brown 
Albert Read 
Ann E. Sutherland 
Kay Yeuell (Appointed December, 1974) 



SPECIAL POLICE 



John Quincy Adams 
Leo J. Algeo 
Raymond Barnes 
Russell Barnes 
Robert H. Booth 
Allen Bowles 
Joseph Bozak 
Floriy Campobasso 
Joseph Campobasso 
Richard P. Carroll 
Edward Chisholm 
Stephen Coan 
Arthur Cotoni 
Vincent De Amicis 
Lorraine Dean (Matron) 
William M. Dean 
James DeNormandie 
William R. Doherty 
Lloyd A. Douty 
John J. Doyle 
James Finnerty 
Warren F. Flint 



1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 



1975 
1975 
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1975 
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1975 
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1975 
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13 



Term Expires 



SPECIAL POLICE (CONTINUED) 



Andrew D. Frazier, Jr. 

Robert M. Gargill 

John B. Garrison 

Richard Goddard 

Elliott V. Grabill 

Lawrence P. Hallett 

Frank Hidinger 

Richard Hodgson 

George J. Hofferty 

Christopher Ireland, Jr. 

Ernest L. Johnson 

William T. King 

Harry B. Knowles, III 

Harold E. Lawson 

Robert A. Lemire 

Harold A. Levey, Jr. 

Joseph Lenox 

Hazel A. Maclnnis (Matron) 

Donald Martini 

Thomas E. Moreau 

Paul V. Moynihan 

Mary Murphy (Matron) 

John O'Loughlin 

William M. Preston 

E. Donlan Rooney 

William C. Ryan 

Sumner Smith 

Alanson H. Sturgis, Jr. 

Kemon P. Taschioglou 

George Thomas 

Walter Van Wart 

Henry Warner 

William B. Whalert 

Susan Ziegler 

Richard Zilenski 



197S 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1975 
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14 



Name 



JURY LIST 



Address 



Allen, Mark C. 
Belle, Gene 
Bergen, Emily F. 
Carroll, Richard P. 
Cherniack, Jerome R. 
Chu, Chauncey C. 
Chu, George H. 
Clark, Clifford A. 
Collins, Edward C, II 
Courtney, J. Donald 
Crandall, Patricia E. 
Daniels, Bruce G. 
DeJesus, John 
DeNormandie, Martha 
Dexter, Barbara C. 
Donald, Aida D. 
Drop, Edward S. 
Faran, Ellen G. 
Fenijn, Chris J. 
Finn, Anne L. 
Fiorelli, Rose M. 
Fortin, Michael L. 
Gajewski, Ceslaus A. 
Garth, John C. 
Gary, Maida 
Grason, Rufus LeRoy 
Gregory, Mary 
Haartz, John C. 
Haggerty, John S. 
Hatsopoulos, George N. 
Hay t ay an, Harry M. 
Henderson, Robert S. 
Hill, Craig C. 
Hoch, Reimar H. H. 
Humez, David E. 
Hyde, Benjamin D. 
Ireland, Christopher M, 
John, Morley M. 
Kerrebrock, Bernice M. 
Kusleika, Louise 
Lane, Kathleen F. 
Larson, Robert C. 
Lemire, Virginia 



Baker Bridge Road 
Brooks Road 
Mackintosh Lane 
Long Meadow Road 
South Great Road 
Deerhaven Road 
Sandy Pond Road 
South Great Road 
Todd Pond Road 
Tower Road 
Tabor Hill Road 
Trapelo Road 
Bedford Road 
Trapelo Road 
Old Farm Road 
Lincoln Road 
South Great Road 
Tabor Hill Road 
Conant Road 
Old Sudbury Road 
Codman Road 
Virginia Road 
Bedford Lane 
Morningside Lane 
Old Farm Road 
Bedford Road 
Weston Road 
Upland Field Road 
Partridge Lane 
Stonehedge 
Sunnyside Lane 
Giles Road 
Winter Street 
Todd Pond Road 
Lexington Road 
Tower Road 
Old County Road 
Old Concord Road 
Tower Road 
Granville Road 
Deer Run Road 
Bedford Road 
Codman Road 

15 



Occupation 

Business 

Mfg. Engineer 

Housewife 

Engineer 

Mathematician 

Engineer 

Architect 

Inv. Counselor 

Architect 

Machinist 

Housewife 

Self Employed 

Supermarket Op. 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Editor 

Carpenter 

Housewife 

Asst. Gen. Mgr. 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Park Appraiser 

Methods Planner 

Res. Physicist 

Statistics 

Parts Coordin. 

Woodworker 

Executive 

Scientist 

Co. Executive 

Engineer 

Engineer 

Self Employed 

Sales Engineer 

Elec. Engineer 

Engineer 

Inv. Control 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Secretary 

V. P. Sales 

Housewife 



JURY LIST (CONTINUED 



Name 



Address 



Occupation 



Leslie, Bernard A. 
Lewis, William R. 
Lo, Steven S. T. 
Loewenstein, Paul 
Lustwerk, I. Theodora 
Manzelli, Donald M. 
Manzer, Deward F. 
McClennen, Louise H. 
McGarry, Richard J. 
Meade, Edmund J. 
Merry, Glenn W. 
Mueller, Jane K. 
Nault, Marjorie A. 
Newman, Elsa 
Olsen, Aulikki E. 
O'Reilly, Joseph J. 
Panetta, Frank 
Parish, Edward C, Jr, 
Parsons, Robert T. 
Senders, John W. 
Smith, Nellie L. 
Todd, Conrad H. 
Vockel, Virginia 
Whitman, Ross 
Wilfert, Walter A. 
Winship, Lee C. 
Worsham, Jack L. 



Cambridge Turnpike 
Linway Road 
Brooks Road 
Laurel Drive 
Page Road 
Meadowbrook Road 
Page Road 
Silver Hill Road 
Goose Pond Road 
Old Sudbury Road 
Trapelo Road 
Huckleberry Hill 
Fox Run Road 
Todd Pond Road 
Weston Road 
Lincoln Road 
Cambridge Turnpike 
Lincoln Road 
Pierce Hill Road 
Conant Road 
Concord Road 
Farrar Road 
Bedford Road 
Wheeler Road 
Virginia Road 
Brooks Road 
Sandy Pond Road 



Engineer 

Salesman 

Architect 

Metalurgist 

Housewife 

Gen. Contractor 

Prod. Planning 

Housewife 

V. P. Engineer 

Supervisor 

Photographer 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Salesman 

Self Employed 

Salesman 

Business 

Res-. Scientist 

Housewife 

Ins. Underwr. 

Ind. Psychol. 

Chemist 

Truck Driver 

Consultant 

Sales Engineer 



16 



APPOINTED BY THE TOWN CLERK 



Roberta M. Page 
Elizabeth J. Snelling 
Arietta L. Spooner 



ASSISTANT TOWN CLERKS 



Term Expires 



1975 
1975 
1975 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 



:Ann E. Paddock 



ASSISTANT TREASURER 



1975 



APPOINTED BY THE TAX COLLECTOR 



Ann E. Paddock 



DEPUTY TAX COLLECTOR 



APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 



Cheryl Ciechomski 
George Wells 
Margaret B. Marsh 



COMMUNITY NURSE 



BURIAL AGENT 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



Ross Whitman, Chairman 
Virginia Vockel 
Kenneth Lawrence 



17 



1975 



1975 
1975 
1975 



1976 
1977 
1975 



Term Expires 

VOCATIONAL REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

Ruth Wales " 1977 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Arthur L. Coburn, III, Chairman 1975 

Betty Lang 1975 

William C. Munroe, Jr. 1976 

William A. Williams, Jr. 1977 

John R. Ehrenfeld 1977 

TOWN BY-LAWS COMMITTEE 

R. Langdon Wales, Chairman 1975 

Robert S. Henderson 1975 

John A. Ritsher 1975 

Dilla Tingley 1975 

Henry Warner 1975 



APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN, 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE AND MODERATOR 



TOWN BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Guilbert S. Winchell 1977 

James Duffy 1977 

Alice McKennan (Resigned) 1978 

SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 

Saville R. Davis, Chairman 1977 

Edith Mar 1975 

Charles W. Calkins, Jr., D. M. D. 1976 
Daniel Cheever, Jr., ex officio 



APPOINTED BY PLANNING BOARD 

BICYCLE PATH STUDY COMMITTEE 

Marjorie Smith, Chairman 1975 

Gwendolyn Bell 1975 

Mary Murray Coleman 1975 

Kathryn DeFord 1975 

John R. Snelling 1975 

Laurence Zuelke 1975 



18 



Term Expires 
APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN AND PLANNING BOARD 

BY '80 PLANNING GROUP 



Morton B. Braun 


1975 


Elizabeth C. Donaldson 


1975 


Anne Harney 


1975 


Harold A. Levey, Jr. 


1975 


Max Mason, Jr. 


1975 


Marjorie Salmon, Executive Secretary 


1975 


Perry J. Culver, M. D., Chairman 


1975 


AIRCRAFT NOISE STUDY COMMITTEE 




Bruce Comjean 


1975 


Paul E. Giese 


1975 


K. Uno Ingard 


1975 


L. Dennis Shapiro 


1975 


Mary Spindler 


1975 


Evan Semerjian, Chairman 


1975 



APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN, PLANNING BOARD AND BY '80 GROUP 

DESIGN REVIEW BOARD 

Lawrence B. Anderson 1975 

Stephen Lo 1975 

Joseph O'Reilly 1975 

Laurence Zuelke 1975 

Earl R. Flansburgh, Chairman 1975 



19 



TOWN CLERK 

George Wells 



The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events and 
activities and issues licenses and certificates. His duties include 
recording the proceedings at Town Meetings and Elections and notify- 
ing the Selectmen and other officers concerned of appropriations 
which have been voted. 

The record of registered voters of Lincoln is kept at the 
Town Clerk's office. Persons wishing to become voters in the Town 
should communicate with the Clerk. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 2-3, 1974 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the meeting was called 
to order by the Moderator, Mr. Kenneth W. Bergen, at 9:40 a.m. The 
return of the Warrant was read, and the Moderator called attention 
to Article 1 of the Warrant (Election of Officers) , which will be 
acted upon on March 25th. A quorum being present, the following 
business was transacted: 



ARTICLE 2 . To bring in their votes for any committees, 
commissioners, trustees , and other officers required by law to be 
elected by ballot or otherwise. 

VOTED : That Robert L. Sutherland and Ann F. 
Sutherland be elected Measurers of Wood and Bark for the ensuing 
year. 

ARTICLE 3 . To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

VOTED : That the reports of the Town Officers, 
Committees, Commissioners and Trustees, as printed in the Town Report 
be accepted. 

ARTICLE 4 . To fix the salaries and compensation of the 
several elective officers of the Town and to determine whether any 
Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for 
additional compensation any of its members and to fix additional 

20 



compensation of such members. 

VOTED : That the salaries of the elected officials 
of the Town for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1974, and ending 
June 30, 1975, be fixed at the following amounts: 

Selectmen, each $ 100.00 

Town Clerk 200.00 

Treasurer § Collector 700.00 

Assessors, Chairman 200.00 

Assessors, other members, each 175.00 

Water Commissioners, each 75.00 

and that the Board of Assessors is authorized to employ one of its 
members to work on the new Town Maps at a salary not to exceed 
$2,000 for the said fiscal period. 

ARTICLE 5 . To raise and appropriate money for the 
necessary and expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town adopt as separate appropria- 
tions the listed recommendations in Exhibit 6, attached to the 
report of the Finance Committee, printed on pages 16 through 24, 
inclusive, of the Financial Section and Warrant for the 1974 Town 
Meeting, except that the following numbered account will be increased 
as follows: 

Item 82 - Conservation Commission Expense - will increase by 
$6,800 to $17,500; 

and the following numbered accounts will be decreased as follows: 

Item 502 - Elementary Schools - Instruction - will be decreased 
by $14,500 to $1,168,100; 

Item 909 - Youth Director and Program - will be decreased by 
$10,000 to zero; 

and that all items be raised by taxation except to the following 
extent : 

Item 30 - Treasurer and Collector - salaries - $1,575.00 to 
be taken from Water Department receipts when 
received; 

Item 100 - Police Department - Salaries - $50,000 to be taken 
from Federal Revenue Sharing Funds, and $15,800 to 

21 



be taken from the Agency Account established for 
payments in lieu of taxes; 

Item 301 - Road Maintenance - $13,000 to be taken from the 

Agency Account established under the provisions of 
Chapter 1140 of the Acts of 1973 (Local Transporta^ 
tion Aid Program); 

Item 320 - Chapter 90 Maintenance - $6,000 to be taken from 
free cash and returned thereto when received; 

Item 321 - Chapter 90 Construction - $13,500 to be taken from 
free cash and returned thereto when received; 

Item 502 - Elementary Schools - Instruction - $42,750 to be 
taken from Metco funds; 

Item 504 - Elementary -Schools - Operation § Maintenance - 
$1,237.77 to be taken from the Julian deCordova 
School Equipment Fund and $65.18 from the Grammar 
School Fund; 

Item 520 - Library - Salaries - $1,641.72 to be taken from 
Dog Tax receipts; 

Item 521 - Library - Books, etc. - $2,837.63 to be taken from 
State Aid to Libraries; 

Item 805 - School Building Bonds - $72,500 to be taken from 
free cash; 

Item 815 - Swimming pool bonds - $10,000 to be taken from the 
Agency Account established for funds to be received 
from the Codman Trustees; 

Item 816 - Interest on swimming pool bonds - $5,500 to be 

taken from the Agency Account established for funds 
to be received from the Codman Trustees. 

The total for General Purposes for the fiscal period from 
July 1, 1974, through June 30, 1975, is shown in Exhibit 6 as 
$3,885,753.63, and with amendments is now $3,868,053,63. After 
application of special funds as listed above, the amount to be 
raised by taxation is now $3,631,646.33. 



22 



Items 950 to 956, inclusive, totalling $132,400.00, as 
listed on page 24, shall be taken from Water Department receipts. 

(A motion to further reduce Item 502 - Elementary Schools - 
Instruction - by an additional $15,500 was defeated.) 

ARTICLE 6 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the finan- 
cial year beginning July 1, 1974, in accordance with the provisions 
of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as 
may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

VOTED^ That the Town Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning July 1, 1974, in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, 
payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be 
given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

ARTICLE 7 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
gifts of money and income received from use of conservation proper- 
ties for the maintenance and improvement of conservation properties, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : To pass over the Article. 

ARTICLE 8 . To see if the Town will authorize the Board 
of Selectmen and the School Committee to continue the Town's annual 
contract with the U. S. Commissioner of Education to operate the 
elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, Massachusetts, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town authorizes the Board of 
Selectmen and the School Committee to continue the Town's annual 
contract with the U. S. Commissioner of Education to operate the 
elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, Massachusetts. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to support the 
School Committee in its continuing plan to bring a limited number of 
children from Boston to the Lincoln Schools for purposes of education., 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town supports the School Committee 
in its continuing plan to bring a limited number of children from 
Boston to the Lincoln schools for purposes of education. 

23 



ARTICLE 10 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of a new fire engine for 
the use of the Fire Department, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $27,500 for the purchase of a new fire engine for the use 
of the Fire Department. 



At 1:15 p.m. the Annual Meeting was temporarily adjourned in 
order that a Special Town Meeting, which had been called for this 
time and place, might be held. 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
March 23, 1974 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Special Town Meeting was 
called to order by the Temporary Moderator, Mr. John W. White, at 
1:15 p.m., and a quorum being present, the following action was taken 
on said Article 1: 

ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote fo revoke in 
its entirety the vote under Article 15 of the Warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting held on March 24, 1973, which vote authorized the Select 
men to exchange certain parcels of land owned by the Town in South 
Lincoln for certain other parcels owned by the Trustees of the Rural 
Land Foundation, and under which no action has been taken; and to 
substitute therefor a new vote authorizing a similar exchange, with 
certain minor changes in the location of a municipal parking lot and 
a roadway easement to serve said parking lot and the moderate income 
housing complex, all as shown on a preliminary study plan entitled 
"1974 Land Plan of South Lincoln, Mass.", dated March 16, 1974, by 
Cleverdon, Varney § Pike, a copy of which is on file with the Town 
Clerk and available for inspection, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED : That the vote under Article 15 of the 
Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting held on March 24, 1973, which 
vote authorized the Selectmen to exchange certain parcels of land 
owned by the Town in South Lincoln for certain other parcels owned 
by the Trustees of the Rural Land Foundation of Lincoln and under 
which no action has been taken, is hereby revoked in its entirety 
and the following new vote substituted therefor: 

"That the Selectmen are authorized in the name and on behalf 
of the Town to acquire in fee for municipal parking purposes, 
subject to an easement for all purposes for which private ways 

24 



are commonly used in Lincoln to be retained by the present 
owners , by eminent domain, purchase, exchange or any other way 
from the Trustees of the Rural Land Foundation of Lincoln, a 
certain parcel of land shown as Lot A on a preliminary study 
plan of land entitled "1974 Land Plan, South Lincoln, Mass.", 
dated March 16, 1974, by Cleverdon, Varney § Pike, a final 
version of which, suitable for recording, is to be prepared 
and recorded with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds, 
and to obtain by purchase, exchange or in any other way an 
agreement from said Trustees to continue to permit the Town 
to use a portion of Lot C as shown on said Plan for municipal 
parking purposes as hereinafter provided; that in exchange for 
the above the Selectmen in the name and on behalf of the Town 
are authorized to convey to said Trustees Lots B and B-l as 
shown on said Plan and to release to said Trustees any other 
parking and highway rights and licenses on Lot C as shown on 
said Plan, said exchange to be subject to an easement to be 
retained by the Town with respect to Lot B-l for all purposes 
for which private ways are commonly used in Lincoln over the 
portion of said lot shown as "Roadway Easement" on said Plan 
and subject to the obligation of said Trustees to construct 
a road in accordance with the Town's requirements over the 
portions of Lots B-l and A shown as "Roadway Easement" on said 
Plan and subject further to an easement for municipal parking 
purposes to be retained by the Town over both the entire area 
of Lot B-l and to the extent it presently exists an area of 
Lot C as shown on said Plan until such time as such Trustees 
have constructed a municipal parking area in accordance with 
the Town's requirements on Lot A (other than on said "Road- 
way Easement" area) as shown on said Plan and finally subject 
to a receipt by said Trustees acknowledging payment in full by 
the Town for the land hereinabove described to be acquired by 
the Town." 

(This article was voted unanimously.) 

At 1:45 p.m., there being no further business to be transacted 
the Special Town Meeting was adjourned. 



At this point the Annual Town Meeting was re-convened, with 
Mr. Kenneth W. Bergen, again acting as Moderator, and the following 
business was transacted. 



25 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of equipment for the use i 
of the Public Works Department, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED: That the sum of $14,000 be raised and 
appropriated for the purchase of equipment for the use of the Public j| 
Works Department, $11,000 of said sum to be appropriated from the 
Agency Account established with funds allocated to the Town pursuant 
to the provisions of Chapter 1140 of the Acts of 1973, and $3,000 of ! 
said sum to be raised by taxation. 

ARTICLE 12 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to lay out and construct a bicycle path, 
partly within the boundaries of Lincoln Road and partly on private 
lands, from the intersection of said Lincoln Road with South Great 
Road (Route #117) to Long Meadow Road, all as shown on a preliminary 
plan entitled "Preliminary Plan of a Portion of Lincoln Road with 
Bicycle Path", presently on file with the Town Clerk and available 
for inspection, a final version of said plan suitable for recording ) 
to be recorded with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds; for I 
said purposes to acquire necessary easements or interests in fee by I 
eminent domain, purchase, or any other way, from private owners 
wherever shown on said plan; and to provide said sum by taxation or I 
from free cash or partly from each, all under the authority of Gen- 
eral Laws, Chapter 82, Section 35, or take any other action relative] 
thereto. 

VOTED: (majority voice vote) That the Town raise and 
appropriate the sum of $20,000 for the laying out and construction of 
a bicycle path on Lincoln Road, from its intersection of South Great 
Road southerly over land belonging to the Massachusetts Audubon 
Society, Inc., to the private driveway sometimes known as Postcard 
Lane, as shown on a plan entitled "Preliminary Plan of a Portion of 
Lincoln Road with Bicycle Path", a final version of said plan suit- 
able for recording to be recorded with Middlesex South District Reg- 
istry of Deeds; and for said purpose, the Selectmen are hereby auth-' 
orized in the name and on behalf of the Town to accept the gift of 
the necessary easement from the said Massachusetts Audubon Society, 
Inc. , as shown on said plan. 

ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to lay out and construct a bicycle path, 
partly within the boundaries of Codman Road and South Great Road 
and partly on private lands, from the intersection of said Codman 
Road with Lincoln Road, along Codman Road to South Great Road, and 
thence along South Great Road to Tower Road, all as shown on a pre- 
liminary plan entitled "Preliminary Plan of Portions of Codman Road 

26 



and South Great Road with Bicycle Path", presently on file with the 
Town Clerk and available for inspection, a final version of said plan 
suitable for recording to be recorded with Middlesex South District 
Registry of Deeds; for said purposes to acquire necessary easements 
or interests in fee by eminent domain, purchase, or any other way, 
from private owners wherever shown on said plan; and to provide said 
sum by taxation or from free cash or partly from each, all under the 
authority of General Laws, Chapter 82, Section 35, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate the sum 
of $24,000 for the laying out and construction of a bicycle path, 
partly within the boundaries of Codman Road and South Great Road, 
and partly on private lands, from the intersection of said Codman 
Road with Lincoln Road, to the intersection of Codman Road with 
South Great Road, and thence along South Great Road to Tower Road, 
as shown on a plan entitled "Preliminary Plan of Portions of Codman 
Road and South Great Road with Bicycle Path", a final version of 
said plan suitable for recording to be recorded with Middlesex South 
District Registry of Deeds; and for said purpose, the Selectmen are 
hereby authorized in the name and on behalf of the Town to acquire 
necessary easements or interests in fee by purchase, gift, eminent 
domain, or any other way, from private owners wherever shown on said 
plan. (Vote - yes, 250; no, 9) 

ARTICLE 14 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
zoning bylaw by altering the Use Regulations as they pertain to the 

2 Service Business District (Section V, B, 2), as proposed in an 
amendment now on file with the Town Clerk and available for inspec- 
tion, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (unanimous) That the Zoning By-Law of the 
Town, as adopted December 13, 1960, approved by the Attorney General 
January 27, 1961, and effective February 7, 1961, and thereafter 
amended, be further amended as follows: 

(1) by deleting the present subparagraph (a) under Section 
V, B, 2, Uses Permitted , and by substituting therefor 
the following new subparagraph (a) : -"Any uses permitted 
and as regulated elsewhere in this By-Law in a R-2 General 
Residence District."; 

(2) by deleting the present subparagraphs (c) and (d) under 
this same section; 

(3) by deleting the present wording after "Uses Permitted 
Subject to Permission of the Board of Appeals, as provided 
in Section XI below", under this same section, and by 



27 



substituting therefor the following: "in buildings existing at the 
time of the adoption of this provision the following uses, provided 
that the floor area so used shall not exceed 5,000 square feet, 
office, crafts workshops, including retail sales of products thereof, 
sales and rentals of light equipment, barbershop, hairdresser, dry- 
cleaning outlet, light manufacturing and assembly generating no 
noise, smoke, odor, or other offensive characteristics, general 
building, building maintenance, landscaping, electrical and similar 
contractors, including outdoor storage of supplies, tools, equipment 
and vehicles incidental to actual conduct of the activity; and multi- 
family residential structures on parcels in excess of 80,000 square 
feet, provided there shall be available a lot area of 7,000 square 1 
feet per dwelling unit." 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws of the Town by striking out the present Section 5 
of Article II entitled "Town 'Meetings" and inserting in place therec 
the following new Section 5, as follows: 

"Section 5. The number of voters necessary to constitute a 
quorum at any Town Meeting shall be 100, provided, however, 
that a number less than a quorum may from time to time adjouri 
the same, and provided that at the time of voting on the follow- 
ing questions the number of voters constituting a quorum shall! 
be as hereinafter specified with respect to each such question: j 

(1) An amendment to the Zoning Map of the Town to provide fori J 
the establishment of a B-3 Selected Light Industrial Dis-fl J 
trict under Section V, B, 3, of the Zoning By-Law - ( 
Quorum 400; 

(2) Any other amendment to the Zoning Map of the Town, any 
vote authorizing the acquisition of property by eminent 
domain, any vote to borrow money authorizing the issue of . 
notes or bonds of the Town, and any vote to effect a 
change in the General By-Laws of the Town - Quorum 250 each. It 

This section shall not apply to such parts of the meetings as 
are devoted to the election of Town Officers."; 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the matter be referred to a committee 
of not less than three (3) nor more than five (5) persons, to be 
appointed by the Moderator, to study and report to the next Annual 
Town Meeting. 



28 



(At this point, at the request of the Selectmen, a show of hands 
indicated overwhelming vote for Saturday Town Meetings, as at pre- 
sent, rather than a return to the Monday night Town Meetings.) 



ARTICLE 16 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
from the proceeds of the fire insurance policies covering the recent 
damage by fire to the Garland cabin off Sandy Pond Road a sum not in 
excess of such proceeds ($5,826), to be used together with any other 
sums that may from time to time be provided by gift, appropriation, 
or otherwise, for the purpose of rebuilding said cabin, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town vote to appropriate from the 
proceeds of the fire insurance policies covering the recent damage 
by fire to the Garland cabin off Sandy Pond Road a sum not in excess 
of such proceeds ($5,826.00), to be used together with any other sums 
that may from time to time be provided by gift, appropriation, or 
otherwise, for the purpose of rebuilding said cabin. 

ARTICLE 17 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to be added to the balance remaining in 
the funds voted under Article 12- of the Special Town Meeting on 
June 7, 1972, for the installation of fire detector heat and/or 
smoke sensors in the Town Hall, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $2,700.00, to be added to the balance remaining in the 
funds voted under Article 12 of the Warrant for the Special Town 
Meeting on June 7, 1972, (said balance being $3,589.47) for the in- 
stallation of fire detector heat and/or smoke sensors in the Town 
Hall. 

ARTICLE 18 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer from available funds, a sum of money to be 
placed in a separate account in the town treasury, all as authorized 
by Chapter 911 of the Acts of 1971, to be expended for the celebra- 
tion in the year nineteen hundred and seventy-five or nineteen hun- 
dred and seventy-six of the two hundredth anniversary of the American 
Revolution, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $12,000 to be placed in a separate account in the Town 
Treasury to be expended for the celebration in the year 1975 or 1976 
of the 200th anniversary of the American Revolution, all as author- 
ized by Chapter 911 of the Acts of 1971. 



29 



ARTICLE 19 . To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Section 8D of Chapter 40 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth, 
which provides for the establishment of an historical commission 
for the preservation, promotion and development of the historical 
assets of the Town, and to establish an historical commission of the 
Town of Lincoln for the purposes and with the rights and duties pro- 
vided by law, said commission to be composed of five members, to be 
appointed by the Selectmen for terms of three years each, except 
that initial terms shall be one member for one year, two members for 
two years, and two members for three years, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town vote to accept Section 8D of 
Chapter 40 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth, which provides 
for the establishment of an historical commission for the preserva- 
tion, promotion and development of the historical assets of the Town, 
and to establish, under the provisions of said statute, an histori- 
cal commission of the Town of Lincoln, for the purposes and with the 
rights and duties provided by law, said commission to be composed 
of five (5) members, appointed by the Selectmen for terms of three 
years each, except that initial terms shall be one member for one 
year, two members for two years, and two members for three years. 

ARTICLE 20 . To see if the Town will vote to adopt the 
following resolution: 

"RESOLVED: That the Town favors action by the Selectmen to 
include in the rules governing the operation of the sanitary 
land fill an additional provision prohibiting users, of the 
facility from depositing newspapers , magazines and eardboard 
in the area to be filled and requiring that such paper products, 
properly bundled, be deposited in the recyclable paper recept- 
acle provided for the purpose;" 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town adopt the following resolution 

"RESOLVED: That the Town favors action by the Selectmen to 
include in the rules governing the operation of the sanitary 
land fill an additional provision prohibiting users of the 
facility from depositing newspapers, magazines and corrugated 
cardboard in the area to be filled, and requiring that such 
paper products, properly bundled, be deposited in the recy- 
clable paper receptacle provided for that purpose." 



30 



ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of meeting the Town's 
allocable share of expenses incurred or to be incurred by an Regional 
Refuse Disposal Planning Board joined by the Town's Regional Refuse 
Disposal Planning Committee in connection with studying the advisa- 
bility of establishing a regional refuse disposal district pursuant 
to General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 44B, et seq. , or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $500, to be added to the balance remaining in the amount 
voted under Article 28 of the Warrant for the Annual Meeting on 
March 24, 1973 (said 'balance being $2,000), for the purpose of meet- 
ing the Town's allocable share of expenses incurred or to be incurred 
by any Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Board joined by the Town's 
Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Committee in connection with 
studying the advisability of establishing a regional refuse disposal 
district. 

ARTICLE 22 . To see if the Town will vote to reaffirm 
the approval granted under Article 24 of the Warrant for the 1973 
Annual Town Meeting in respect to the issuance by Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional School District of bonds not exceeding $175,000 (authorized 
by said School District Committee on March 20, 1973) for the purpose 
of financing improvements to the athletic fields at the High School 
to correct drainage problems, notwithstanding that contrary to 
earlier expectations such improvements will not qualify for state 
aid, or act on anything relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the vote under Article 24. of the 
Warrant for the 1973 Annual Town Meeting approving the issuance by 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District of bonds not exceeding 
$175,000.00 (authorized by said School District Committee on 
March 20, 1973) for the purpose of financing improvements to the 
athletic fields at the high school and to correct drainage problems 
is hereby ratified and confirmed. 

ARTICLE 23 . To see if the T«own will vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to act as representatives of the citizens of the Town 
of Lincoln to receive sums of money from Roger B. Tyler and Benjamin 
T. Fawcett, Trustees under the will of Dorothy S. F. M. Codman, to 
establish a separate agency account for such sums , and to expend 
sums therefrom for the purposes for which such sums were designated 
by the Trustees, after consultation by the Trustees with the Select- 
men and such other Town boards as the Trustees deem advisable. 

VOTED : That the Town vote tc authorize the 
Selectmen to act as representatives of the citizens of the Town of 



31 



Lincoln to receive sums of money from Roger B. Tyler and Benjamin T. 
Fawcett, Trustees under the will of Dorothy S. F. M. Codman, and 
their successors, and that a separate agency account for such sums 
be established, and that sums therefrom be expended for the purposes 
for which such sums were designated by the Trustees, after consulta- 
tion by the Trustees with the Selectmen and such other Town boards 
as the Trustees deem advisable. 

ARTICLE 24 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the establishment of an agency account, into which all fees received 
in connection with the use of the Town swimming pool may be placed, 
said sums to be used by the Recreation Committee to pay the operat- 
ing and maintenance costs of said pool, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town vote to authorize the estab- 
lishment of an agency account, into which all fees received in 
connection with the use of the Town swimming pool may be placed, 
said sums to be used by the Recreation Committee to pay the operat- 
ing and maintenance costs of s'aid pool. 

ARTICLE 25 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln by adding to Article XI - 
"Miscellaneous" the following new Section 12: 

"Section 12. Wherever it exists within the Town, a bicycle 
path is hereby designated as a bicycle lane within the meaning 
of Clause 16B of Section 21 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws. 
Every person operating a bicycle within the Town shall, wher- 
ever a bicycle path exists , and whenever requested to do so 
by a police officer because of traffic conditions, ride on 
such path and not on the street portion of the way. A bicycle 
operated by any person in violation of this section may be 
impounded by the Police Department for a period not exceeding 
15 days, or the operator may be punished by a fine of not more 
than $20 for each offense" 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the General By-Laws of the Town be 

amended by adding to Article XI - "Miscellaneous" the following new 
Section 12: 

"Section 12. Wherever it exists within the Town, a bicycle 
path is hereby designated as a bicycle lane within the meaning 
of Clause 16B of Section 21 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws. 
Every person operating a bicycle within the Town shall, wher- 
ever a bicycle path exists, and whenever requested to do so by 



32 



a police officer because of traffic conditions, ride on such 
path and not on the street portion of the way. A bicycle 
operated by any person in violation of this section may be 
impounded by the Police Department for a period not exceed- 
ing 15 days, or the operator may be punished by a fine of 
not more than $20 for each offense." 

ARTICLE 26 . To see if the Town will amend the vote 
under Article 15 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting held 
on March 24, 1973, which vote authorized the Selectmen to exchange 
certain parcels of land owned by the Town in South Lincoln on the 
northerly side of the railroad tracks for certain other parcels 
owned by the Trustees of the Rural Land Foundation of Lincoln upon 
terms and conditions specified in said vote, in order to clarify 
the location of an easement to be granted by the Trustees of the 
Rural Land Foundation of Lincoln to the Town to pass and repass by 
foot, horseback and motor vehicle over Lot B-l on a preliminary 
study of land entitled "1973 Land Plan of South Lincoln ,Mass.", 
by Cleverdon, Varney § Pike, dated February 26, 1973, and in order 
to clarify an ambiguity as to the extent of a parking easement to be 
retained by the Town on Lot C on said Plan, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED : To pass over the article. 



At 5:45 p.m., there being no further business to come before 
the Meeting, it was voted to adjourn. 



George Wells, Town Clerk 



33 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 25, 1974 



In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting, the Polls were declared open at 7:30 p.m. by Mr. 
Harold Levey, who, with Mr. Robert M. Gargill, Mr. George Wells 
and Mrs. William Elliott, acted as Warden throughout the day. The 
following Ballot Clerks were duly sworn: Jacquelyn Snelling, 
Eleanor Wilfert, Ethel Mackenzie, Mary Hester, Sidney Walker, 
Bernice Kerrebrock, Natalie Faddoul , Jacqueline Cook, Muriel 
Bradford and Anne Sturgis. The Polls were declared closed by Mr. 
Gargill at 8 p.m. There was a total vote of 1184, with the follow- 
ing results: 



Town Clerk (for one year) 



Selectman (for three years) 



Town Treasurer (for one year) 



Collector of Taxes (for three 
years) 

Assessor (for three years) 



Water Commissioner (for three 
years) 

Board of Health (for three years) 



Cemetery Commissioner (for 
three years) 



Planning Board (for five years) 



George Wells 
Blanks 


1093 | 
91 


John B. Garrison 

Scattering 

Blanks 


1010 

1 
173 


Frederick B. Taylor 
Blanks 


1064 
120 


Frederick B. Taylor 
Blanks 


1062 
122 l 


J. Thomas Franklin 
Blanks 


962 
222 


Alan McClennen 
Blanks 


1030 
154 


Herbert A. Haessler, M.D. 
Blanks 


998 
186 


James DeNormandie 

Blanks 

Scattering 


1003 

180 

1 


James D. Birkett 

Scattering 

Blanks 


989 

1 
194 



34 



Planning Board (for two years) 


David M. Donaldson 


1005 




Scattering 


1 




Blanks 


178 


Commissioner of Trust Funds 


Richard F. Schroeder 


975 


(for three years) 


Blanks 


209 


Trustee of Bemis Fund (for three 


Rebecca B. Bailey 


953 


years) 


Blanks 


231 


Director, DeCordova d, Dana 






Museum £, Park (for four years) 


John A. Pike 


971 




Blanks 


213 


Recreation Committee (for three 






years) 


Henry H. Hadley 


964 




Scattering 


1 




Blanks 


219 


Recreation Committee (for two 


Roberta Spreadbury 


27 


years) 


Nancy Gregory 


7 




Michael Farny 


6 




John Lawson 


6 




Scattering 


38 




Blanks 


1100 


Library Trustee (for three years) 


Harriet L. Hardy, M.D. 


478 




Kenneth Laurence 


240 




Rhoda K. Taschioglou 


400 




Blanks 


66 


School Committee (for three 


J. William Adams 


565 


years) (2 members) 


William G. Elliott 


186 




Abraham I. Mlavsky 


336 




Muriel Weckstein 


673 




Dick J. Wollmar 


382 




Blanks 


226 


School Committee (for one year) 


John B. French 


573 




Raymond J. McEneaney 


67 




R. Karl van Leer 


503 




Blanks 


41 



35 



Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School 
District School Committee (for 
three years) (2 members) 



Henry M. Morgan 


979 | 


Richard F. Brooks 


300 


Lawrence Bussey, Jr. 


232 ! 


Richard H. Davison 


561 1 


Blanks 


296 J 



George Wells, Town Clerk 



36 



STATE PRIMARY 
September 10, 1974 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served , the Polls were declared 
open at 7 o'clock A. M. by Mr. George Wells, Town Clerk, who was 
assisted throughout the day by Mrs. William Elliott, Mr. William G. 
Langton and Mr. Harold E. Lawson. The Polls were declared closed 
at 8 o'clock P. M. by Mr. Wells. The total number of votes cast 
were as follows: Republican - 532; Democratic - 666. 



Republican 



Governor for the Commonwealth 



Lieutenant Governor for the 
Commonwealth 



Attorney General for the 
Commonwealth 



Secretary for the Commonwealth 
Treasurer for the Commonwealth 



Francis W. Sargent 
Carroll P. Sheehan 
Blanks 


410 

117 
5 


Donald R. Dwight 
Blanks 


472 
60 


Charles C. Cabot, Jr. 
William I. Cowin 
Josiah A. Spaulding 
Scattering 
Blanks 


190 
133 

183 

1 
25 


John M. Quinlan 
Blanks 


411 
121 


Scattering 
Erma Ballantine 
Blanks 


3 

18 

511 



Auditor for the Commonwealth 



Blanks 



Representative in Congress for 

the Fourth Congressional District Laurence Curtis 

Blanks 



532 



371 
161 



Councillor for the Third 
Councillor District 



Blanks 
Scattering 



531 

1 



37 



Senator for the Fifth Middlesex 
District 



Ronald C. MacKenzie 
Blanks 



400 

132 



Representative in General Court 
for the Thirty-eighth Middlesex 



District 


Edward M. Dickson 


414 




Blanks 


118 


District Attorney for the 






Northern District 


Blanks 


530 




Scattering 


2 


County Commissioner for 






Middlesex County 


Blanks 


528 




Scattering 


4 


Sheriff for Middlesex County 


John J. Buckley 


361 




Blanks 


171 


Democratic 




Governor for the Commonwealth 


Michael S. Dukakis 


591 




Robert H. Quinn 


62 




Blanks 


5 




Scattering 


8 


Lieutenant Governor for the 






Commonwealth 


Eva B. Hester 


142 




Christopher A. Iannella 


96 




John Pierce Lynch 


22 




Thomas P. O'Neill, III 


254 




Thomas Martin Sullivan 


24 




Blanks 


128 


Attorney General for the 






Commonwealth 


Francis X. Bellotti 


85 




Barry T. Hannon 


6 




Edward F. Harrington 


143 




Edward M. O'Brien 


13 




S. Lester Ralph 


276 




George L. Sacco 


78 




Blanks 
Scattering 


57 
8 



38 



Secretary for the Commonwealth 



John F. X. Davoren 
Paul H. Guzzi 
Blanks 
Scattering 



65 

553 

47 

1 



Treasurer for the Commonwealth 



Robert Q. Crane 
Charles Mark Furcolo 
Blanks 



248 
252 
166 



Auditor for the Commonwealth 



Thaddeus Buczko 

Blanks 

Scattering 



354 

310 

2 



Representative in Congress for 
the Fourth Congressional District 



Robert F. Drinan 
Blanks 



527 
139 



Councillor for the Third 
Councillor District 



Herbert L. Connolly 
Blanks 



267 
399 



Senator for the Fifth Middlesex 
District 



Blanks 
Alvin Levin 
Scattering 



645 

7 

14 



Representative in General Court 
for the Thirty-Eight Middlesex 
District 



Blanks 
Scattering 



660 
6 



District Attorney for the 
Northern District 



John J. Droney 

Blanks 

Scattering 



271 

394 

1 



County Commissioner for Middle- 
sex County 



John L. Danehy 61 

William J. Clements 15 

Charles I. Clough, Jr. 409 

Pasquale R. Coppola 20 

Edward A. Doherty 10 

Thomas E. McManus 20 

Blanks 131 



39 



Sheriff for Middlesex County 



Walter J. Sullivan 


270 


Blanks 


384 


Scattering 


12 



George Wells, Town Clerk 



STATE ELECTION 
November 5, 1974 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served , the Polls were declared 
open at 7:30 o'clock A. M. by Mr. George Wells, Town Clerk, who was 
assisted during the day by Mrs. Peggy Elliott, Mr. William G. 
Langton and Mr. Harold E. Lawson. The Polls were declared closed 
at 8 o'clock P. M. by Mr. Wells. The total number of votes cast 
was 2171. 

Governor and Lieutenant Governor 
of the Commonwealth 



Sargent and Dwight 
Dukakis and O'Neill 
Gurewitz and Bivins 
Kahian and Greco 
Blanks 



Republican 
Democratic 
Socialist Workers 
American Party 



1429 
676 

26 
17 
23 



Attorney General of the Commonwealth 



Francis X. Bellotti 
Josiah A. Spaulding 
Jeanne Lafferty 
Blanks 



Democratic 
Republican 
Socialist Workers 



324 

1788 

28 

31 



Secretary of the Commonwealth 



Paul H. Guzzi 
John M. Quinlan 
Blanks 



Democratic 
Republican 



1257 

834 

80 



40 



Treasurer of the Commonwealth 

Robert Q. Crane Democratic 1346 

Blanks 817 

Scattering 8 

Auditor of the Commonwealth 

Thaddeus Buczko Democratic 1355 

Blanks 811 

Scattering 5 

Congressman for the Fourth Congressional 
District 

Robert F. Drinan Democratic 1119 

Alvin Mandell Republican 454 

Jon Rotenberg Independent 553 

Blanks 45 

Councillor for the Third Councillor 
District 

Herbert L. Connolly Democratic 1167 

Blanks 999 

Scattering 5 

Senator for the Fifth Middlesex 
District 



Ronald C. MacKenzie Republican 1755 

Parker Weaver American Party 120 

Blanks 293 

Scattering 3 

Representative in General Court for the 
Thirty-eighth Middlesex District 

Edward M. Dickson Republican 1492 

Blanks 675 

Scattering 4 

District Attorney for the Northern District 

John J. Droney Democratic 1187 

Blanks 978 

Scattering 6 

41 



County Commissioner for Middlesex County 



John L. Danehy 

Blanks 

Scattering 



John J. Buckley 
Walter J. Sullivan 
Blanks 



Democratic 



Sheriff for Middlesex County 

Republican 
Democratic 



1078 

1087 

6 



1690 
337 
144 



Question No. 1 



Proposed Amendment to the 
Constitution (recesses of 
General Court) 



Yes 


1570 


No 


364 


inks 


237 



Question No. 2 



Proposed Amendment to the 
Constitution (1975 State 
Census) 



Yes 


1687 


No 


289 


Blanks 


195 



Question No. 3 



Proposed Amendment to the 
Constitution (grants in aid 
to private higher educa- 
tional institutions, etc.) 



Yes 


1374 


No 


585 


Blanks 


212 



Question No. 4 Law proposed by an initia- 
tive Petition, (expenditure 
of money from highway fund 
for mass transportation, etc.) Yes 

No 
Blanks 

Question No. 5 Law proposed by an initia- 
tive Petition, (establish- 
ment of an independent 
Corrupt Practices Commission) Yes 

No 
Blanks 



1615 
375 
181 



1312 
592 
267 



42 



Question No. 6 Should the General Court enact 
legislation during the nineteen 
hundred and seventy-five session reorganizing 
state government by creating a Department of 
Health Systems Regulation which shall have the 
power to administer the medicaid program, con- 
trol and set rates for nursing homes, hospi- 
tals , and other health providers under medi- 
caid, license and inspect health facilities, 
and regulate private health insurance poli- 
cies, medical and hospital service plans? 



Question No. 7 "Shall the Senator from this 
District be instructed to 
vote to approve a resolution memorializing 
the Congress of the United States in favor 
of Amnesty for all those who resisted the 
Vietnam War?" 



Yes 


1397 


No 


418 


Blanks 


356 



Yes 


1080 


No 


831 


Blanks 


260 



George Wells, Town Clerk 



43 



EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMITTEE 

Cecilia Ives 

John Ritsher 

Paul Ross 

Lex Taylor 

Kate Culver, Chairman 



The Lincoln Equal Employment Opportunity Committee has concerned 
itself at length this year with an effort to develop a legal action 
which would challenge the Massachusetts School Building Assistance I 
Bureau, which has not been requiring school building contractors to 
practice equal employment opportunity. The committee became in- 
volved in this direction because of the non-achievement of equal 
employment opportunity at the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School, I 
in spite of an EEO clause in the contract for recent additions and 
modifications there. Now, the School Building Assistance Act, 
Chapter 645 of the Acts of 1948, has come before the General Court 
for extension from July, 1976, to July, 1982. The League of 
Women Voters of Massachusetts is working for an amendment to the 
act which would require the inclusion of an affirmative action clause 
in all local school building contracts to bring it into conformity 
with former Governor Sargent's Executive Order #74, which addressed 
equal employment opportunity. 

Each year, the LEEOC reviews employment within the town. At 
this time, the Selectmen are considering the inclusion of a manda- ' 
tory EEO clause in all town contracts. The Lincoln Fire, Police 
and Highway Departments have waiting lists of job applicants. How 
ever, they are willing to place ads in minority publications when 
there are job openings. On May 21, the Lincoln School Committee 
voted to accept an affirmative action statement presented to them 
for their approval by the LEEOC. Last fall, the number of minor 
ity teachers in the Lincoln Public Schools dropped due to discon- 
tinuation of the Interdistrict Transfer Program, which was not re- 
funded by the state. The cost of training one former IDT teacher 
last summer for reading specialist work in the school was borne by 
the school. With the Lincoln school population shrinking, oppor- 
tunities for hiring are fewer, but the School Committee and the 
school administration seek a balance on the teaching staff with the 
intention of achieving a positive and productive percentage relatio 
ship between minority teachers and minority students. 

To implement EEO at the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School, 
new committee has been formed by the School Committee. It include 
one representative each from the Lincoln and Sudbury EEO Committees 

44 



The final statistics for the Minuteman Regional Vocational 
Technical High School construction project show that an overall 
minority employment percentage figure of 7.5% was reached. Although 
the figure is minimal and by no means meets the concept of equal 
employment within all the subcontracting groups which worked on the 
project, the Minuteman School Committee is to be congratulated for 
its firm support of the equal employment clause of the building con- 
tract. The school received no applications from minority students 
in the schools which it serves. Staff positions for the Minute- 
man were widely advertised, including in minority papers, per order 
of the School Committee, but no applications were received from 
minority persons. 

In the absence of a town housing committee, the LEEOC has tried 
to fill the gap. A survey of all house and apartment rentals was 
made, and owners indicated whether they would consider renting to 
minority individuals or families. The LEEOC is attempting to 
bring willing owners and prospective minority tenants together. 

In view of the variety of involvements of the LEEOC, the com- 
mittee decided that neither its name nor its description, as voted 
in Town Meeting in 1971, are accurate. It seems appropriate to 
redefine its mandate and change its name so that both are more in 
keeping with its activities and with similar committees in other 
towns. An article is being inserted in the town warrant for this 
purpose. 



45 



TOWN BYLAW COMMITTEE 

Robert S. Henderson 

John A. Ritsher 

Dilla G. Tingley 

Henry Warner 

R. Langdon Wales, Chairman 



I. BACKGROUND 

Some citizens, concerned that a small number of voters could 
work some injury or take grossly unwise action in a town meeting 
whose attendance had tapered down to a bare quorum, sought to have 
the town bylaws amended to provide for a larger quorum on those 
types of question that seemed particularly vulnerable to such 
action. The 1974 Annual Town Meeting acted by authorizing the 
Moderator to appoint a committee to study the matter and report 
back to the 1975 Annual Town Meeting. 

II. STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM 

One hundred voters can conduct business at a town meeting. Two 
thirds of this number is 67. Conceivably this small a group of 
voters could vote to take a person's land against his will by emi- 
nent domain, authorize the borrowing of millions of dollars, or 
rezone land for multiple residence or business (except for B-3 
Selected Light Industrial District, for which the number is 400). 
This small number has been challenged as inadequate to ensure fair 
and representative action on such important questions. 

III. ANALYSIS 

A. Safeguards of Town Meeting Integrity 

In considering what 67 voters might do at a town meeting, we 
need to consider how they got there and under what conditions they 
can operate. 

Not ice All voters in the town are given notice of matters to 
be taken up at a town meeting through a warrant pub- 
lished at least seven days before the meeting. 

Right of Attendance All registered voters have the right to 
attend any annual or special town meeting. 

46 



Right of Open Debate All voters present at a meeting have 
the right to be heard on any motion. Motions to 
limit or cut off debate require a two-thirds vote. 

Reconsideration A meeting may vote to reconsider an action 
they have taken. This right has been held to apply 
only at the session at which the original vote was 
taken. 

Special Town Meeting by Petition Two hundred voters can 
require the calling of a special town meeting by 
petition. Such a special meeting could be called 
to rescind action of a previous meeting if the action 
voted has not been carred out. 

B. Observations on Past Town Meetings in Lincoln 

A summary of town meeting attendance from 1968 to 1974 is in- 
cluded as Appendix A. From this chart it may be seen that the 
minimum attendance recorded at the first session of Annual Town 
Meeting was 350. Second and third sessions generally reflect lower 
attendance; 186 has been recorded at an adjourned meeting. An ini- 
tial attendance as low as 115 has been recorded at a special town 
meeting with only a single article on the warrant. 

Instances where the same major issue had been considered at two 
separate meetings were isolated. On the issue of the first addi- 
tion to the public library, a special town meeting was called to 
propose rescinding the original 67.9% vote to build the addition. 
At the second meeting there were 38% more voters present, 522 versus 
the original 377. The motion to rescind was opposed by 67%. On 
the issue of taking from the American Legion the land now used as a 
mini-park at Ridge Road and Lincoln Road, the matter lost at an 
Annual Town Meeting with 53% of the 621 voting opposed. At a subse- 
quent Special Town Meeting with 843 attending the measure passed 
with a 70.9% favorable vote. There were 36% more voters at the 
second meeting. See Appendix B. 

As usual, statistics don't prove anything -- they merely serve 
as fuel for argument. We infer that attendance at town meetings 
reflects the importance and interest of the issues. You can't keep 
people away from a big issue and you can't muster a big turnout for 
what is seen as a dull meeting. Accordingly we feel that it is 
more important to address those factors that affect the interest 
and efficiency of town meetings than to change the quorum. 



47 



C. Quorums in Other Communities 

A survey of quorum requirements in other towns in Massachusetts 
was made, see Appendix C. A wide disparity exists, from a low of 
3 voters to a high of 400 voters, or, where given as a percentage of 
registered voters, from a low of 1% to a high of 10%. We were left 
then to draw our conclusions on the basis of Lincoln's experience 
and on what would appear to be important here. 

D. Streamling Town Meeting 

Our discussion of quorums necessarily led to consideration of 
factors which affect attendance at Town Meeting. Recognizing that 
the length and tedium of meetings could adversely affect attendance 
we directed attention to ways of simplifying procedure and moving 
town meeting business along in a more expeditious manner. Any 
procedures that consume the time of the meeting without contributing 
to the understanding and resolution of the issues under consideratior 
should be dealt with. 



We are recommending two changes in the conduct of the meeting. 
These can be done now. The Moderator should omit the reading of 
articles in putting them before the meeting. The Town Clerk should 
appoint, instruct and station tellers before the meeting so any 
counted votes can be taken without delay. 

We are recommending for adoption this year a bylaw change that 
would permit use of a consent calendar procedure for dealing with 
uncontroversial articles. Similar procedures have been used else- 
where with good results. The one proposed for Lincoln would work 
like this: Several weeks before the meeting the Moderator would 
review the warrant, consulting with the Selectmen and other town 
officers, and identify those articles that appeared to be of a rou- 
tine and uncontroversial character. If the motions to be made at 
the meeting under each of those articles are available, then the 
articles. and the motions are published in a consent calendar. Brief 
explanations of the articles may be included. The consent calendar 
is mailed to each voter at least a week before the meeting. Each 
voter thus has the opportunity to determine what articles are pro- 
posed for simultaneous adoption and can ask any question he may have 
about any article before the meeting, and if he wishes to debate the 
article may mark it for holding out. 

At the meeting, probably immediately following consideration of 
the budget by a similar procedure, the Moderator puts the consent 
calendar before the meeting. After announcing consideration of it 

48 



he asks whether anyone wants any article held out to be considered 
in its normal place in the warrant. Any articles held out are de- 
leted from the consent calendar. When there are no further requests 
for holdouts, indicating that there is unanimous consent for voting 
on the remaining articles as a group, a motion is made something 
like: "MOVE, that the motions appearing in the consent calendar 
under articles (article numbers listed) be adopted as a group." 
After seconding of the motion the Moderator puts the question to a 
vote. There is no debate. A unanimous vote adopts all motions. 
After asking whether there is any further action under any of the 
listed articles, the Moderator then takes up the next article on 
the warrant. 

We further recommend that a committee be appointed to consider 
the possibility that the town officially adopt a parliamentary man- 
ual in order to clarify inconsistencies between official practice as 
set forth in these manuals and procedures as commonly practiced in 
Massachusetts town meetings. Two areas of inconsistency we have 
noted are the meaning of the motion "to table" and the procedure for 
reconsideration. Another possibility which should receive consid- 
eration would be to allow only one order of amendment. Presently 
the main motion may be amended and that amendment may be amended 
(2nd order amendment). For simplicity only the amendment to the 
main motion might be allowed and if defeated a new amendment could 
be moved. 

IV. CONCLUSIONS 

The committee regards as unlikely the prospect of a mischief- 
bent majority committing folly on any important issue or wreaking 
injustice on any fellow citizen at a sparsely attended meeting. If 
the issue is important, the attendance will be substantial. The 
extraordinary sensitivity to the prospect of injustice in an eminent 
domain taking without consent of the owner will ensure good attend- 
ance for such issues even where the cost of the taking is small and 
the owner obscure or unpopular. We feel also that large quorums 
do not command attendance but carry a risk of delaying or frustrat- 
ing action. Therefore we reached the following conclusions: 

1. A quorum of 100 is adequate for general business at town 
meetings. 

2. A quorum of 400 as presently required for B-3 rezoning 
action is excessive for any type of question and may serve 
to block consideration rather than ensuring adequate repre- 
sentation. Furthermore, action on B-3 zoning proposals, 

49 



while important, is not more so than action on other types 
of zoning changes and should operate under the same quorum 
requirement . 

3. A majority of the committee believes that a quorum of 100 
is sufficient for all business at town meetings. 

4. A minority holds that a higher quorum should apply to votes 
on the following types of questions: (a) taking property 
by eminent domain without consent of the owner; (b) com- 
mitting the town to bonded indebtedness; and (c) changing 
the zoning map. For those actions a quorum of 8% is pro- 
posed. This figure would require about 240 voters when 
the number of registered voters is 3000, and would rise as 
the number of registered voters rises. 

5. In order to afford the voters of the town an opportunity to 
choose between these two viewpoints , there should be arti- 
cles in the warrant embodying both. 

6. Attendance at town meetings is governed primarily by the 
content of the meetings. 

7. The efficiency with which the town meeting performs its 
business is a major factor in determining how many voters 
stay through the meeting. 

8. While a quorum requirement cannot generate attendance, 
improvements in the conduct of meetings will tend to 
increase it. The most significant area for action is 
to improve the interest and efficiency of town meetings. 

V. RECOMMENDATIONS (Unanimous except as noted) 

1. The quorum requirement should be set at 100 for all types 
of business (Majority recommendation). 

2. An alternate article embodying a basic quorum of 100 with 
a higher quorum for certain types of questions should be 
placed on the warrant (Minority recommendation) . 

3. A consent calendar procedure allowing the adoption of 
uncontroversial articles as a group by unanimous consent 
should be instituted. 

4. A committee of skilled parliamentarians should be appointed 

50 



to study and make recommendations on further steps for 
improving the efficiency of town meetings including: 

a. adoption of a parliamentary manual 

b. limiting the order of amendment allowed 

c. clarifying the right of reconsideration 

d. starting the Annual Town Meetings at 9:15 a.m. rather 
than 9:30 a.m. 

5. The Moderator should forthwith adopt the practice of not 
reading an article when it comes up, but identify it by 
number and then recognize the mover of the motion under 
the article. 

6. The Town Clerk should appoint, assign and instruct counters 
before the start of a meeting so that when a counted vote 
is required they can go into action without delay. 

7. We recommend the preparation and distribution to all voters 
of a Town Meeting Guide to improve the understanding of 
the rules, roles and practice at town meetings. (The Lin- 
coln League of Women Voters is preparing such a guide with 
the assistance of the Moderator and this committee.) 

The committee acknowledges with thanks the assistance and con- 
sultation of Charles Y. Wadsworth, former moderator, Kenneth E. 
Bergen, moderator, and Elizabeth J. Snelling. 



51 













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56 



APPENDIX C 
QUORUM REQUIREMENTS IN OTHER MASSACHUSETTS TOWNS 



A review of the towns near Lincoln revealed the following bylaw require- 
ments for quorums at town meetings: 







Quorum 




Town 


Population 
18,000 


Requirement 
None 


Comments 


Acton 




Bedford 


12,800 


150 




Carlisle 


3,100 


75 (thru 


1974) 
In 1974, voted to in- 
crease to 150; pending 
Attorney General approval 


Concord 


17,000 


3 




Sudbury 


15,047 


200 


Prior to 1973 was 5% of 
registered voters or ap- 
proximately 340 


Way land 


13,225 


100 




Weston 


11,000 


40 




Lexington 


33,412 


100* 


♦Representative Town Mtg. 



In addition, a survey of the bylaw requirements in other Massachusetts 
towns was conducted and the following is a representative selection of the 
results from towns in the same population range: 



Comments 







Quorum 


Town 


Population 


Requirement 


Longmeadow 


15,630 


50 


Webster 


14,957 


50 


Foxborough 


14,218 


100 


Clinton 


13,383 


300 


East Longmeadow 


13,029 


10% 


Westwood 


12,750 


175 


Hoi den 


12,564 


1% 


Sharon 


12,367 


None 


Ames bury 


11,388 


300 


Lynnfield 


10,826 


3% 


West ford 


10,368 


2% 


Mansfield 


9,939 


200 


Dudley 


8,087 


2% 


Cohasset 


6,954 


200 


Winchester 


6,635 


5% 


Hamilton 


6,373 


200 


Harwich 


5,892 


300 


Rockport 


5,636 


400/200 


Avon 


5,295 


5% 


Sandwich 


5,239 


25 


Groton 


5,109 


125 



Special Meeting - 250 



Quorum of 400 except that 
in any matter not in- 
volving financing the 
quorum is 200 



57 



FINANCE 

FINANCIAL SERVICES 

J. Timothy Grobleski, Financial Manager 



Being progressive in its government activities, after careful 
study, Lincoln has set up a new Financial Services Office. The 
primary purpose of this office is to oversee the Financial and 
Accounting functions done within the Town. 

A "first for Massachusetts" is how the office is viewed by 
people outside of Lincoln. Among the important reasons for this 
office is the need to eliminate the existing duplication of effort 
and to place employees with related work loads in the same office. 
For the first time in the State, both the Town and the School see 
a need to combine efforts and to progress together. Through a 
new organization, a new structure, and cooperation, this office is 
moving forward. 

In July, the Treasurer, Collector and Town Accountant moved 
their offices to Center School. The Town Accountant has an office 
with the bookkeepers of the school department. Residents of the 
Town were lost at first, when trying to pay a bill or call the Town 
Hall with a question concerning an excise tax payment. 

A major part of the reorganization is more extensive use of a 
computer. A study was undertaken developing the alternatives of 
in-house equipment. Costs were weighed against volume, and the 
obvious solution was to farm out the work load to a service bureau. 
Taxes, payroll and water billing are presently done by computer ser 
vices. Within the coming year, a complete system will be ready to 
computerize all of the Town's bookkeeping. 

Extensive use of a computer will give Town administrators de- 
tailed reports. These reports will be the main ingredients for 
future budgeting and a source for controlling costs. 

A new fiscal period, made mandatory by the State, is being 
used. This, being the implementation year, made both reporting 
and budgeting more difficult. On the other hand, the semi-annual 
tax billing will limit, if not eliminate, borrowing in anticipation 
of taxes. Excess cash is being watched closely, and the cash flow 
is being analyzed to allow for maximum investments. 



58 



Many changes have taken place, and many more will come about 
in the future. Participation by the people in Lincoln has been, 
in a word, "great". This attitude by townspeople, mixed with a 
strong desire to serve the people, which is felt by the employees 
of the Town, will give Lincoln a sound financial future. 



59 



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60 



Cash balance 6/30/74: 


General 
Funds 


Revenue 
Sharing 


Water 


Total 








Harvard Trust Co. 


$ 56,279.80 


$ 


$16,054.41 


$ 72,334.21 


First National Bank 


1,854.02 






1,854.02 


Lexington Trust 


14,863.23 






14,863.23 


N. E. Merchants Nat'l 


47,336.74 






47,336.74 


Newton-Waltham Bank 
§ Trust 


3,612.88 






3,612.88 


Newton-Waltham Bank 
£ Trust (Savings) 




62,678.18 




62,678.18 


Concord Coop. Bank 


6,000.00 






6,000.00 


Belmont Savings Bank 


9,605.21 






9,605.21 


Beverly Savings Bank 


10,550.71 






10,550.71 


Boston 5$ Savings Bank 


1,919.97 






1,919.97 


Brookline Savings Bank 


5,345.79 






5,345.79 


Cambridge Savings Bank 


11,499.06 






11,499.06 


Charlestown Savings Bk. 


3,089.57 






3,089.57 


Lynn 5{ Savings Bank 


10,827.25 






10,827.25 


Newton Savings Bank 


10,871.76 






10,871.76 


Provident Inst, for 
Savings 


692.77 






692.77 


Waltham Savings Bank 


6,555.08 






6,555.08 


Certificate of Deposit 
due 7/1/74 


300,000.00 






300,000.00 


Certificate of Deposit 
due 8/7/74 


300,000.00 






300,000.00 


Certificate of Deposit 
due 8/9/74 


100,000.00 
$900,903.84 






100,000.00 




$62,678.18 


$16,054.41 


$979,636.43 



Frederick B. Taylor 
Town Treasurer 



61 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 

Julia A. Bemis $ 300.00 

William H. Benjamin 500.00 

Marie H. Bisbee 200.00 

Mildred E. Bowles 200.00 

Agnes L. Brown 300.00 

George Browning 200.00 

Sarah J. Browning 200.00 

Elizabeth G. Chapin 300.00 

Robert B. Chapin 300.00 

William H. Costello 100.00 

Mary H. Cushing 100.00 

Anthony J. Doherty 500.00 

Paul Dorian 150.00 

Charles P. Farnsworth 350.00 

Edward R. Farrar 300.00 

Francis Flint 250.00 

Orila J. Flint 300.00 

Donald Gordon 300.00 

Raymond E. Hagerty 150.00 

George Harrington 100.00 

Samuel Hartwell 300.00 

Thomas Huddleston 200.00 

Abijah G. Jones 300.00 

M. Gertrude Kelley 300.00 

John J. Kelliher 200.00 

Byron Lunt 300.00 

Gardner Moore 300.00 

Lena M. Newell 325.00 

Joa Pacewicz 400.00 

John H. Pierce 500.00 

Anne D. Pollard 300.00 

Charles 0. Preble 100.00 

Annie A. Ray 300.00 

Mary Susan Rice 87.27 

E. H. Rogers 250.00 

Mary James Scripture 500.00 

Eugene Sherman 200.00 

Charles S. Smith 300.00 

J. Waldo Smith 300.00 

Webster Smith 300.00 

Helen 0. Storrow 2,000.00 

George G. Tarbell 400.00 

Laura B. & Arthur E. Thiessen 500.00 

Maria L. Thompson 500.00 

Mabel H. Todd 200.00 

Ellen T. Trask 200.00 

Albert Washburn 500.00 

Elizabeth S. Wheeler 200.00 

Ellen F. Whitney 100.00 

Lewis W. Woodworth 150.00 

$15,612.27 



62 



Perpetual Care Fund income accumulated 

at January 1, 1974 $ 8,099.27 

1974 interest income received 1,296.73 

Accumulated income at December 31, 1974 $ 9,396.00 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1974 $ 5.55 

Interest income in 1974 17.65 

$ 23720 

Less bank interest allowed to accumulate 17.65 

Cash balance at December 31, 1974 $ 5.55 



Bank Deposits at December 31, 1974 

First National Bank of Boston $ 5.55 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 340.96 

$ 346.51 



LINCOLN STABILIZATION FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1974 $ 32.71 

Interest income in 1974 13.73 

$ 46.44 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 13.73 



Cash balance at December 31, 1974 $ 32.71 



Bank Balances at December 31, 1974 

First National Bank of Boston $ 32.71 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 265.39 

$ 298.10 



63 



OUTSTANDING DEBT AT JUNE 30, 1974 

80,000.00 School Project Loan, 3.60%, due $20,000 each October 1, 
1974-1977, issued under the Acts of 1948 

60,000.00 School Project Loan, 3.70%, due $10,000 each November 1, 
1974-1979, issued under the Acts of 1948 

315,000.00 School Project Loan, 2.90%, due $35,000 each November 15, 
1974-1982, issued under the Acts of 1948 

45,000.00 School Project Loan, 3.10%, due $5,000 each November 15, 
1974-1982, issued under the Acts of 1948 

525,000.00 School Project Loan, 4.00%, due $50,000 each April 1, 
1975-1980, and $45,000 each April 1, 1981-1985, issued 
under Chapter 44, General Laws 



$ 1,025,000.00 Total School Loans 

20,000.00 Fire and Police Station Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000 each 

October 1, 1974-1977, issued under Chapter 44, General 
Laws 

90,000.00 Municipal Purposes Loan, 4.00%, due $20,000 each April 1, 
1975-1976, and $10,000 each April 1, 1977-1981, issued 
under Chapter 44, General Laws 

40,000.00 Conservation Loan, 3.50%, due $5,000 each March 1, 1975- 
1982, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 

40,000.00 Conservation Loan, 4.10%, due $10,000 each November 1, 
1974-1977, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 

295,000.00 Conservation Land Loan, 4.50%, due $45,000 each June 15, 
1975-1977, and $40,000 each June 15, 1978-1981, issued 
under Chapter 44, General Laws 

130,000.00 Militzer-Norton Conservation Loan, 4.35%, due $130,000 
April 1, 1975 

110,000.00 Swimming Pool Loan, 4.60%, due $10,000 each April 1, 
1975-1985 



$1,840,000.00 NET DEBT 

7,000.00 Water Loan, 3.00%, due August 1, 1974 

25,000.00 Water Loan, 3.00%, due $5,000 each August 15, 1974-1978 

10,000.00 Water Loan, 3.50%, due $5,000 each May 1, 1975-1976 

50,000.00 Water Loan, 5.50%, due $5,000 each June 15, 1975-1984 

15,000.00 Water Loan, 4.40%, due $5,000 each August 1, 1974-1976 

25,000.00 Water Loan, 5.60%, due $5,000 each August 15, 1974-1978 



$1,972,000.00 TOTAL DEBT 

64 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Lois McClure Light 



Current 
Personal 
Real Estate 



Prior Years 
Personal 
Real Estate 



CURRENT REVENUE 
January 1, 1973 - June 30, 1974 

$ 402,200.88 
4,137,101.38 



730.21 
58,067.34 



From State 
Tax reimbursements 
School aid, Chapter 70 
Aid to Regional School District 
Local Aid - Lottery- 
Special Education 
Chapter 812, Census 
Loss of taxes 

Dept. of Corp. - local taxes 
Special gas tax 



In lieu of taxes 
Farrington Memorial 
Massachusetts Port Authority- 
Bethany 



1,630.54 

239,258.19 

24,944.44 

13,979.54 

97,532.00 

1,244.00 

71,238.42 

795.46 

16,459.57 



1,700.00 
25,000.00 



$ 4,539,302.26 



58,797.55 



467,082.16 



29,814.09 



Fines 
Court 

Licenses and Permits 
Licenses 
Permits 



Grants £ Gifts - Federal 
Air Force School 
Storefront - Title III 
Sidetrack - Title III 
Interdistrict Transfer Program 
U. S. District Court 
Revenue Sharing, P. L. 52-512 



79.00 
8,883.96 



1,729 


425 


39 


68 


427 


00 


42 


290 


00 


745 


668 


00 




55 


39 


97 


,302 


10 



3,043.00 



8,962.96 



2,683,167.88 



65 



Grants from State 
School: 

Transportation 
Building assistance 
Metco - Chapter 506 
Title II - ESEA 
Title VI - 74-157013 
Title VI - 74-157101 
Title III 



83,581.52 

52,007.95 

196,292.50 

2,823.18 

6,937.00 

3,000.00 

15,410.00 



$ 360,052.15 



Grants from State 
Other Purposes: 

Right of Way Bureau - Property 
Governor ' s Safety Bureau 
Library Aid 
Highways S2 - Ch. 1140 



Grants from County 
Dog Fund 



168.00 

1,250.00 

5,675.26 

24,000.00 



31,093.26 
2,693.27 



Privileges 

Motor Vehicle Tax 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 



Farm Animal Excise 



615.91 

69,897.39 

195,408.16 

12,249.23 



278,170.69 
65.86 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen 

Treasurer § Collector 

Assessors 

Town Clerk 

Planning Board 

Board of Appeals 

Conservation Commission 

Town Hall 



2,136.82 

2,141.00 

219.50 

1,446.03 

485.00 

170.00 

285.00 

15.00 







PUBLIC 


SAFETY 






Police 


Department 










Insurance reports 






623. 


50 


Attendance officer 






240 


00 


Fire 


Arms ID 






28. 


00 


Sale 


motorcycle 






265 


00 



6,898.35 



1,156.50 



66 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 



Dog Inoculations 
Garbage collection 
Recycling 



684.00 

13,904.20 

1,258.40 



S 15,846.60 



Chapter 90 

Chapter 90 
County- 
State 

Sale of truck 

Reimbursements 



Maintenance 
Construction: 



HIGHWAYS 



VETERANS 



6,000.00 

2,849.22 

1,599.73 

50.00 

987.00 



11,485.95 



Veterans' benefits 



3,344.47 



SCHOOLS 



Rental classrooms 

Tuition 

Air Force Cafeteria 

School lunch program 

Special education tuition 



590.00 

6,325.00 

49,938.71 

29,848.07 

3,000.00 



89,701.78 



LIBRARY 



Lost books 
Fines 



560.41 
4,650.54 



5,210.95 



RECREATION 



Day Camp 
Ski program 
Golf program 
Square dancing 
Sale of pool 



15,508.10 

152.00 

90.24 

465.50 

355.00 



16,570.84 



CEMETERIES 



Sale of lots 

Interments 

Miscellaneous 



2,425.00 

1,560.00 

188.00 



4.173.00 



67 



UNCLASSIFIED 

DeCordova reimbursement - State audit $ 656.60 
Air Force School reimbursement 44,588.87 



INTEREST 

Interest on taxes 5,483.66 

Interest on deposits 4,360.99 

Interest on investments 51,102.81 



AGENCY TRUST 5 INVESTMENTS 

Dog licenses 4,243.00 

Grammar School Fund 97.57 

DeCordova School Equipment Fund 1,237.77 

Deputy Collector 1,631.78 

Fish § Game Licenses 2,636.25 

Sale of Dogs, Due County 41.00 

Custody of dogs 75.00 

Agency Account, Police Detail 11,299.85 

Agency Account, Pierce House 2,150.00 

Agency Account, Telephone Company 7,500.00 

Agency Account, Garland Camp 5,826.00 

Agency Account, Flu Shots 260.60 

Agency Account, Conservation 9,203.50 

Agency Account, Codman Barn 24,692.79 

Agency Account, Recreation 939.90 

Agency Account, Public Works 2,171.50 

Agency Account, Militzer Land 7,000.00 

Agency Account, Codman Community Farm 13.95 

Agency Account, Employee Deductions 6,021.54 

Agency Account, Codman Trustees - 

Swimming Pool 5,000.00 

Agency Account, Swimming Pool 7,822.50 

Surplus Cash Investments 4,550,000.00 

Employee deductions 511,070.91 

Premium on loans 219.80 



$ 45,245.47 



60,947.46 



5,161,155.21 



REFUNDS 

Refunds § reimbursements 11,376.65 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 

Tax anticipation notes 1,300,000.00 

Swimming pool loan 110,000.00 

Nelson land 100,000.00 

Serial loan 130,000.00 

1,640,000.00 



68 



Total General Receipts $15,535,358.36 

Cash Balance, January 1, 1973 496,546.37 

$16,031,904.73 

WATER RECEIPTS 

Water rates S 99,647.52 

Hydrant service 36,563.00 

Connections 24,200.20 

Miscellaneous 1,293.81 

Refunds 167.00 

Water bond 25,000.00 

Agency Account, Vo-Tech School 16,000.00 

202,871.53 

Cash Balance, January 1, 1973 14,488.90 

$ 217,360.43 

Grand Total, Current Revenue $16,249,265.16 



69 



EXPENDITURES 

Payments on Selectmen's Warrants 
January 1 , 1973 - June 30, 1974 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen $ 2,203.02 

Executive Secretary 27,400.54 

Finance Committee 78.36 

Financial Administration 8,017.82 

Town Offices 45,205.76 

Town Accountant 14,246.52 

Treasurer 6, Collector 39,371.45 

Assessors 10,689.94 

Legal 13,425.88 

Town Clerk 546.49 

Election § Registration 4,206.69 

Planning Board 6,687.19 

Board of Appeals 451.09 

Conservation Commission 10,203.00 

Consulting § Engineering 26,981.47 

Town Hall 16,954.69 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS § PROPERTY 

Police 226,514.66 

Fire 155,261.36 

Communications 52,111.36 

Civil Defense 439.41 

Fire § Police Bldg. 10,006.84 

Inspectors of Buildings 13,359.08 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Salaries 19,265.20 

Expense 9,947.02 

Inspection service 2,809.92 

Garbage collection 14,660.23 

Dog Officer d, expense 1,249.30 



226,669.91 



457,692.71 



47,931.67 



70 



PUBLIC WORKS 



Public Works - General 

Public Works building 

Bicycle Path - Art. 21 

Bicycle Path - Art. 1 

Pickup truck 

Public Works equipment - Art. 9 

Trapelo Road Bicycle Path - Art. 11 

Alterations to Bldg. - Art. 10 

New equipment - Art. 11 

Chapter 90 maintenance 

Chapter 90 construction 



331,328.64 

10,732.87 

400.18 

11,118.52 

5,126.00 
10,500.00 
13,400.85 

5,406.50 
10,465.00 

9,000.00 
15,420.73 



$ 422,899.29 



CHARITIES 



Veterans' service, 1972 
Veterans' service 



98.53 
11,373.18 



11,471.71 



EDUCATION 



Elementary Schools 

Regional High School 

Vo-Tech High School 

School, 1972 

School repairs, Art. 9 

Smith School renovation, Art. 1 

Brooks School Field House, Art. 2 

Fire detectors-heat sensors, Art. 19 

Met co - Chapter 506 

Sidetrack 

Storefront 

Interdistrict Transfer Program 

Grant VI - 74-157-013 

Grant VI - 74-157-101 

Title III 

Bureau Library Ext. - Title II 

Library - Title II - ESEA 

Bureau Library Ext. - Title II - ESEA 

Air Force School 



2,165,752.14 

1,052,375.18 

35,556.00 

2,517.37 

1,234.00 

2,306.45 

1,193.55 

2,246.50 

137,335.33 

56,685.25 

68,427.00 

628,300.81 

6,169.24 

545.00 

8,354.95 

475.47 

1,635.00 

9.28 

2,225,460.74 



LIBRARY 



Library 

Library building 
Library repairs, Art. 26 
Library repairs, Art. 27 



109,499.30 

21,005.32 

822.00 



137,471.91 



71 



Salaries 
Expense 



RECREATION 



CEMETERIES 



20,167.79 
8,382.08 



28,549.87 



Interments 
Maintenance & expense 



1,148.78 
9,462.50 



10,611.28 



TOWN DEBT SERVICE 



Bond payments 

Interest on bonds 

Interest on tax anticipation notes 



Motor Vehicle Excise 
Real Estate Tax 
Personal Property 
General 



REFUNDS 



335,000.00 

103,447.50 

24,961.58 



8,711.77 

6,633.28 

93,501.58 

113.00 



463,409.08 



108,959.63 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Middlesex County Pension Fund 

Employee Hospital § Insurance Fund 

Property § Indemnity Insurance 

Town Reports 

Celebration Committee 

SILC membership 

EEO Committee 

Assessors maps, Art. 25 

Bicentennial, Art. 24 

Brooks School fire 

Heat sensors, Art. 12 

Purchase Nelson land, Art. 3 

Regional Refuse Disposal Committee 

Bicentennial, Art. 25 

Unpaid bills, Art. 30 

Additional fireman, Art. 9 

Unpaid bills, Art. 14 

Dog Pound, Art. 13 

Mill Street, Art. 4 

Purchase Norton land, Art. 11 



68,568.00 

62,308.30 

71,886.90 

6,085.32 

3,394.24 

28.29 

34.02 

1,340.34 

106.67 

1,489.94 

9,361.59 

109,830.00 

27.90 

2,500.00 

1,627.55 

13,000.00 

121.41 

4,797.55 

1,000.00 

60,000.00 



417,508.02 



72 



AGENCY TRUST $ INVESTMENTS 



Dog licenses, d 


me County 


$ 3,525.45 






Milk Fund 




14,129.31 






Hanscom School 


Cafeteria 


75,731.49 






Tax anticipation notes 


1,300,000.00 






State audit 




3,075.29 






County Hospital 


assessment 


18,863.14 






County tax 




164,117.95 






Motor Vehicle Excise bills 


531.90 






MAPC 




378.00 






State Parks § Reservations 


19,658.54 






MBTA 




76,090.74 






Metropolitan Air Pollution Control 


226.94 






Agency Account, 


W/E 


1,587.38 






Division of Fisheries § Game 


2,749.50 






Agency Account, 


Police Detail 


11,371.10 






Agency Account, 


Flu Shots 


260.60 






Agency Account, 


Telephone Company 


7,500.00 






Agency Account, 


Pierce House 


2,050.00 






Agency Account, 


Highways 


2,171.50 






Agency Account, 


Recreation 


364.67 






Agency Account, 


Codman Barn 


20,223.54 






Agency Account, 


Conservation 


8,442.82 






Agency Account, 


Codman Trustees, 








Swimming Pool 




96,240.00 






Agency Account, 


Sale of Dogs 


26.00 






Agency Account, 


Farrar Pond 


32.19 






Agency Account, 


Swimming Pool 


337.15 






Premium on Nelson land § swimming pool 


146.80 






Surplus cash investment 


4,700,000.00 












$ 6,529,832 


00 




EMPLOYEE 


DEDUCTIONS 






Employee deduct 


ions 
res 




511,098 


87 


Total Expenditu 


$15,770,685 


21 


Cash balance, June 30, 1974 




263,582 


.02 



$16,034,267.23 



73 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Salaries $ 337.50 

Wages 45,990.82 

Expense 64,624.98 

Bonds 38,000.00 

Interest 8,935.00 

Refunds 55.22 

Mill Street, Art. 4 25,000.00 

Agency Account 16,000.00 



Cash balance, June 30, 1974 



198,943.52 



Total, Water Department $ 214,997.93 

Grand Total Expenditures 16,249,265.16 



74 






TOWN OF LINCOLN 

BALANCE SHEET 
Januarv 1, 1973 - June 30. 1974 



Assets 



Cash: 








Revenue 








General 


$ 237 


,730.61 




General P. L. 92-512 


25 


,851.41 




Water 


16 


,054.41 


$ 279,636.43 


Surplus Cash Investments 






700,000.00 


Advances for Petty Cash: 








Collector 




20.00 




Treasurer 




100.00 




Police 




25.00 




School Administration 




50.00 




School Instruction 




150.00 




Air Force School 




150.00 




Air Force School Cafeteria 




30.00 




Library- 




15.00 




Educational Study #23 




50.00 




Recreation 




100.00 





690.00 



Accounts Receivable: 
Taxes 

Levy of 1970 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1971 
Personal 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1972 
Personal 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1973-74 
Personal 
Real Estate 



Farm Animal Excise 



105.20 

59.84 
108.80 

96.33 
1,378.32 

124.92 



56,205.70 
3.25 



Tax Titles and Possessions 
Tax Titles 



649.66 



Motor Vehicle Excise 
Levy of 1971 
Levy of 1972 
Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1974 



750.94 

925.73 

1,964.10 

56,226.34 



59,867.11 



75 



ASSETS (Continued) 

Departmental 

Board of Health - Garbage Collection $ 364.37 
Veterans' Services 375.20 



Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund 

Donald Gordon Recreation Fund 

Division of Fisheries § Game 
Codman Community Farm 
Farrar Pond Village 
Police Detail 



Provided for or Overdrawn Accounts: 
Underestimates 1973-1974 
"County Tax 5,271.05 

County Hospital 10,823.47 



739.57 



Water 

Rates, 1973-74 1,468.66 

Aid to Highways 
State 
County 



Loans Authorized 
Conservation 

Overlay Deficits 
Levy of 1970 
Levy of 1971 
Levy of 1973-74 



16,304.66 




7,288.94 






23,593.60 




130,000.00 


936.28 




7,274.82 




7,943.47 






16,154.57 




2,500.00 




250.00 


113.25 




18.36 




32.19 




26.25 





190.05 



16,094.52 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt: 
Inside Debt Limit 

General 1,210,000.00 

Outside Debt Limit 

General 500,000.00 

Public Service Enterprises 130,000.00 

630,000.00 

Revenue 1974-75 3,721,346.33 

Transfer Several Accounts 144,407.30 

Water Receipts (to be collected) 132,400.00 

Total $7,126,196.75' 

76 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

BALANCE SHEET 
January 1, 1973 - June 30, 1974 

Liabilities and Reserves 



In anticipation of Serial 


Issue 




$ 130,000.00 


Agency: 








County Dog Licenses 




$ 763.20 




Sale of Dogs 




6.00 




Custody of Dogs 




84.00 




Unidentified Federal Ta> 


[ Refund 


83.43 




Militzer Land 




7,000.00 




Swimming Pool 




26,245.35 




Codman Barn 




4,501.56 




Conservation 




760.68 




Recreation 




575.23 




Pierce House 




100.00 




Lieu of Taxes 




3,114.09 




Employee Deductions 




6,021.54 




Insurance 




6,013.87 




Deputy Fees 




44.40 


55,313.35 


Tailings: 








Unclaimed Checks 




878.71 




Unidentified Auditors Receipts 


9.07 










887.78 


Trust Fund Income: 








Julian DeCordova School 


Equipment Fund 


1,237.77 




Grammar School Fund 




81.14 


1,318.91 


Premium on Loans 






73.00 


Accrued Interest 




28.33 




Interest on General Bonds 




39.17 





67.50 



Federal Grants: 
School 

Interdistrict Transfer Program 
Bureau of Library Ext. Title II 
P. L. 874, Title I, Impact '69 
Title VI, P. L. 91-230 
Title VI, B 74-157-013 
Title III, S. P. L. 230 
Met co, Chapter 506 
Operation Air Force School 



121,116.19 

726.26 

1,750.00 

767.76 

2,455.00 

7,055.05 

60,068.66 

81,743.89 



275,682.81 



77 






Liabilities and Reserves (Continued) 



Revolving Funds: 

Air Force School Cafeteria 
Lunch Program 



Appropriations : 
Revenue 
Revenue 1974-75 Special 



Overestimates, 1973-1974: 
State Parks 
MBTA 
Air Pollution 



Receipts Received for Appropriations: 

State Grants 

Aid to Libraries 5,675.26 

Conservation Land Reimbursement 39,349.35 

Cemetery Improvement Fund 24,945.19 



$ 275.03 






2,898.37 








$ 


3,173.40 


143,567.53 






74,855.51 




218,423.04 


2,873.75 






13.26 






96.36 







2,983.37 



69,969.80 



Receipts Received for Appropriations: 
County Grant 

County Dog Fund 1,641.72 



serve Fund Overlay Surplus 


4,105.60 




Overlay 


473.12 


4,578.72 


venue Reserved until Collected: 






Motor Vehicle Excise 


59,867.11 




Departmental 


739.57 




Aid to Highways 


23,593.60 




Water 


1,468.66 




Tax Title 


79.69 




Farm Animal Excise Revenue 


3.25 


85,751.88 


tty Cash 




690.00 


irplus Revenue: 






General 


288,972.41 




General P. L. 92-512 


22,431.10 




Water 


21,084.33 




Highway, Chapter 1140 


13,000.00 


345,487.84 



78 



Liabilities and Reserves (Continued) 

Net Funded or Fixed Debt: 
Inside Debt Limit 

Fire £ Police Station $ 20,000.00 

School 525,000.00 

Land Acquisition 465,000.00 

Municipal 90,000.00 

Swimming Pool 110,000.00 



$ 1,210,000.00 



Outside Debt Limit 

School 500,000.00 

Water 150,000.00 

630,000.00 

Appropriation Control, 1974-1975 3,868,053.63 

Appropriation Control, Special Accounts 89,700.00 

Appropriation Control, Water 132,400.00 

Total $ 7,126,196.75 



BORROWING CAPACITY 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has changed the method of computing 
the borrowing capacity for municipalities. The present formula is 
figured at 5% of the equalized valuation set for the Town by the Common- 
wealth. 



79 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

J. Thomas Franklin 

Joseph Howard 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 

1974 will be remembered by the Assessors as: (1) the year of two tax 
rates - the six-month rate for the end of the eighteen-month fiscal year 
change-over period, and the twelve-month rate for the new fiscal period, 
July '74 through June '75. Also it will be remembered as the give-away 
period - no assessments for new buildings and renovations made after Jan- 
uary 1, 1973 being billed until the new fiscal year '74- '75. Thank good- 
ness, this situation is over, and we may now get back to a routine for 
valuation of properties, although still those buildings started after the 
first day of any year do not get taxed until July of the subsequent year. 
It is hoped that legislation will be enacted to allow valuations to be 
made on a fiscal year basis. 

(2) The completion of "project map". The town now has its topo- 
graphic atlas, 200 scale, 24 sheets, completed several years ago, and now 
its' counterpart - the property map atlas, 100 scale, 130 sheets, completed 
this year. 

(3) The preparation of tax bills by data processing. This change 
did not come about without its many headaches and extra checking of the 
first several print-outs to get "accurate results. Mrs. Snelling is to 
be commended for keeping her cool through the many hours of checking in 
order to gain proper results. 

(4) The active participation of the members of the Board in several 
educational programs geared to better their assessment knowledge and the 
legal aspects of the office. Courses were attended in tax laws pertain- 
ing to the assessors, as well as appraisal process seminars, and a week's 
schooling at the Assessors' School at the University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst. 

(5) The Christmas present on December 24th of the Court decision 
mandating the Department of Corporations and Taxation and the Tax Commission 
to see that all of the 351 cities and towns of Massachusetts assess on a 
full and fair market value and equitably. While the Board was initially 
contemplating some across-the-board upping of values for the next tax year, 
1975-76, it will now hold off until the 1976-77 tax year to implement the 
new mandate. This will give the Board time to get approval from the Tax 
Commission on our methods to be used, and to give us the time to probably 
put out a special valuation list of all properties prior to the setting of 
the 1976-77 tax rate. This special listing would allow all property own- 
ers an opportunity to contact the Board as to the new valuations prior to 
setting the tax rate. This program would be similar to that used in the 
revaluation period of 1965-66. 

While we normally report on the ups and downs of the cherry sheet as 
it affects the tax rate, let it suffice that we hope the days of supple-, 
mental cherry sheets are over, such as we have been plagued with the past 

80 



two years. Such sheets have meant that either we set a tax rate without 
having complete cherry sheet figures, or that we delay the tax rate await- 
ing additional cherry sheet figures, thus getting our tax bills out at too 
late a date. 

You, the taxpayer, should be kept abreast of all legislation concern- 
ing assessing matters. We generally list in this report some of the basic 
data as to when to get in abatements and such. Facing an increase in 
valuations mandated by the Court, the matter of land used for farming may 
be subject to such action. If you have property which might come under 
the agricultural or horticultural legislation enacted in 1973, it might be 
to your advantage to apply to the board for such use. As this applica- 
tion must be in by October 1st of each year, those interested should be 
considering it shortly. In general, to qualify for this program, one 
must have five acres as a minimum devoted to agricultural and horticultural 
use and have a gross sales of the crops raised amounting to $500 per annum, 
and further the land must have been devoted to such crop raising for two 
years immediately preceding the year for which the application is presented. 

Listed below are some of the general regulations dealing with excise 
and real estate taxes as they are applicable in the Town. 

1. The status of property on January 1 is the determinant of the 
tax in any year. 

2. All real estate and personal property tax abatement applications 
must be filed with the Board by October 1 of the year involved. 

3. Motor vehicle and trailer excise tax abatement applications 
must be filed with the Board by July 1 of the year succeeding 
the year involved. If cars are changed during the year, it 

is the taxpayer's responsibility to file an abatement amplica- 
tion. 

4. Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41, of the General Laws, as 
amended, provides for certain real estate tax exemptions for 
taxpayers who meet certain age, financial, etc., qualifications. 
Additional information may be obtained from the Assessors' 
office. All applications under Clause 41 must be filed with 
the Board by December 15 of the year involved. 

5. Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41A, provides for the deferral 
of real estate tax payments in certain instances. Additional 
information may be obtained from the Assessors' office. All 
applications under this clause must be filed by December 15 of 
the year involved. 

6. Veterans with 10% or more disability, holders of Purple Heart 
awards, and others, may qualify for a partial exemption. Addi- 
tional information about these exemptions may be obtained from 
the Assessors' office. 



81 



The 1973 Town Report shows the figures for the 18-months fiscal period 
from January 1, 1973, through June 30, 1974, as well as the tax rate for 
calendar year ($63.80). These same figures were used to establish the 
tax rate for the 6-months period from January 1, 1974, through June 30, 
1974, except that the total valuation figure was increased from $48,538,760 
to $49,364,705. The 6-months tax rate was set at $31.20. 



1974-1975 Recapitulation 

Total appropriations to be raised by taxation $3,721,346.33 

Total appropriations to be taken from available funds 417,928.71 

Overlay deficits of previous years 17,284.01 

State recreation areas 28,794.20 

MBTA 59,948.00 

Motor vehicle excise bills 773.40 

Air Pollution Control District 446.70 

MAPC 378.00 

Special Education (1972 - 766) 3,000.00 

County Tax 173,343.77 

1973-1974 Underestimate, County Tax 5,271.05 

County Hospital 14,029.86 

Offsets to Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 183,210.34 

Overlay current fiscal year 51,281.49 

Gross Amount to be Raised $4,677,035.86 

Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 

Estimated receipts from local aid and agency funds 840,319.50 

Motor vehicle and trailer excise 223,361.00 

Licenses 5,863.00 

Fines 2,308.00 

General Government 4,247.00 

Health and sanitation 10,666.00 

School (local receipts) 5,205.00 

Library (local receipts) 3,382.00 

Recreation 9,273.00 

Cemeteries 3,218.00 

Interest 21,915.00 

All other 772.00 

Overestimates, 1973-1974 2,983.37 

Amounts voted to be taken from available funds 492,784.22 

Total estimated receipts and available funds 1,626,297.09 

Amount to be raised by taxation 3,050,738.77 

$4,677,035.86 

82 



Total valuation: 

Personal Property $ 4,126,505 at $61.80 $ 255,018.01 

Real Estate 45,238,200 at $61.80 2,795,720.76 

$49,364,705 $3,050,738.77 



Number of acres of land assessed 5,993.39 

Number of dwelling houses assessed: 

(including apartment houses) 1,310 



Tax rate per thousand (1974-1975): 

School rate $34.80 

General rate 27.00 $61.80 



83 



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85 



Protection of Persons and Property 



FIRE AND POLICE DEPARTMENTS 
Daniel A. Maclnnis , Jr. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a list of activities of the Lincoln Police 
Department for the year 1974. 

Arrests by the Lincoln Police 73 

Violations of Motor Vehicle Law 850 

Total Fines Paid $7,391.25 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 242 

Occupants Injured 84 

Occupants Killed 1 

Burglaries 60 

Larcenies Investigated 221 

Night Checks on Buildings 14,600 

Dog Complaints 968 

Permits for air rifle issued 6 

Permits to carry firearms issued 37 

License to sell firearms 2 

Log items recorded 15,474 

Stolen checks and listings 1,537 

Burglar alarms answered 893 

Ambulance calls 185 

In June 1974 Officer Richard Hallett received an Associate in 
Science Degree from Massachusetts Bay Community College. Sergeant 
David Davis, Inspector Steven Ziegler, Officer John Fitzgerald and 
Officer David Finan are continuing their studies toward degrees in 
Law Enforcement. Officer James Blackburn received his Law Degree 
in June 1974 from Suffolk Law School and recently passed the Mass- 
achusetts Bar Examination and is presently a member of the Massa- 
chusetts Bar Association. 

86 



Sergeant David Davis and Firefighter Richard Goddard completed 
Emergency Medical Technician training and have passed the National 
Registry Examination. Officer David Finan is currently completing 
EMT training and will be taking the National Registry Examination 
in the near future. This will make five members of the Fire and 
Police Departments registered EMT's. 

Officer David Finan graduated from the Waltham Police Academy 
in December 1974, having successfully completed the Basic Training 
Course required for police officers under Chapter 697 of the Acts 
of 1972. All members of the Lincoln Police Department have now 
completed the Basic Training Course. 

Lincoln shows a sharp increase in housebreaks in 1974; however, 
the increase is not as sharp as that of our neighboring towns. This 
is a result of the continuing cooperation of Lincoln residents in 
reporting the presence of suspicious persons. 

In May 1974 a teletype machine was installed linking the 
Police Department with computers and Police Agencies throughout the 
country. 

In April 1975 we are facing the bicentennial. The increase 
in traffic in the Town could cause major traffic jams. Lincoln 
residents are urged to take advantage of bussing programs to the 
celebration in Concord and Lexington which will be arranged and 
announced by the Lincoln Bicentennial Commission. Residents are 
also urged not to tie up emergency telephones at the Fire and Police 
Station by calling for information on bicentennial events on the 
April 19th weekend. A special number will be published by the 
Bicentennial Commission with a recorded announcement of events, or 
listen to local radio and television stations for times and places 
of celebrations. 

At the present time the Lincoln Auxiliary Police Department is 
being reactivated under the direction of Civil Defense Director 
Alanson H. Sturgis, Jr. The Auxiliary Police has not been active, 
in Lincoln, since World War II. The Auxiliary Police will be 
utilized for traffic control for the Bicentennial and also to aug- 
ment the regular police department in case of future emergencies. 
Any resident interested in becoming a member is urged to contact 
Director Sturgis or Deputy Chief Charles Doyle at the Police Sta- 
tion. 



87 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

During 1974 the Fire Department answered a total of 619 calls 
as listed below: 

Aircraft in trouble 4 

Brush or woods 37 

Outside burning 13 

Smoke Investigation 11 

M/V accident 117 

Water Problems 7 

Wires down or Arcing 27 

Lockouts 15 

Building fires 38 

M/V fires 43 

Assist Ambulance 47 

Miscellaneous and Special Services 156 

False or Accidental 31 

Fire Inspections 53 

Drills at schools 17 

Mutual Aid 1 

Bomb Threats 2 

TOTAL 619 



The Fire Department inspected and issued permits as follows: 

Agricultural Permits 445 

Gasoline Storage Permits 3 

Oil Tank Permits 42 

Oil Burner Permits 9 

Blasting Permits 18 

TOTAL PERMITS 517 

Boxes Tested 198 

Richard Goddard, a callman for many years, was appointed a 
permanent firefighter February 16. During the year he success- 
fully completed the 81 hour Emergency Medical Technician course at 
Emerson Hospital and the eight week basic training course at the 
Massachusetts Fire Academy in Stow. 

The Town's municipal fire alarm system was expanded with the 
addition of six new boxes to bring the total to 27 including eight 
street boxes and 19 master boxes. 

88 



During the winter and spring months, training drills were held 
under the direction of Captain Malcolm MacGregor of the Acton Fire 
Department and Captain Joseph Bozak of Lincoln. 

Regularly scheduled inspections were carried out at all public 
buildings, the Lincoln Rest Home, and all service and retail busi- 
nesses in Town. Fire drills and inspections were conducted at 
all schools. 

The new pumper voted on and approved at the Town Meeting was 
ordered and is scheduled for delivery in March of 1975. 

The Town was hit with three major fires during 1974. One 
fire leveled the remains of Hartwell Farm owned by the Minute Man 
National Park and another gutted a barn off Nelson Road also on 
Park property. The most severe loss was sustained in a fire that 
destroyed a classroom and laboratory facility, the property of 
East Coast Aero Tech at Hanscom Field. 

Demands upon the department for fire protection increased 
greatly this year with the opening of Farrar Pond Village for res- 
idency. Also, Lincoln became the primary source of fire protec- 
tion of all MassPort owned property at Hanscom Field. 

Captain Bozak and Firefighter Goddard continued their educa- 
tion in Fire Science at Massachusetts Bay Community College. 
Captain Bozak also completed a course in Fire Department Manage- 
ment and Organization at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. 

Donald Martini, a member of the call department for many 
years has taken a position with the Lexington Fire Department as 
a permanent firefighter. 

Recognition of services rendered to the Town by the callmen 
is greatly appreciated. 



89 



LINCOLN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Clifford Bradley 

Allen Bowles 

Joseph Bozak, permanent Captain 

Joseph Bozak, III 

Richard Carroll 

Richard Campobasso 

Edward Chisholm 

Thomas Coan, call Deputy 

Steve Coan 

Joseph Cotoni, Sr. 

Joseph Cotoni, Jr. 

Arthur Cotoni 

William Dean 

Kenneth Desmond 

Russell Dixon 

William Doherty, call Deputy 

Alan Donaldson 

George Faran 

Joseph Fratto 

Richard Goddard, permanent Firefighter 

Frank Gordon 

Ernest Johnson 

Joseph Lenox, Jr. 

Kevin Loughlin 

Roland Mackenzie 

David Malloy 

Robert Malloy 

Paul Moynihan 

Dennis Murphy 

Edward Murphy 

John Murray 

John 0' Loughlin 

George Thomas 

Richard Valliere 

Walter VanWart, permanent Firefighter 

Mark Warner 

William Whalen 

Willim Whalen, Jr. 



90 



CIVIL DEFENSE AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 
Alanson H. Sturgis, Jr., Director 



Activities of this agency during the year were almost wholly 
concerned with routine matters. Our communications links con- 
tinued to function well. Radio contact with higher Civil Defense 
echelons is satisfactory and we have received the test alerts via 
State Police radio and teletype. 

As 1974 progressed I found that I was spending an increasing 
amount of time planning for the Concord and Lexington Bicentennial 
celebrations as they affect Lincoln. They do, especially in the 
area of public safety. Consider that parking in Concord is lim- 
ited, and that when that limit is reached, no more automobiles 
will be allowed to enter the Town and it is difficult to come to 
any other conclusion but that Lincoln will have a traffic problem 
of considerable proportions. In order to help avoid, if possible, 
a real disaster over the weekend of April 19, 1975, I felt that it 
was appropriate to involve this agency in both planning and opera- 
tions. 

Emergency medical operations could be very difficult; I am 
doing what I can to help in the planning in this area. In this 
connection I am fortunate in that I have been representing the 
Town on the regional Emergency Medical Service Planning Committee. 
Thus I am keeping up with plans in the adjoining towns, and we can 
coordinate our efforts. Medical plans are not really very far 
along, as of the end of 1974, but we feel that we can cope. 

Traffic is going to be really serious, I feel , and an adequate 
number of police officers is vital. I have undertaken to re-es- 
tablish an Auxiliary Police Force under this agency, to work in 
conjunction with the regular officers as needed. Some volunteers 
have come forward; I sincerely hope a great many more will do so. 
With adequate manpower (and/or woman power) I think that we can 
minimize the impact on the Town -- without the help of its citizens, 
I'm afraid we may well face some traumatic days next April. 



91 



INSPECTORS OF BUILDINGS, WIRING AND PLUMBING 

Ernest L. Johnson, Building Inspector 

William M. Dean, Wiring Inspector 

Daniel J. Murphy, Plumbing and Gas Inspector 



The new State Uniform Building Code went into effect on Jan. 1, 
1975. It was enacted under authority of Chapter 802 of the Acts 
of 1972, as amended, and entitled "Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
State Building Code". In scope it regulates: (a) the construction, 
reconstruction, alteration, repair, demolition, removal, inspection, 
issuance and revocation of permits or licenses, installation of 
equipment, classification and definition of any building or struct- 
ure, and use or occupancy of all buildings and structures and parts 
thereof; (b) the rehabilitation and maintenance of existing build- 
ings; (c) the standards or requirements for materials to be used in 
connection therewith, including, but not limited to, provisions for 
safety, ingress and egress, energy conservation, and sanitary con- 
ditions; and (d) the establishment of reasonable fees for the issu- 
ance of licenses and permits in connection therewith; except as such 
matters are otherwise provided for in the Massachusetts General Laws 
Annotated, or in the rules and regulations authorized for promulga- 
tion under the provisions of the Basic Code. 

Every citizen in the Town should try to become as familiar as 
possible with the wide scope of the new Code. As examples: 
1) Section 111.43 states it is mandatory that the owner of a dwell- 
ing unit must notify the Building Department if the unit is to be 
vacated. It may not be reoccupied again unless the Building De- 
partment issues a new Certificate of Occupancy. This also applies 
to apartments that are vacated at least once every twelve-month 
period. 2) Section 1218.211 states: All new or hereafter- 
altered buildings which are less than thirty feet in height above 
mean grade shall contain automatic smoke detectors or automatic 
smoke and heat detectors connected to audible alarms. Permits 
to do detector and alarm work must be applied for at the Town Hall 
and no building may be occupied until the wiring inspector has certi- 
fied the system is approved and operating. 

Copies of the Code may be reviewed by visiting the Building 
Department office in the basement of the Town Hall. 

During the year Farrar Pond Village completed construction on 
all condominiums in the 1st cluster. Construction was well done 
and all twenty-seven units have been issued occupancy certificates. 

92 



It was only after many complicated delays that this department 
was finally able to issue 125 building permits to J. B. L. Con- 
struction Co., Inc., for the construction of low and moderate in- 
come housing. This project is located off Lincoln Road opposite the 
Community Store. It is a Lincoln Foundation, Inc. project, with 
the financing coming from the Massachusetts Housing § Finance Agency. 
Work is well underway and this department is keeping a constant check 
to be sure that all town interests are being protected. 



I. (1) Building Permits issued in 1974 





New Residential 


9 








New R-4 Housing Units (125) 


87 








Additions § Alterations 


34 








Foundations (for building 










relocation) 


1 








Stables & Barns 


6 








Sheds § Garages 


6 








Swimming Pools 


4 








Greenhouses 


2 








Buildings Demolished 


1 

150 permits 






(2) 


Contractors' estimated costs 










of construction 


$4 


,945,000, 


00 


(3) 


Fees collected 




6,216 


20 


(4) 


Inspections 


367 






(1) 


Wiring Permits issued in 1974: 


110 






(2) 


Contractors' estimated costs 




95,033 


00 


(3) 


Fees collected 




1,562 


00 



II. 



III.* (1) Plumbing $ Gas Fitting Permits 

issued in 1974 101 

(2) Contractors' estimated costs 132,903.00 

(3) Fees collected 810.00 

(4) Inspections 171 



Total Construction Costs $5,172,936.00 

Total fees collected $ 8,588.20 

Permit applications for R-4 Housing not applied for in 1974. 



93 



Health and Welfare 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Joan Comstock 

Herbert A. Haessler 

Gordon A. Donaldson, Chairman 



The Board held its first meeting following the Town election 
in March, and Mrs. Joan Comstock was elected Secretary. Annual 
appointments were made at that time, consisting of Mrs. Jeanne 
Jacobs, Agent, Mr. George Wells, Burial Agent, Dr. Alden Russell, 
Inspector of Slaughtering, and Mr. Lawrence Hallett, Inspector of 
Animals. In July, Mr. Hallett resigned, and we herewith thank him 
for his conscientious services over the years. Mrs. Margaret Marsh 
was chosen to fill out his term of office. The position of Town 
Dog Officer was awarded again to Mr. Vincent De Amicis. Several 
licenses were granted, and numerous inspections of restaurants, 
cider presses, sub-standard dwellings, and sewage installations 
were made during the course of the year. 

As the density of housing increases in town, and high land for 
building becomes exhausted, the Board finds itself working more 
closely with the Conservation Commission and the Planning Board. 
The Wetland and Watershed protection zoning, approved at the Decem- 
ber, 1973, Town Meeting defines Wetlands as land subjected to "peri- 
odic flooding". This is estimated to comprise approximately 20% 
of the area of the town. Although details relating to Wetlands 
and Watershed areas were spelled out in a previous report, a State 
regulation effective in January of this year is worthy of repetition: 
"No sewage disposal system shall be constructed or maintained within 
100 feet of any known source of water supply or tributary thereto. 
No sewage disposal system shall be constructed within 75 feet for a 
single dwelling, or 100 feet for a multiple dwelling, of any great 
pond, stream, brook, tidal water, river or swamp without prior ap- 
proval of the Department of Public Health". 

It is also worthy of repetition that, in the control of the 
sewage effluent, the Board adheres rigidly to its previously estab- 
lished ruling that in the design of any disposal system the flow 
capacity shall not be less than 100 gallons per person per day; and 
that, in any dwelling, a room designated as a bedroom shall assume 

94 



■::■ 



occupancy by two persons. These decisions were made after research 
of existing systems in Lincoln, as well as reports collected from 
neighboring towns. 

In July, Mrs. Jeanne Jacobs found it necessary to resign her 
position as Supervisor of the School Health Program. She proved 
to be a highly trained School Health Officer, with meticulous organ- 
izational ability. Her pamphlet on Practical Procedures for Emer- 
gency Care in Case of Sickness or Accident will continue to be used 
by students and teachers alike. We thank her for her concerned 
efforts. 

In August, 1974, a contract with the Emerson Hospital Home Care 
Nursing Service was signed. This Service is designed to provide 
not only school health care, but also the personnel necessary for 
the various nursing duties in Town. By placing all of the nursing 
services under this agency, Lincoln gained a comprehensive Community 
Health Program, with one nurse concerned with the health of the en- 
tire community, regardless of age or special needs. Lincoln is 
provided with the services of one Public Health nurse, whose base 
is in the Smith School (259-9407) on a regular basis. And should 
the need arise, other nurses from the Service may be called in for 
home care. As our Agent in the Schools, the nurse acts as a 
health resource person to students and teaching staff, provides 
first aid and emergency treatment, codifies immunization status for 
all children, reports communicable diseases, and directs various 
special clinics, such as those for vision and hearing screening, 
influenza vaccine administration, and skin testing of school per- 
sonnel for tuberculosis. 

Abroad in the town, the nurse provides home visits to all pre- 
maturely born infants and to individuals who have reported certain 
of the more serious communicable diseases. She supervises the 
Well Child Conference, administered by Dr. John Davies on the third 
Thursday of each month from 2:00 to 4:30 p.m. at the Smith School 
Health Unit. At this time, Dr. Davies also does routine school 
physical examinations, when requested by the parents, on students 
in Kindergarten, First, Fourth and Seventh grades. 

Nursing in the home is carried out under supervision of the in- 
dividual's physician, and on a part-time basis. This nursing 
assistance spares the sick and convalescent the additional ordeal 
and expense of hospitalization, keeps many elderly infirm people 
out of Nursing Homes, and allows more and more terminally ill 
patients to be cared for at home. There is a charge for these 
home health services, which are often defrayed by Medicare, Blue 



95 



Cross, most insurance carriers, and other sources. The Lincoln 
Pierce Fund is still of great assistance in this regard when the 
need arises. 507 nursing visits were paid to 58 patients, 9 physi- 
cal therapy visits to 5 patients, and 436 home health aid visits to 
10 patients. 

As in all suburban towns, the dog population of Lincoln has in- 
creased, bring with it problems relating to stray animals. The 
Board of Health has been assigned the job of animal control by the 
Board of Selectmen. Strays, impounded at the Town Barn, under 
the care of a Dog Officer, are disposed of if not claimed within 
five days by the owner. Increasing fines are levied for each re- 
currence, and after the third offense, the animal is destroyed. 
Stray dogs tend to run in packs, and provide a real hazard to school 
children and citizens. 

The School Health Program has greatly benefitted by the pres- 
ence of Mrs. Robert Whatley, as Health Aide. And the Board of 
Health continues deeply grateful to numerous volunteers who contri- 
bute generously of their time to the success of various Clinics. 

ti' 






96 



Planning and Public Works 



PLANNING BOARD 

Robert C. Brannen 

James D. Birkett 

David M. Donaldson 

Richard C. Reece 

Susan M. Brooks, Chairman 



On the thirtieth of November a joyful ceremony marked the 
occasion of the official ground-breaking for the subsidized housing, 
the culmination of many years of effort on the part of town com- 
mittees, the Rural Land Foundation, the League of Women Voters and 
the Lincoln Foundation. By the end of the year, the necessary 
trees had been removed and work had been begun on the roads. 

After many years of meeting once a week, the Planning Board 
gradually became aware during 1974 that the business recession was 
having its effect even on us. High interest rates and economic 
uncertainty put such a damper on development that our business 
could often be satisfactorily accomplished in bi-weekly meetings. 

Only one final subdivision plan was signed during the year, 
that for the Smith-Norton property on Route 2, belonging to the 
Rural Land Foundation. Work has begun on site development for 
seven house lots. These are intended primarily to accommodate 
families displaced by the National Park or Route 2. 

The plans for two other subdivisions are nearing completion. 
Mr. Everett Black is planning to divide his property off Page Road 
into seven lots. The land includes a part of the famous Flint 
esker which has, for many years, been, with the informal acquiesence 
of the land owners, an important walking and riding trail. The 
Planning Board and the Conservation Commission regret that arrange- 
ments could not be worked out which would give the public a legal 
right to continue this use. 

Mr. Howard Stevenson, the present owner of "Horizon Hill", 
formerly owned by Mrs. Shaw, off Tower Road, is dividing this prop- 
erty of about 23 acres into four house lots, one of which is for 
the existing house on the hilltop. Five acres of the total have 



97 



been given to the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust, as well as a 
trail easement from Tower Road to reach the conservation land. 

A plan for nine lots off Trapelo Road, belonging to the DeNor- 
mandie and Oliver Cope families, will not require Planning Board 
approval, when finally submitted, as each lot has legal frontage 
on either Lexington Road or Mine Brook Road. 

Despite the economic slowdown, there are several contemplated 
subdivisions which we should tell you about: on Tower Road, just 
south of the railroad tracks, forty acres of Connolly property; on 
Lincoln Road, near Long Meadow Road, thirteen acres belonging to 
Mrs. Gray; on South Great Road, west of Route 126, fifteen acres of 
the Pickmans; on Page Road, forty-six acres belonging to Mr. and 
Mrs. Humez; on Old County Road, on the Waltham line, forty- three 
acres of the Old County Trust; and between Mackintosh Lane and Baker 
Bridge Road, forty acres of Henry Warner. None of these plans is 
yet in final form and it may be many years before development occurs 
The Board is happy to report that several of these tentative plans 
include land to be set aside for conservation. 

About 4.5 acres remain in the R-2 zone behind Ridge Court, and 
the owners, Messrs. Russes and Williamson, are developing plans for 
seventeen apartment units there. This is the only undeveloped land 
in Town zoned R-2. Any zoning for future apartments will be re- 
classified as R-3, or some modification of it, in order to provide 
a larger allotment of open space for each unit. 

The zoning status of Lewis Street, B-2, has never been proper- 
ly understood by anyone, including the Planning Board, and though 
several useful enterprises flourish there, most of them appeared to 
be somewhat illegal. Accordingly, the Board requested a study by 
a Task Force comprised of Messrs. Alan McClennen, Crawley Cooper, 
and D'Arcy MacMahon, to determine what changes in the by-law might 
result in a more comprehensible, as well as a more useful, zoning 
district. Their recommendations called for special licensing of 
the activities already engaged in, and the added provision for 
apartments. The amendment was duly voted at Town Meeting. The 
Board continues' to favor activities on that side of Lincoln Road 
which have a low potential for generating traffic, in the hope that 
enterprises which do generate significant traffic will eventually 
locate across the road in the new commercial area. Designs are 
still incomplete, however, for this part of the South Lincoln plan. 
The Rural Land Foundation, owner of the property, is understandably 
eager to have construction begin, but recognizes the necessity for 
a development that Lincoln can be happy with. 



98 



The Board accepted the resignation from the Bicycle Path Com- 
mittee of Chairman Mrs. John Brown, with deep appreciation for her 
conscientious and successful labors. Mrs. William DeFord, Mrs. 
C. Gordon Bell and Mr. John Snelling have accepted appointment to 
the Committee, and Mrs. Alan Smith will be chairman. During the 
year the path along Codman Road was completed from the corner of 
Lincoln Road to its junction with South Great Road, and thence along 
South Great Road to .Tower Road. This will allow safe travel for 
pedestrians and cyclists, not only along those roads, but also from 
Stonehedge and the east end of Old Sudbury Road as well. Work 
will begin next spring on a section of path on Lincoln Road, from 
Postcard Lane to South Great Road. 

The Board made recommendations to the Board of Appeals, as re- 
quired in the bylaw, regarding four applications for apartment per- 
mits. All of these applications were subsequently granted by the 
Appeals Board. 

A map of the Town showing all existing trails for walking and 
riding, and indicating where easements and permission for such 
trails are needed and should be secured, is being developed by the 
Conservation Commission. This will be of the greatest assistance 
to the Planning Board and to landowners who are planning to sub- 
divide. While we are not always successful in preserving such 
easements in all subdivisions, we hope that a way will be found to 
ensure that the privilege we now have of walking freely through the 
woods and fields, often on private property, may somehow be pre- 
served for a future time when what we have now will be even more 
scarce and therefore more previous. 



99 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Barbara Barker 

Robert Jevon 

Peter Meenan 

Hans van Leer 

Elliott V. Grabill, Chairman 

Alice Pickman, Associate Member 
David Sykes, Associate Member 



This Board during 1974 scheduled thirteen hearings and, in 
addition, met eight more times to work out the complicated require- 
ments for a decision involving the Lincoln Foundation and Lincoln 
Homes Corporation. 

The responsibility for any hearing and any individual is great. 
The Lincoln Foundation matter involved major responsibilities. It 
was the culmination of years of effort by many dedicated individuals 
and Town boards. The technical requirements were arduous, and this 
Board has endeavored to provide all the tools so that the Board of 
Selectmen in its administrative and enforcement functions can carry 
on. 

Many of the applications concern desires of individuals to pro- 
vide an additional apartment on their property in accordance with 
the definition of the Planning Board and the Town of Lincoln which 
happily became law in June of 1972. 

A continuing two year disappointment for this Board is that 
honest and rational differences of opinion between this Board and 
our appointing Board, the Board of Selectmen, have mistakenly been 
thought of as a feud of strong and unyielding legal minds, locked 
in unending struggle. 

Nothing could be further from the truth. Surely it is under- 
stood that the appeal by the Selectmen to the Middlesex Court in 
the Hall case is an attempt to work out in legal fashion honest dif- 
ferences of opinion between reasonable persons. Thus, the resolu- 
tion of whatever needs to be resolved is left to a third party, a 
judge in Middlesex County. 

At this state, this Board is uncertain that anything is now 
unresolved. After the decision in 1973, followed by the bringing 



100 



of suit by the Selectmen, the Planning Board, with great effort and 
ingenuity, working with the Hall's counsel, found a satisfactory 
solution, signed and approved a plan, received confirming approval 
from the Land Court, and the entire transaction was closed. 

To us, the case appears moot and now without meaning. How- 
ever, since the legal action continues to dangle, we are certain 
that there is understanding that it is time to seek the help of 
that third party first approached to decide on whatever resolutions 
he will under the circumstances. It is untidy to leave the mat- 
ter dangling. Accordingly, we are moving for summary judgment 
which we feel will resolve the issue. If not resolved by way of 
summary judgment, we shall move to advance the matter for trial. 



101 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

John Quincy Adams 

Florence L. Caras 

Lydia H. Dane 

James DeNormandie 

Ronald H. Marcks 

William M. Preston 

Robert A. Lemire, Chairman 



This marks the first full year of having a field staff to 
manage and maintain the Town's conservation lands. We are proud 
of the work done by Russell Barnes and his assistant, Amos Brown. 
It is one thing to acquire land; it is quite another to properly 
take care of it. Russell's major achievements include: the care- 
ful selection of trees and cutting of logs for the restoration of 
the Codman barns; the clearing of the Codman apple orchard; the 
planting of apple trees and the establishment of a Christmas tree 
nursery; clearing of the Tower Road well site; the clearing of 
hedgerows and dressing of stone walls; the transplanting of five 
20 to 30 foot maple trees from a grove on the Baker Bridge fields 
to the new Codman swimming pool; the repair of trail bridges and 
establishment of erosion controls on well-worn trails; elm sani- 
tation; the cutting, splitting, storage and delivery of firewood; 
and the establishment of a parcel by parcel soils monitoring sys- 
tem. It only takes a walk in our woods to appreciate the fine 
work that Russell and his crew are doing. Their efforts, of 
course, are only possible because of the excellent cooperation of 
Dick Carroll's Department of Public Works and the overall super- 
vision of Warren Flint. 

It is so easy to take our beautiful agricultural fields for 
granted. We want to draw attention to this important Town re- 
source and express our gratitude to our leasing farmers who do 
such a wonderful job of tending our fields. If the Town still 
looks and feels a' little as it must have in 1775, it is in good 
measure due to the maintenance of its agricultural potential. 

In our management program, we are moving toward establishment 
of a shade tree nursery, sugar bush development, more Christmas 
trees, and wildlife protection. Our support of Codman Community 
Farms is closely related to our management efforts. In 1974, we 
sponsored a successful pilot farming program on the Codman far 
meadow. Although the Commission still has close to $1,600 tied 
up in equipment and other aspects of this project, we are happy to 

102 



report that it demonstrated the viability of undertaking a commun- 
ity farming effort provided there is strong volunteer support. We 
welcome Codman Community Farms to the Lincoln land use scene and 
are sure that its role will continue to grow in importance to all 
Town citizens. 

As we continue to pursue our land acquisition program, we are 
now concentrating on establishing a comprehensive trail system that 
will assure maintenance of orderly control. We are working close- 
ly with the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust and the Lincoln Plan- 
ning Board to expand the existing system of trails in a way that 
will protect private interests. We plan to devote considerable 
attention to this program in the near future. 

We are pleased to report that we have received assurances of 
$69,750.00 from State Self-Help funds towards the Militzer and 
Smith/Norton total acquisition costs of $140,000.00. In addi- 
tion, we have received cash and assurances totalling $18,000 
toward the Militzer acquisition from the Lincoln families of Fran- 
cis S. Andrews, John F. Paino and Louis T. Skinner, and the Edwin 
Brooks family of Concord. In addition, the three Lincoln families 
have granted conservation easements over some five acres of abut- 
ting land assuring preservation of the open aspect of this import- 
ant gateway to Lincoln. We are deeply grateful for this superb 
generosity and cooperation. 

We have also been busy in our wetlands management program, de- 
voting considerable time in particular to the Lincoln Foundation's 
moderate income housing project. 

We are much involved in the Routes 2 and 126 relocation studies 
which are expected to have significant impact on our overall con- 
servation program. 

In the course of our work, we have come to miss our agency bud- 
get, which gave us the flexibility to undertake self-supporting 
conservation projects, and will seek its restoration. In consider- 
ing our budget, note should be taken that our projects have con- 
tributed the following sums to the Town's free cash account: farm 
leases - $2,185; lumber and firewood sales - $1,835; and contract 
work for the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust - $600.00. The day 
will come when our apple trees will bear fruit, our Christmas trees 
cheer your homes, and our shade trees live on your streets. As 
we expand our activities, we will need more of your continued sup- 
port. 



103 



In closing, we want to express our special thanks to all at the 
Town Hall and Town Barn who made our work possible. In particular, 
we want to thank Roberta Page and Elizabeth Snelling, Warren Flint, 
Russell Barnes and Bob Gargill. 



LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

Trustees 

Roger Barzun 

Bradford Cannon 

Jeanne C. Healey 

William A. King 

Ruth Wales 

John Loud, Treasurer 

William M. Preston, Chairman 



During the past year, the Trust received the generous gift of 
five acres of forested land from Mr. and Mrs. Howard H. Stevenson. 
The lot, partially encircling the base of Shaw Hill, will be 
reached by a trail from Tower Road. This conveyance was made as 
a gift by Mr. and Mrs. Stevenson in memory of the lifelong interest 
and concern for nature and conservation that was shown by Mrs. 
Alice deV. Shaw as a resident of the Town of Lincoln for more than 
thirty-five years. 

A nature trail has been laid out around the Silver Hill Bog 
and a trail guide for it is in preparation. Considerable clearing 
has been carried out at our Twin Pond property, and on the new 
Baker lot off Winter Street a fine stand of rejd cedars has been res- 
cued from overtopping oaks and maples. The general policy of the 
Trust is to keep all open spaces open, or to enlarge them; Lincoln 
tends to become increasingly forested and shut in. 

The Annual Meeting of the Land Trust and its affiliated organi- 
zation, the Rural Land Foundation, was held on May 7th, 1974. For 
the Land Trust, Roger Barzun was elected Trustee, and John F. Loud 
and William M. Preston were re-elected. George Wells and Charles 
P. Kindleberger were re-elected to the Board of the Rural Land Foun- 
dation. Mr. Bradford C. Northrup, Eastern Regional Director of 
the Nature Conservancy, addressed the meeting on the subject: "Land 
Conservation Through Private Action." 

104 



LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 



Treasurer's Report 



On hand January 1, 1974: 

Savings account balance 
Checking account balance 



$9,131.75 
922.72 









$10,054.47 


Receipts: 








Contributions 


3 


,446.43 




Gifts toward specific land 








purchase 




600.00 




Sales of trail maps, guides, and 








"Beaver Pond Ecology" 




506.40 




Interest on savings account 




474.82 


5,027.65 
$15,082.12 


Expenditures: 








Trail upkeep, labor $ materials 


$ 


750.13 




Insurance: Liability 




97.00 


^s 


Workmen's Compensation 




110.00 




Social Security taxes 




36.18 




Printing, stationery, postage 




373.04 




Filing fee 




3.00 




Duplicating 




35.51 


1,404.86 


On hand, December 31, 1974: 








Savings account balance 


12 


,606.57 




Checking account balance 


1 


,070.69 





$13,677.26 



105 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Richard P. Carroll, Superintendent 

ROAD MAINTENANCE 

The Public Works force applied Type I bituminous concrete to 
500 feet of Old Lexington Road. Remaining work is scheduled to 
be accomplished in the spring. 

GENERAL MAINTENANCE 

General maintenance on the Town streets, such as sweeping, 
patching, brush control and guardrail repair, was accomplished as 
required. The Department responded to 676 work orders of various 
nature. Assistance was provided for the swimming pool construc- 
tion, specifically in the installation of culvert and head walls, 
construction of driveway and paths to and around the pool, in- 
stallation of watermain and service, grading and loaming of grounds, 
and supplying equipment for site work. Also under this section, 
the Town forces installed 850 feet of drainage pipe, 5 catchbasins 
and 5 manholes for drainage on Bedford Road. This work was done 
in conjunction with Chapter 90 work being accomplished. 

PARKS 

The custom mowing for the schools and playgrounds was contin- 
ued as in the past. All preparations were accomplished for the 
activities in Town for the April 19 and July 4 celebrations. All 
ballfields were prepared for the school and leagues. 

The annual spray programs for Dutch Elm, poison ivy and tent 
caterpillars were accomplished as in past years. Fertilizers 
were applied where needed. 

EQUIPMENT 

All Public Works and Public Safety equipment was maintained 
and repaired as needed. 

SNOW AND ICE 

All streets, parking areas and Town properties were maintained 
as efficiently as possible. 

106 



SANITARY LAND FILL 

The sanitary land fill was maintained by a private contractor 
obtained by competitive bids. 

TRAPELQ ROAD BICYCLE PATH 

The remaining work on the bicycle path was completed. 

ROUTE 117 CODMAN ROAD BICYCLE PATH 

5500 feet of bicycle path has been prepared and surfaced. Com- 
pletion of the loaming and grading will be accomplished in the 
spring. 

CHAPTER 90 MAINTENANCE 

Under Chapter 90 Maintenance the resurfacing was completed on 
South Great Road, from the railroad tracks to the Weston Town Line, 
Concord Road from the Concord Town Line to Baker Bridge Road, and 
Old Bedford Road from Airport Road to Virginia Road. 

CHAPTER 90 CONSTRUCTION 

The Town forces started construction on Bedford Road with the 
installation of drainage in the road. 1800 feet of drainage pipe, 
13 manholes and 20 catchbasins were installed. 



I would like to thank all those involved with the operation 
of the Public Works Department, and I hope we will be able to 
provide satisfactory service as needed in the future. 



107 



MINUTE MAN REGIONAL REFUSE PLANNING BOARD 

Lincoln Representatives: 

Ruth Ann Hendrickson 
Henry Harrison 
Fred P. Silverstein 

The life of the Lincoln landfill is coming to an end -- proba- 
bly in the fall of this year. The Town is in immediate need of 
disposal alternatives. To this end, the Refuse Disposal Planning 
Committee has been working with the Minute Man Regional Refuse 
Disposal Planning Board, consisting of eight member towns: Bedford, 
Boxborough, Burlington, Carlisle, Concord, Lincoln, Stow and Sud- 
bury. At last year's Town Meeting, Lincoln voted its share of 
funding for a $32,500 professional study of the region's solid 
waste problems and disposal options. After a long process of 
interviews and proposal evaluations, the Cambridge firm of Arthur 
D. Little, Inc. was selected. Part of the study, which began in 
September of 1974, was to review each town's current, disposal 
practices and recommend interim and long term methods of solid 
waste management. 

The study has revealed that a regional solution is three to 
ten years off, depending on the type of disposal process chosen. 
Clearly Lincoln needs an interim solution. Arthur D. Little iden- 
tified three options: joint refuse disposal with Concord in Con- 
cord's current landfill; establishment of a transfer station where 
refuse would be collected in a large container and then transported 
out of town to a privately owned landfill in Tyngsboro; or purchase 
of a small modular incinerator. The third option was considered 
comparatively expensive for a town the size of Lincoln. The 
transfer station approach is appealing as it would continue in use 
when a regional plan is implemented, the refuse going to the re- 
gional disposal facility rather than a private landfill. The 
first option is also attractive and is currently being pursued 
with the Town of Concord to see if an arrangement with mutual ben- 
efit can be worked out. 

On the regional level the three alternatives of regional land- 
fill, modular incineration with steam recovery and sale, and full 
resource recovery were agreed upon by the Board and ADL to be the 
best possible solutions after a data-based profile of the region 
was drawn at the beginning of the study. Idenfif ication of sites 
specific to the requirements of each of these three options has 

108 



been of the highest priority, as we anticipated it to be the most 
difficult and delicate political obstacle facing the Board. 

Attacking the problem of siting for a regional landfill, the 
civil engineering section of ADL studied the existing landfills of 
member towns both to determine whether any are appropriate for 
regional use and to provide each town with an independent opinion 
of the life of its landfill and projected operating costs. Addi- 
tionally, geological and hydrological maps, surveys of open space 
unavailable for our purposes and the Board's own experienced Site 
Committee were consulted for identification of suitable sites not 
already being landfilled. When ADL met with the officials of each 
town during a later phase of the study and solicited suggestions of 
landfill sites perhaps overlooked, the last stone was turned over 
in this regard. It is the Board's and ADL's firm opinion that 
there are no good sites for landfilling on the regional level and 
though the existing landfills of Concord, Sudbury and Stow have 
significant life left for town use, none would have over three years 
of life as a regional site. With the further consideration that 
the cost per disposed ton in a regional landfill would be relatively 
high at around $10, it was decided to eliminate landfilling as a 
regional solution and to concentrate on the other two alternatives, 
as they have revenue-producing potential to offset costs. 

The possibility of modular incineration as a cost competitive 
disposal option is predicated on the identification of a year-round, 
long-run customer for recovered steam. The siting of this kind of 
regional facility would depend on the location of the customer 
within the region. For instance , the U. S. Air Force at Hanscom 
Field has expressed some interest in buying steam from the Minute 
Man region to supplement its own boiler's capacity and requires 
year-round generation for heating and air conditioning. A customer 
would derive the additional benefit of on-site disposal of its own 
solid waste. 

There are several attractive characteristics of the modular 
incineration option. The nine member towns, with a total popula- 
tion of some 105,000, producing 266 tons a day of solid waste, 
constitutes a region large enough to operate a steam recovery facil- 
ity. This means that no time would be lost to an effort to con- 
vince other cities or towns to add their waste tonnages to our own. 
The Minute Man Region could have a facility in the range of 150 to 
300 tons a day on line in the relatively short period of 1 to 2 
years, which is an important consideration, as several of the 
member towns, Lincoln included, are in need of a replacement for 
their landfills in the near future. In addition, modular inciner- 

109 



ation is a tried and true disposal method. There are many such 
facilities in operation throughout the United States, so there is 
no technological risk, and a full range of data on capital and 
operating costs is available. The controlled air modular incin- 
erators being considered by the Board represent no environmental 
hazards. The particulate content of the minimal smoke they emit 
measures at levels significantly below the maximum standards estab- 
lished by the tough Massachusetts Clean Air Law. Unlike large 
municipal incinerators, they require, and therefore dispose of, 
miniscule amounts of cleaning water. The only problem with regard 
to wastes generated by these incinerators is the 10% residue, which 
is a mix of ash, glass and metal. This residue could be landfilled 
with greater source separation at the transfer station level reduc- 
ing its size, or in the future it could be trucked to a secondary 
resource recovery facility, such as that which Raytheon is develop- 
ing in Lowell, for further treatment. 

The final regional waste disposal alternative being considered 
by the Minute Man Board and ADL, Inc., full resource recovery, is 
a more ambitious and complicated matter. Our study conceives of 
a privately operated facility fed by 1,000 to 2,000 tons of solid 
waste a day. It would convert the paper and light plastic fraction 
(about 60% of total waste) into a low BTU content fuel and segregate 
glass (6-10%), ferrous metals (5%) and non-ferrous metals (1-2%) for 
sale back to manufacturers or to secondary materials dealers. The 
light fraction fuel would be sold to industries in the area to fire 
their existing boilers, with some modifications needed. 

To date no such full resource recovery facility has been built, 
though the Connecticut Resources Recovery Authority is presently 
contracting for two 2,000 ton a day facilities and in Massachusetts 
several towns in the Merrimac Valley, with the assistance of the 
Bureau of Solid Waste of the State DPW, are in the planning stages 
for a plant in Haverill. Information on capital costs gained from 
these and other related projects allow a reasonable accuracy in 
estimating capital investments of $16.8 million and $24 million for 
operations of 1,000 and 2,000 tons per day respectively. While 
this range of capital investment is considerably greater than the 
$1.5-2.5 million required for modular incineration, full resource 
recovery offers the better possibility for low per ton disposal 
costs. Although at present uncertainty about the demand for re- 
covered fuel and materials and the resulting difficulty of estimat- 
ing revenues derived from sales of recoverables prevent a clear 
focus, even the most pessimistic estimates of revenues and operating 
costs describe a satifactory bottom line for per ton costs. As 
prices for fossil fuels and raw materials continue at the levels of 
the past few years or rise even further,, the market for alternative 

no 



fuel forms and secondary materials should stabilize and strengthen. 
Indeed, when and if confidence in recovered fuel and materials is 
established, resource recovery would have the potential for revenue 
from sales exceeding operating costs. 

The total daily tonnage of the Minute Man Board's member towns 
is only one quarter of that needed for the smallest economically 
feasible full resource recovery facility of 1,000 tons per day 
capacity. This obviously means that other cities and towns in 
eastern Massachusetts with solid waste problems would have to be 
recruited into the Region to bring its tonnage to a level from 
which it would be reasonable to proceed with planning and contract- 
ing activities. The finding of a site within the present Region 
would significantly increase our ability to attract other commun- 
ities to this solution. During this study a site has been identi- 
fied, and investigation into its availability is proceeding. 

If the Board's member towns decide to pursue this alternative, 
this state's DPW can by law be of tremendous value. With the 
commitment of the Board's member towns to only the principle of 
resource recovery, but without legal obligation until contracts are 
signed with the private operator of the facility, the State will 
assist with and fund the planning and contracting phases and will 
acquire the site and monitor the operator's performance. In addi- 
tion, legislation has been filed enabling the State to provide 
assistance to communities with bond issues to cover capital invest- 
ment. However, even with this extensive State participation, it 
could be four to ten years before the Region has a facility in oper- 
ation. 

The Minute Man Board expects to pursue these two regional 
alternatives vigorously over the next year. A decision will be 
made as to which solution is most promising and action taken to 
encourage implementation of the chosen plan. 

The Lincoln Committee would like to thank Peggy Stathos, who 
resigned this past fall, for the long hard hours she dedicated to 
the Minute Man Board as Publicity Chairman. Fred Silverstein 
of Morningside Lane was appointed to the three man committee in 
her stead and has already proved a valuable asset to the Committee 
and to the Minute Man Board. Lincoln is well represented on the 
Board with Ruth Ann Hendrickson and Henry Harrison recently elected 
to the positions of Vice-chairman and Secretary, respectively. 



Ill 



LINCOLN RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

Ruth Ann Hendrickson 
Joan Neely 



Last year our report optimistically projected thousands of dol- 
lars of profits to the town from the recycling program, largely due 
to the record breaking price for salvage paper. Shortly after Town 
Meeting, however, the price began to drop from $20/ton until by the 
end of the year we were lucky to have some one taking it away at 
all. Consequently our profit margin is very slim. Paper now 
brings us nothing. Glass about breaks even, due to the high over- 
head costs in renting the dumpster containers. Cans, which had 
been a large money drain, are now breaking even, or producing a 
slight profit due to a new region-wide system initiated by Lincoln's 
Committee. 

The sudden collapse of the salvage paper market caught even the 
salvage dealers by complete surprise. The demand for salvage 
paper has dropped because the demand for paper products has dropped, 
especially in the form of packaging, where a great deal of recycled 
fibre is used. The paper mills have reduced their work week from 
six days to three days. It is felt that this is a reflection of 
the economic recession which has reduced the sales volume of goods 
that require packaging. Also, the downturn in housing production 
means that some wood normally processed into construction lumber 
has been diverted to the pulp mill, further reducing the mill's de- 
mand for recycled fibre. 

Spokesmen for the paper salvage industry and the paper pro- 
duction industry expect that the market for salvage paper will rise 
again in late spring or early summer as manufacturers' overstock of 
packaging materials becomes depleted. At that point the recycling 
program will again bring profit to the town. 

In the meantime, keep recycling. The cans and glass are break- 
ing even or bringing small profit. The paper, though bringing no 
money at the moment, is not costing anything. There is a van at 
the landfill for salvage paper. The program does reduce the amount 
of material filling up the landfill. 



112 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Stuart B. Avery 
Thomas Norton, Clerk 
Alan McClennen, Chairman 



1974 was not a happy year for the Commissioners. In the 
spring we found out that the screen had fallen off one of the ser- 
vice mains in the pressure reservoir off Bedford Road, which had 
allowed fish and frogs to move out into the mains and into house- 
hold services and meters. Modifications were made in the system 
to ensure that this situation is unlikely to happen again. Even 
after the repair work was done, the fish taste continued in vary- 
ing amounts scattered, and then generally, throughout the town. 
In due course, with the help of the State Health Department chemists, 
it was concluded that on top of our actual fish problems, we had 
had a very active algae year. An aggressive flushing program was 
carried out at the year's end, along with heavy chlorination of the 
system, under the guidance of the State Health employees and the 
Town's engineering consultants. This led to the removal of sub- 
stantially all debris from the system and its replacement with fresh 
water. With the New Year, we shifted to the well to avoid any fur- 
ther intrusions, and kept a high chlorine count to minimize any re- 
growth possibilities. In this regard, we want to thank the State 
Department of Public Health for their testing and recommendations. 

Most efforts in 1974 were directed toward maintenance rather 
than significant improvements > 

At the Sandy Pond Pumping Station a modern septic tank and 
drainage system was installed. Also our oil tank capacity was 
doubled to generate savings in fuel costs due to less frequent de- 
liveries. 

At the pressure reservoir the old eight- inch main was aban- 
doned for general use but saved as a drain. In connection with 
the Bedford Road drainage system, provision was made to allow ulti- 
mate link-up between it and the eight-inch main to provide more 
efficient reservoir draining in case the need for cleaning arose 
again. Modifications were made to the mains at the Reservoir 
driveway to improve water flow to North Lincoln. While the 
Reservoir was drained in April, the bottom was again cleaned with 
the assistance of Public Works and Fire Department employees. Later 
the inflow-outflow screen was extended along with adjustments to the 
pressure control system to increase its operating efficiency. The 

113 



Commissioners held off action on the chlorinating system at the 
Reservoir pending improvement of our borrowing capabilities. Re- 
views of recent costs of tanks and covers for the Reservoir suggest 
chlorination is the best method to be used to comply with State re- 
quirements. 

At the Tower Road well site a fence was erected to prevent 
promiscuous dumping. The site was substantially regraded to elim- 
inate ponding above the well. A garage was obtained at no cost 
from the National Park for reconstruction as a storage shed. 

With the cooperation of the Public Works Department, numerous 
pavement cuts for services were repaired. Also numerous services 
on Bedford Road were modernized during the drainage construction 
work. 

Rates were adjusted to meet the rising costs of materials, 
manpower and operations. Most significant element was the elimin- 
ation of the so-called third step, a lower rate tending to encourage 
the use of water. Particular care was taken to avoid increasing 
the burden on small users, often elderly persons with fixed income. 

WATER RATES EFFECTIVE ON FALL BILLING OF 1974 





Semi- 


-Annual Rate Schedule 










Quantity in 


1000's 


Rate 


per 1000 gals 




Minimum 


of gallons allowed 


for 


excess over 


Meter Size 


Charge 
$13.00 


for minimum 
8 


charge 




minimum 


5/8" 




$0.48 


3/4" 


16.00 


13 






0.48 


1" 


21.00 


22 






0.48 


1 1/2" 


36.00 


43 






0.48 


2" 


51.00 


68 






0.48 


3" 


91.00 


130 






0.48 



Maintenance of the system continued with hydrant repair and 
replacement, gate location, flushing and similar activities, too 
numerous to list. 

Capital improvements were negligible. Departmental personnel 
worked with the Swimming Pool Committee in the extension of the 
school water mains to the pool, in the process relocating a hydrant 
at the request of the Fire Department. This 250-foot extension, 
with its blow-off at the end, brings the main within 800 feet of 
Sandy Pond Road, a link the Commissioners would like to make when 
financially feasible. 

114 



On the private side, the department supervised the installation 
of 780 feet of six-inch main and related services at the Smith-Norton 
development. Also advice was given for the installation of 200 feet 
of two- inch main on Juniper Ridge Road. Numerous conferences were 
held with Lincoln Homes relative to the least costly but adequate 
services for them. The Commissioners also adopted a reduced con- 
nection charge and water use charge, 80% of normal, to assist the 
project. As Farrar Pond Village became occupied, new income from 
these new customers began to develop. 

The Board has appreciated the efforts of Patrick Allen, fore- 
man, and Anthony Campobasso, Light Equipment Operator, in running 
the system on a day to day basis. Calls can be made to the Depart- 
ment at 259-8997 between 7 a.m. and 7:30 a.m., or by contacting the 
dispatcher at 259-8113. 

STATISTICS FOR 1974 

Gallons pumped during the year: 

Sandy Pond 125,220,870* 

Tower Road well 13,627,200 

Total 137,848,070 

* This figure is approximately correct but cannot be 
guaranteed because of a malfunction in the flow meter 
during a portion of 1974. 





Beginning of Year 


Added 


End 


of Year 


Miles of main 


39.27 


.2 




39.47 


Hydrants in use 


332 


1 




333 


Gates in use 


415 


4 




419 


Blow offs 


30 


2 




32 


Services in use 


1279 


18 




1295 


Meters in use 


1275 


18 




1293 


Replaced hydrants 








8 


Repaired hydrants 








27 


Repaired meters 








45 


Located and raised 










gate boxes 








18 


Service calls 








380 


Pressure maintained 




40- 


-100 P 


.S.I. 



115 






CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 

Donna Burt 
Glenn Merry 
Jens Touborg 
Eleanor Wilfert 
Julie Pugh, Chairman 



The role of the Celebration Committee has been that of coordin- 
ating and supporting the efforts and participation of Lincoln's org- 
anizations and committees in three public holidays. During the 
past year, the committee has worked closely with the Bicentennial 
Commission in planning for celebrations in 1975 and 1976. It ap- 
pears that most of the Town's celebrations and observances during 
the next two years will be coordinated by the Bicentennial Commission 

Patriots' Day observances are traditionally organized by Lin- 
coln's Company of Minute Men. The events, spread over a period of 
two weeks, brought increased attendance. Paul Revere 's Capture, 
the sounding of the alarm, the march of the Minute Men to Concord, 
involved Lincoln's townspeople. The Cemetery Ceremony was especi- 
ally impressive, enhanced by the presence of members of the Tenth 
Regiment of Foot, who shared in the honoring of the Patriots' and 
British graves. A picnic and family bicycle tour/race, organized 
by the Recreation Committee, were enjoyed by citizens of all ages. 

On Memorial Day the Selectmen honored the graves at all three 
cemeteries, planting another of Sumner Smith's young black walnut 
trees at the Lexington Road Cemetery. The American Legion honored 
the War Memorial at the Library. Dr. E. Donlan Rooney again served 
as master of ceremonies, and Tracey Keay played taps. The Brownies., 
Girl Scouts, American Legion and Fire Department color guards were 
joined by the citizens of the town in the procession. 

The events of Independence Day 1974 included both children's 
and main parade, the dedication of the Codman Memorial Pool, swim- 
ming competition, lacrosse and Softball exhibition games, a tennis 
tournament and children's games. An evening concert by the Waverly 
Post Band and a spectacular fireworks display brought record crowds 
and accompanying traffic control problems. Food sales during the 
day and evening provided revenue for many of the Town's organiza- 
tions. Concerned over the crowds, the Celebration Committee with 
the Selectmen designed a fireworks questionnaire, which was mailed 
to Lincoln's residents. Fifty-four per cent of those who replied 
favored discontinuation of the fireworks. After consideration of 



116 



alternative sites and plans, the Selectmen recommended that the fire- 
works be discontinued during the Bicentennial. 

The Committee enjoyed working with and assisting the other Lin- 
coln organizations. It is especially grateful to Mrs. Korell for 
publicity and coverage of the Town's celebrations. 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

H. Arnold MacLean 

Vincent N. Merrill 

James DeNormandie, Chairman 



The cemeteries have been maintained in good order during the 
past year. We have had one of the gates to the Lexington Road 
Cemetery damaged by vandals but, in general, feel that we have been 
fortunate in this regard, as it has proven difficult to close the 
cemetery on a regular basis each night. 

The Commissioners made available an attractive lot for a memo- 
rial to the members of the Fire and Police Department, who have 
loyally served the Town in past years. The large boulder for this 
memorial was dedicated on June 2, 1974. 

There were sixteen interments in 1974 and fourteen lots were 
sold. 



117 



MINUTE MAN NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK ADVISORY COMMISSION 

Katharine S. White, Lincoln Representative 
David L. Moffitt, Park Superintendent 



Legislation authorizing the establishment of Minute Man National 
Historical Park was passed in the first session of the 86th Congress 
on September 21, 1959 (Public Law 86-321). Public Law 86-321 
limited the size of the Park to 750 acres in the towns of Lincoln, 
Lexington and Concord. It also placed a limitation of $5,000,000 
for land acquisition and $3,000,000 for development. In 1970, 
Public Law 91-458 increased the amount for land acquisition by an 
additional $5,900,000. 

As of December 31, 1974, a total of approximately 600 acres has 
been acquired for the Park. Of the 600 acres, 298 are in Lincoln. 
61 acres remain to be acquired in Lincoln (40 acres in public owner- 
ship, 21 in private ownership). 

Total visitation for 1974 was 813,866, showing an increase of 
28% over that for 1973. This figure includes visitors to all the 
facilities in the area (Concord, Lincoln and Lexington). This is 
a dramatic increase over previous years. Last year there was an 
increase of eleven per cent, with previous years one to two percent. 

Early in the year the National Park Service was reorganized, 
resulting in the elimination of the Boston Group. The North Atlan- 
tic Region was created, serving the states of Maine, New Hampshire, 
Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York and New 
Jersey. Mr. Jerry D. Wagers, whose office is located at 150 
Causeway Street, Boston, Massachusetts, is Director. Consequent- 
ly, the Superintendent and his staff moved from North Great Road in 
Lincoln to their present quarters in the former Buttrick Mansion, 
off Liberty Street in Concord. 

The number of permanent personnel employed by the Park is 22. 

There has been a dramatic increase of vandalism and other dam- 
aging activities in the Park over the last months of the year, 
particularly in the Fiske Hill area. As a result, the Park has 
formulated an agreement with the U. S. Magistrate at Fort Devens; 
now Park rangers will have authority to issue citations for offen- 
ses, littering, vandalism, etc. As in the past, the Park will 
continue to rely on Lincoln, Lexington and Concord police, who have 
always been most cooperative, for serious crime, but from the stand- 



118 






point of malicious vandalism and littering, the Park can now take 
a more active role. 

On December 1, 1973, Hartwell Farm was destroyed by fire, prob- 
ably set by vandals. This is a tremendous loss to the Park and 
the area. Park personnel have cleaned up the debris and closed 
off the area. They hope, in the near future, to stabilize the 
chimney and foundation and place a marker. There are no plans as 
yet for reconstruction. 

The Commission met in Lincoln on four occasions during the year 
and discussed Park activities and the land acquisition program. 

The Park Service changed its policy on tenancy. Life estates 
and term estates up to 25 years have been granted. 

Hartwell Tavern on Virginia Road in Lincoln underwent restora- 
tion. 

As a result of a public meeting held on March 14, 1974, con- 
struction of a parking lot at the North Bridge in Concord was de- 
ferred. 

Construction was started on the Battle Road Visitor Center at 
the site of the former Chabot Animal Hospital on Route 2A in Lexing- 
ton. This facility will serve as the main orientation point for 
visitors and will house a major audio-visual installation with two 
100-seat auditoriums. Completion of the building is expected by 
July, 1975. 

The project to convert the barn at The Wayside in Concord was 
completed. Also restoration work on the Elisa Jones shed in Con- 
cord was accomplished. 

At the June, 1974, meeting of the Commission, representatives 
of the Celebrations Committees of the various towns were invited. 
Mr. John Carman, Chairman of Lincoln 1975 Bicentennial Commission, 
explained Lincoln's plans for the Bicentennial. 

1974 was an extremely active year for Minute Man with many new 
projects underway. Planned for the summers of 1975 and 1976 is a 
series of lectures in cooperation with the Lexington Historical 
Society. Also, a Youth Forum involving young people in the Bi- 
centennial will take place. 



119 



The "Touch and Try" room at the North Bridge Visitor Center, 
where children can play with reproductions of 18th century toys, 
proved to be most successful. 

Reenactments of 18th century town meetings, involving volun- 
teers, were held during the summer. Minute Man has an enrollment 
of 1,249 volunteers, who are very active in the Park. Although 
one of the smallest parks in the National Park System, it has the 
largest enrollment of volunteers. 

A new Master Plan for the Park will be underway soon. Pre- 
planning public meetings will be held. 

During 1974, seven structures were offered for sale (to be 
moved). Three of these buildings were donated to the Lexington 
Housing Authority. Four were unable to be sold and had to be de- 
molished. Of these four buildings, three were located in Lincoln, 

Plans to have Daniel Chester French's famous statue of the Min- 
ute Man undergo preservation work were made. A temporary exhibit 
will be placed at the site at the North Bridge while work on the 
statue is in progress. 

In 1972, the Lincoln Selectmen appointed the Relocation Com- 
mittee. Its' duty: to locate buildable acreage in Lincoln for 
Lincoln residents displaced by the Minute Man National Historical 
Park and the relocation of Route 2. The committee is composed of 
George Kornfeld, chairman, Carol Elwood, Eleanor Fitzgerald, Cuido 
Perera and Elmer Ziegler. The Rural Land Foundation (a group of 
Lincoln residents) has bought land and created a 7-lot subdivision 
called Orchard Lane (formerly Smith-Norton land), which it has 
offered to the Relocation Committee. A road has been cut into the 
land and will soon be finished so that 7 lots will be ready for 
sale in the spring of 1975. Some park residents have expressed 
interest in these lots. 



120 



LINCOLN 1975 BICENTENNIAL COMMISSION 

John W. Carman, Chairman 

Saville R. Davis 

Margaret Flint 

Stanley Heck 

Daniel A. Maclnnis , Jr. 

Julia S. Pugh 

Sumner Smith 

Frederick P. Walkey 

Margaret L. Wengren 

Katharine S. White, Vice-chairman 

Margaret M. Martin, ex officio 



Prior reports of this Commission have focused on three princi- 
pal areas', namely, (1) permanent improvements that will commemorate 
the Bicentennial, (2) appropriate activities celebrating the period, 
and (3) planning to cope with the physical problems that will devel- 
op from the expected visitor influx. 

(1) Permanent Improvements : 

The Library Historical Room financed by a Town appropriation 
of $2,500, by public subscription of over $18,000, and by a Massa- 
chusetts Bicentennial Commission matching grant of $3,604, is 
nearing completion and will be dedicated in May 1975. 

DeCordova Museum and the Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School 
have also received matching Bicentennial grants of $15,000 and 
$1,000, respectively, to apply toward projects. of a permanent nature 

Consideration is being given to making application for matching 
State Bicentennial funds for other projects of merit. 

(2) Activities Celebrating the Bicentennial : 

The Bemis Trustees have announced a fine series of four pro- 
grams that relate to the Revolutionary period. A series of similar 
quality is planned for the winter of 1975-76. 

The Lincoln Historical Society is moving ahead with a program 
to identify and authenticate those houses which existed in Revolu- 
tionary times and which still exist in Lincoln. 



121 



At Town Meeting in March there will be a brief re-enactment of 
a typical Lincoln Town Meeting of 1775 which will highlight the 
critical problems of that period. 

The re-enactment of Paul Revere' s capture will take place on 
April 12th. On April 18th the Minute Men will re-enact the 
"Sounding of Alarm in Lincoln Center". On April 19th at 6:00 A.M. 
the Minute Men will gather and march to Concord to participate in 
the Concord Parade. Memorial Day and July 4, 1975, will be cele- 
brated in the customary manner. 

The Commission is planning a Town-wide celebration for the 
July 4, 1976, weekend including a big parade- (fireworks?) -picnic- 
barbecue-dancing-competitions, etc. Precise scope of this under- 
taking will depend on the interest aroused and the funding avail- 
able. 

The Lincoln edition of the Concord Journal will carry a weekly 
program of Bicentennial events in 1975. 

Publications: 

Each household has received a copy of "Trial by Fire" by 
author and long-time resident Paul Brooks. 

A planned booklet containing photographs of present day Lincoln 
has been delayed. The hoped for participation by Town photograph- 
ers in the picture contest has been somewhat disappointing so the 
mid-December 1974 deadline has been extended to July 15, 1975. 

The third publication has been changed slightly to include 
reports on Bicentennial Events and an early map of Lincoln together 
with pictures and comments on the Pre-Revolutionary houses still in 
existence in Town. These latter publications will be available 
to residents at a price to cover printing expense. 

(3) Visitor Influx. : 

The passage of time has confirmed our view that the critical 
period for visitor impact will be on April 18, 19, 20, 1975. 

Concord is planning to close access to the town the morning 
of April 19, 1975, when a pre-determined number of vehicles have 
entered. Traffic will thus back up in Lincoln as it works its 
way to hoped for parking at Hanscom Field and an ensuing long walk 
to the parade. 

122 



Lincoln police have been in close working association with 
neighboring departments. Plans have been established for closing 
certain Lincoln streets to all except resident travel. Other 
streets will be made one way. Police duty stations to be manned 
by both local and state police are established, extensive and coor- 
dinated communications will be in operation, medical teams with 
helicopter transport will be on duty, and overall traffic surveil- 
lance from a helicopter will be maintained. Auxiliary police 
volunteers are needed to supplement the regular force. Applica- 
tions can be secured from the Deputy Chief, Charles Doyle. 

The Minute Men will march to Concord early on the morning of 
April 19th, and we urge townspeople to join in the trip as one sure 
way of being able to reach Concord and view the parade. Busses 
will be available at a reasonable charge to transport residents to 
the Concord parade and return providing a survey shows sufficient 
demand for the service. Departure schedules will be quite early 
to avoid the potential congestion. 

In the likely event that the President comes to either Concord 
or Lexington on April 19th or 20th, the increased visitor influx 
will be offset by the availability of government personnel for se- 
curity and logistical support. 

The Bicentennial Commission is operating within appropriations 
made in 1972.-74 which totaled $15,500 including $2,500 for the 
Library and is recommending funds this year to cover increased 
printing costs, Commission mailing and other expenses, and to under- 
write the planned Town-wide celebration on the weekend of July 4, 
1976. 



123 



LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Ruth Wales, Chairman 
John Quincy Adams 
Astrid Donaldson 
John Todd 
Charles Warner 



The Lincoln Historical Commission was established by vote of 
the Annual Town Meeting of March 23, 1974 for the "preservation, 
promotion, and development of the historical assets of (the) town". 

Chapter 40, Section 8D, describes the duties as follows: 
"Such commission shall conduct researches for places of historic 
value and shall seek to co-ordinate the activities of unofficial 
bodies organized for similar purposes, and may advertise, prepare, 
print and distribute books, maps, charts, plans, and pamphlets 
which it deems necessary for its work. For the purpose of pro- 
tecting and preserving such places, it may make such recommenda- 
tions to the city council or the selectmen as it deems necessary, 
and, subject to the approval of the city council or 'the selectmen, 
to the Massachusetts Historical Commission, that any such place be 
certified as an historic landmark. The commission may hold hear- 
ings; may enter into contracts with individuals, organizations and 
institutions for services furthering the objectives of the com- 
mission's program; may enter into contracts with local or regional 
associations for cooperative endeavors furthering the commission's 
program; may accept gifts, contributions and bequests of funds 
from individuals, foundations, and from federal, state or other 
governmental bodies for the purpose of furthering the commission's 
program; may make and sign any agreements and may do and perform 
any and all acts which may be necessary or desirable to carry out 
the purposes of this section. It shall keep accurate records of 
its meetings and actions and shall file an annual report which 
shall be printed in the case of towns in the annual town report. 
The commission may appoint such clerks and other employees as it 
may from time to time require." 

In June, shortly after the members had been appointed by the 
Selectmen, the Commission was notified that the Massachusetts 
Historical Commission had requested a review of the environmental 
impact statement submitted by Lincoln Cooperative Homes with res- 
pect to the moderate income housing project adjacent to the Codman 
property. The State Survey Director, Elizabeth R. Amadon, members 



124 



of the Lincoln Commission, representatives of the State Environ- 
mental Affairs office, the Rural Land Foundation, Lincoln Coopera- 
tive Homes, and the Society for the Preservation of New England 
Antiquities, made an on-site inspection to determine whether the 
proposed project would have a negative effect on the Codman House, 
which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The 
EIS was subsequently accepted as written, stating that there was 
no adverse impact on any historic site. 

An inventory of places of historic value is a mandatory duty 
of a commission. While a survey of Lincoln's historic structures 
and sites had been made in 1966 and is on file with the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Commission, this inventory is little more than 
a listing for many of the places included. Updating and adding 
to the data on file will be the Commission's primary task. This 
is being done in cooperation with the Lincoln Historical Society. 
The Society is researching houses still standing that were here in 
1775, and the Commission is working on the rest of the houses. 
Some additional structures and sites will be included in the in- 
ventory. For this purpose, the Commission has met with many of 
the individuals and organizations in town involved in historical 
research and preservation. 

The question of requesting that the Codman barns be placed on 
the National Register of Historic Places has been investigated and 
discussed. At a meeting with the Board of Selectmen in December, 
the Commission recommended that the Selectmen put an article in 
the Annual Town Meeting warrant to consider the nomination of the 
barns to the Register for the following reasons: 

1. The Codman Estate, while divided in ownership, is a 
unique entity. The barns are a significant part of 
an outstanding historical property. As such, they 
should be included with the Codman House on the National 
Register. 

2. Listing on the Register enables the Town to apply for 
funds for historic preservation and does not restrict 
use of the buildings in any way. 



125 



Home of Samuel and Mary (Flint) Hartwell 
at time of Revolution, Restored in 1924 
and burned in February, 1968 




Interior of kitchen 



Hartwell House interior 




Front parlor 




*izM 



Upstairs parlor 



Hartwell Farm 




"Moon table" 




Lounge in "barn" 




George Farrar House, located on the west side of 
Concord Road, south of South Great Road 




Panelling removed from Farrar House, now on display 
at H. F. duPont Winter thur Museum in Delaware 








lrniture now in Smithsonian Institution and thought 
) be from Farrar house originally. 

ie Smithsonian Institution catalogs the furniture: 

}per left: Curly maple tip-top table with quatrefoil top, 

Lincoln, Mass. 
pper right: Curly maple dish-top table, Lincoln, Mass. 
enter: Oak chair table made by John Farrar^ Lancaster, 

Mass., before 1680. Top long since missing, 
ower left: Low, four-slat ladder back armchair, Lincoln, Mass 
ower right: Small maple recessed armchair, Lincoln, Mass. 



Schools, Library and Recreation 



TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Term Expires 

Francis H. Gleason, Chairman Life Member 
Thomas B. Adams Life Member 

Martha DeNormandie Life Member 

Molly K. Turner School Committee 

Appointee 1976 
John Hughes Selectmen Appointee 1975 

Dr. Harriet L. Hardy (Resigned) Elected by Town 1977 

Jane Thomas League of Women Voters Observer 



The fireproof waterproof vault, display and work room complex 
for historical documents is nearing completion. The vault already 
contains important collections of papers and letters of several of 
Lincoln's oldest families as well as old Town records. Special 
gifts have been received including a Thoreau survey of a piece of 
land in Lincoln and several commissions denoting the progress of 
John Hartwell from ensign to captain one of which is signed by 
John Hancock. Appropriate display cases will be installed for 
such materials so that exhibits of considerable historical interest 
will be on view during the Bicentennial celebration. The Committee 
for this project is very grateful to the many and very generous 
donors and particularly to the Old Town Hall Exchange. Dedication 
is planned for early May though the historical room will be opened 
much earlier. 

The DeNormandie room and the Library are greatly enhanced by 
the gift of a very handsome wooden table enclosing a record player 
with earphones in memory of Newton P. DeNormandie. 

Our personable and efficient librarian Brit a Mack left us at 
the end of the summer, and we welcome Jean Tenander as our new head 
librarian, Mary Ann Tricarico as our new assistant librarian, and 
Nancy Gregory on the circulation desk. 



126 



The Lincoln Library steadily increases its role as a social and 
educational center as well as a repository of a broad collection of 
excellent books. The monthly Thursday morning programs for adults 
have been organized by Ellen Cannon and continue to be very popular. 
The theme of the talks this year was "Lincoln's Past and Present", 
and Heddie Kent spoke in February on children's books that adults 
would enjoy. A six film program was launched on Monday nights. 
Though not well publicized there has been sufficient interest to 
suggest a more' extensive program next year. The films were ob- 
tained from the Boston Public Library's somewhat limited feature 
film collection. The Laurie Thiessen Memorial rental collection 
continues to be a highly successful adjunct to regular library oper- 
ations. 

As usual the children's department has been extremely active. 
On Tuesdays from September through June Heddie Kent gave a story 
hour for three and four year olds attended by about fifteen to 
twenty children on average. Mothers can have an extra cup of 
coffee and catch up on needlepoint and knitting. 

Once a month on Wednesday afternoons Heddie puts on films for 
children five years and older. There are two sessions since the 
attendance is roughly one hundred children in each. In addition, 
there are films once a month for children from the Coop Nursery 
School. 

The second annual Halloween party was held for children under 
kindergarten age in costumes and with a parade around the library. 
Once again children made decorations for the Christmas tree and the 
staff joined together in a party decorating the tree. 

The pages- in-training program continues for children over ten 
with a long waiting list. This program teaches children how to use 
the library and stimulates interest in books. A substantial number 
return in later years as paid pages. Heddie gave book talks at the 
Hartwell and Smith School libraries this year, and the first grades 
and kindergarten came to the Library in the fall and spring for a 
story hour. 

As in past years the Garden Club continues to decorate the 
Library with flower arrangements and holiday plants which is an im- 
portant addition to the decor. The Library enjoys the services of 
several interested volunteers who take on book mending, filing , and 
a number of other miscellaneous projects. The Trustees are most 
grateful to them and to a loyal and energetic staff. 



127 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 
STAFF - 1974 



Jean Tenander 
Mary Ann Tricarico 
Helen Kent 
Linda Collins 
Marjorie Snyder 
Mary Irwin 
Margaret Sykes 
Nancy Gregory 
Audrey Dedinsky 
Phyllis MacFarland 



Head Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 

Children's Librarian 

Assistant Children's Librarian 

Cataloguer 

Technical Services 

Adult Services 

Circulation 

Typist 

Secretary- Bookeeper 



Hours Open: Monday, Wednesday and Thursday 
Tuesday, Friday and Saturday 

Closed legal holidays and 
Saturdays in August 



10:00 to 8:30 
10:00 to 5:00 



STATISTICS 1974 
January 1-December 31, 1974 



General 



Number of days open 
Fines collected 



Acquisitions 
Books 



Inventory, 1973 

Purchases 

Gifts 

Total inventory and acquisitions 

Discarded or lost 

Inventory, 1974 

Records 

Inventory, 1973 

Purchases 

Gifts 

Total inventory and acquisitions 

Discarded or lost 

Inventory, 1974 



284 
$2,526.26 



40,444 

2,674 

343 

43,461 
1,315 

42,146 



1,821 

114 

33 



T7W 

87 

1,881 



128 



Audio-Visual 

Inventory, 1973 164 

No purchases 

Inventory, 1974 164 

Circulation 

Adult 46,407 

Juvenile 29,482 

Total 1974 circulation 75,889 



129 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

Janet Daniels, President 

Chester C. d ' Autremont , Vice President £ Clerk 

Walter J. Salmon, Treasurer 

Francis S. Andrews 

Gregory Kolligian 

Robert B. Newman 

John Pike 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

A dreary, gray and gas line-filled January opened the 24th 
year of the DeCordova Museum. Although our membership numbers did 
not decline, our daily attendance dropped significantly during this 
trying period. Thanks to much cooperative work between the Regis- 
trar, teachers and students devising car pools, the School enroll- 
ment figures remained steady, and so we entered into a brighter 
spring, both literally and figuratively. Our exhibition schedule 
remained firm, and with the advent of warm weather and shorter gas 
lines, our day by day attendance picked up with our usual large 
crowds on the week-ends -- many enjoy the Park and the sculpture 
outdoors. The summer school program was not restricted to child- 
ren this year. There were classes in Japanese culture and art for 
parents during school hours, and evening seminars for parents un- 
able to attend during the day. This led to a record number of mem- 
bers participating in the summer class program. 

On the week-ends, of course, we had our second year of Sunday 
concerts — twelve in number — offering a rounded series in a most 
diverse manner. There was literally some music for everyone at 
some point during the summer. Our most grateful thanks, indeed, 
go to the Codman Trust which has funded this program since its in- 
ception. A side attraction on Sunday afternoon was the intro- 
duction of sidewalk bazaars of art and crafts run by the teachers 
and students of the Museum School. This provided an outlet for 
the work of a number of people who had not thought to join the "pro- 
fessional ranks". We had several sell out crowds — by sell out, 
we mean that all parking lots are full, as we are discouraging any 
parking on Sandy Pond Road. Our average attendance ran over 1000 
persons. 

Starting the fall season, there was a chance for our students 
to put on an exhibition at the School while the Museum prepared a 
show of art that Greater Boston corporations have collected. These 

130 






two shows held great significance for the Museum. The school show 
not only provided a locale for the exhibition of student works, but 
also mirrored the quality of the education being offered by the 
Museum and the dedication of our teachers to their own professional 
standards as well as the standards of the Museum. The "Corporations 
Collect" show gave us an insight into the type of art that has been 
bought in the last ten years as opposed to works being exhibited. 
Also, this show helped to point up the importance of corporations to 
the structure of Museum fundings. As prices rise, museums need to 
broaden their bases for funding, as individual memberships cannot be 
priced out of acceptability by the public. Corporate memberships 
represent additional funding for museums as well as providing ser- 
vices for corporate employees which, in many cases, are basically 
educational -for the persons involved. As the support for museums 
grows, art appreciation and education follow, yielding future fund- 
ing through new individual memberships. 

As the fall wore on, the Museum put on its last major show of 
the year, "New Architecture in New England", which ran until the end 
of the year and proved both provocative and creative. This show 
will be taken on tour during the next two years. A new kind of 
opening was instituted during this show, which proved so successful 
that we will continue this practice in our coming exhibitions. This 
involved being open four Tuesday nights during the exhibition and 
giving a lecture during these hours. We have had morning lectures 
routinely, but obviously, evening lectures reach a totally differ- 
ent group. As opposed to our evening lectures in the past, these 
are free and are individual lectures in themselves, instead of be- 
ing one in a series. Already the wisdom of continuing these has 
been proven, as reservations for the lectures during the first show 
of 1975 stand at a high figure. 

The Board of Directors turned its thoughts to '75, which is 
not only New England's first Bicentennial year, but also is the 
Museum's 25th birthday. The Museum opened its doors officially on 
September 30, 1950, and we will take note and celebrate our birthday 
in September of this year. 

Our Annual Appeal was run this year as a telethon at the Museum, 
asking for special consideration as the Bicentennial rolls around. 
The money raised will be used to fund our Bicentennial exhibitions 
these next two years. The telethon ran for 15 nights at the Museum 
using about 100 volunteers (including the Board of Directors and 
some staff members) and soliciting the entire membership. There 
are benefits over and above the amount of money received in follow- 
ing through on a project of this sort. It pointed up to many how 



131 



important each member is to the Museum and how worthwhile volunteer- 
ing your time and effort can be. My thanks to all who participated, 
not only those who gave, but also those who asked them to give. 

The Board looks forward with conficence to the year 1975 as our 
program appears to be stronger than ever. But with the financial 
instability of the country and the ever-rising price of gasoline and 
other things, we cannot foresee our own future. We have, however, 
closed out the past year with a well-balanced budget and a small 
cash reserve as we move on into these unpredictable times. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



Financially, 1974 was a satisfactory year for the Museum. In- 
creased income from admission fees, from the Museum School, from 
foundation grants, from corporate and individual memberships, from 
the DeCordova Trust, and from the Annual Appeal managed to offset 
the impact of inflation and the higher costs of creating several in- 
novative, high-quality exhibitions. Thus, in 1974, income exceeded 
expense by $25,382; whereas, in the previous year, expense had ex- 
ceeded income by $8,042. 

The challenge in the current year will be to maintain the finan- 
cial progress shown in 1974. Economic conditions and uncertainty 
over the availability and price of gasoline could seriously affect 
several sources of Museum income, including individual and corporate 
giving, admission fees from attendance at exhibits and concerts, and 
School enrollment. Unfortunately, there is more uncertainty con- 
cerning income than expense. Because of the impact of inflation, 
expenses will almost surely rise. To deal with the financial un- 
certainties of 1975, we are monitoring key indices of our situation, 
such as membership and attendance, as well as income and expenses, 
closely. Should income fail to meet expectations, we will react 
as vigorously as we can to reduce expenses. 

The vicissitudes of 1975 will undoubtedly test our metal as 
managers. Hopefully, what we learn from the experience will en- 
hance our skill in providing members and others with an ever broader 
and more sophisticated range of programs and activities, while con- 
currently maintaining budgetary discipline. 



132 



EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 
Frederick P. Walkey 



This year, we've adopted a slightly different format for our 
Annual Report to the Town. In addition to the detailed President's 
report, which precedes this report, we have included reports by 
three department heads, the Director of the School, the Director of 
Development, and the Curator of the Museum. Each will detail her 
activities for the year. We have chosen this format to emphasize 
the fact that the Museum now has three departments and three com- 
petent department heads. 

It is apparent when you read this report that the School plays 
a very significant part in the life of the Museum. It is the 
largest single income producer and it serves several thousand in- 
dividual students. With the addition of a new Curator, Eva Jacob, 
who replaces Carlo Lamagna, the curatorial department takes on even 
greater importance than it did in the past. Eva brings a very 
substantial intellect and knowledge to her job. Those of you who 
attended the exhibition of New England architecture and read her 
authoritative catalogue on the exhibition need no further proof of 
what I say. Her presence on the staff allows us to undertake ex- 
hibitions that we were not able to attempt before. 

All of the exhibitions which are planned for 1975 and 1976 are 
thematic exhibitions, each requiring a considerable amount of re- 
search and knowledge in order to present them with the scholarly 
underpinning they require. Thanks to the generous support of all 
of the members of the Museum, who contributed a total of more than 
$30,000 to this year's Annual Appeal, and to the various State and 
Federal agencies and private funding sources, we are also able to 
undertake these more costly exhibitions. I think we can say 
without contradiction that, exclusive of the Museum of Fine Arts, 
the exhibitions being presented by the DeCordova Museum are more 
comprehensive and more important than those presented by other 
museums in greater Boston. Last year's exhibition of American 
Metalsmiths is a good case in point. It was the largest and most 
comprehensive exhibition of the work of American jewelers and silver- 
smiths ever assembled in the United States. At the same time, we 
retain our abiding interest in the work of New England artists. 
The summer exhibition of drawings by artists of the six state region 
was not only a beautiful and comprehensive exhibition, it was the 
first major drawing exhibition held in this area in over ten years. 



133 



Having already alluded to the increased cost of the exhibitions, 
I think you might be interested in looking at the income figures in 
the annual report. You will note that the efforts of the Develop- 
ment Director to secure funding for some of the special exhibitions 
have been successful. Last year, special grants amounted to slight- 
ly over $15,000. We are optimistic that in the coming year special 
grants may be almost twice that amount. Ann Russell, who was ap- 
pointed Membership Director, and subsequently appointed to the new 
position of Development Director, has been an invaluable addition to 
our staff. Her report is a good summary of her accomplishments. 

The fourth person on the Museum staff whose contribution needs 
to be recognized is the Assistant Director. Miriam Jagger, who 
has been on the staff for two decades, serves the Museum in a variety 
of ways. She is primarily responsible for the financial manage- 
ment of the Museum and for its publicity and public relations, and 
in 1974 undertook an important new responsibility. She was pri- 
marily responsible for planning not only the twelve summer concerts, 
but all of the Museum's gallery concerts as well. The capacity 
audiences demonstrated that the concerts were popular and that there 
was also a real need in this area for such programming. It would 
have been virtually impossible to present the summer concerts with- 
out the generous support of the Codman Trustees. Benjamin Fawcett 
and Roger Tyler have been generous to the Town in many ways. Their 
support of our summer concerts under the appropriate title of the 
Dorothy S. F. M. Codman Concerts is one of the several ways in which 
they have been generous. We all owe them a considerable debt of 
gratitude and thanks for their generosity. 

The Museum published a phone book and distributed it to the 
Town in 1974. Joan Kennedy, Administrative Assistant in my office, 
was largely responsible for the organization, the ad selling, and 
the editing of the phone book. She was very ably assisted by our 
professional staff and by Mrs. John Garrison, who did the layout of 
most of the ads in the phone book. 

Volunteer support of many of the Museum programs is essential. 
Typical of the ways which volunteers contribute is the membership 
program sponsored by the President's Council. Under their guid- 
ance, the Museum has expanded corporate members to nearly 60 com- 
panies who are listed as active members. John Cantlin, as Chair- 
man of the Council, and Jack Carter, as Membership Chairman, have 
been effective in helping us reach that impressive total. 



134 



It is relatively easy to write about what happened in 1974. 
Until this year it has also been relatively easy to look into the 
future and to plan with some certainty, both as to income and pro- 
gram. Planning for 1975 and 1976 is not easy. However, looking 
ahead to 1975 and 1976 we feel we have certain obligations which we 
would like to fulfill. We think that museums are uniquely equipped 
to offer leadership in celebrating the Bicentennial. We plan to 
offer a series of exhibitions related to the past and to the present 
and, to some extent, the future. Our exhibitions will be devoted 
to an emphasis on the American spirit and the American dream. One 
way to celebrate the Bicentennial is to rededicate ourselves to some 
of the concepts stated by our founding fathers and to try to find 
qualities in our contemporary society which give meaning to those 
ideals. It is sometimes difficult to bring a fresh point of view 
to the qualities of personal liberty, to freedom and to independence 
of spirit. 

But over the next two years we will try to explore those ideas 
as they are exemplified in both the performing and the visual arts. 
If conditions permit, we will carry out the ambitious program of ex- 
hibitions which we have planned, and we will use the amphitheater to 
present programs in the performing arts which enhance the celebra- 
tion of the American Bicentennial. It seems to me that the least 
we can do every 100 years is to recognize that in Lincoln we live on 
hallowed grounds which we must share with our American neighbors. 
At the Museum we shall be as hospitable as possible and try in every 
way we can to make a contribution to the celebration. At the same 
time, we will try to do everything within reason to protect the pri- 
vacy of our Lincoln residents and our immediate neighbors. There 
will undoubtedly be some conflicts arise in this difficult situation, 
but we shall be responsive and responsible, recognizing that we have 
obligations to a great many different interests. 

In conclusion to my section of this report, I would like to 
thank the officials of the Town of Lincoln for their cooperation, 
especially the Selectmen and the Police Department. I would like 
to publicly thank those citizens of Lincoln who are members of the 
Museum for their support. It is difficult to operate a non-tax sup- 
ported institution, and I want each of you to know personally that 
your contribution to the Museum is vital and deeply appreciated. In 
addition to the members of the President's Council, I would like to 
thank all of the women who serve on the Associate Council, those from 
Lincoln and the surrounding communities, for without their dedicated 
assistance, it would not be possible to operate the complex and multi- 
faceted program which the Museum undertakes each year. Typical are 



135 



the programs arranged by the Lincoln Committee under the leadership 
of Anne Rooney and later in the season, by Enid Beal. They pre- 
sented four lively and successful programs for Lincoln members and 
guests. We thank them both for their exceptional competence and 
commitment. 

And finally, I wish to thank the staff and the Board for their 
creative and energetic participation and for giving unselfishly as 
they all do, without exception. This year saw the inauguration of 
a new President of the Board, a long time member, Janet Daniels, who 
replaced another long time member, Bob Newman, who served from April 
of 1971 to March of 1974. Bob Newman served most effectively and 
we are pleased that he will continue to be a member of the Board of 
Directors. 

If we feel frustrated in any area, it is primarily that we are 
not able to expand the physical plant of the Museum in order to 
serve you and the artists and the performing arts more fully. I 
hope that the day will come that the plans which have sat on the 
shelf for five years can become a reality. 

Lastly, I hope that you will all join us in September of this 
year as we plan a memorable celebration of DeCordova's 25th anni- 
versary. 



DIRECTOR OF THE SCHOOL 

Katherine Steichen 

1974 was an expansive, exciting year for the School and its 
related programs. Our capacity registration not only held firm, 
but managed to increase to 3250 adults, teenagers and children en- 
rolled in 245 classes. 

In response to student requests, a special week of intensive 
all -day workshops was included between the spring and summer terms. 
These classes were enthusiastically received, as they gave students 
the rare opportunity to devote themselves almost exclusively to 
their work for a specified time period. A similar week is being 
planned for 1975. 

The traditional arts of Japan provided the theme of our child- 
ren's interdisciplinary summer program. Japanese and American 



136 



teachers (as well as children) joined together to form a stimulating 
workshop environment, which was augmented by special demonstrations 
of Japanese calligraphy, cooking, classical dance and chanting from 
the Nob Theater. Our Japanese theme also extended to other educa- 
tional activities for adults, including classes, studio demonstra- 
tions and an evening lecture series. 

A new DeCordova tradition may have emerged this summer with 
the Sunday afternoon outdoor exhibitions of our student and faculty 
work. The excellence and diversity of the work, combined with 
the exhibiting artists' presence, became a major attraction for the 
concert crowd and a delight for the artists involved. 

The close of the concert series marked the beginning of our 
fall term registration. During our annual School Open House, 
teachers met with prospective students while former students outdid 
themselves demonstrating their skills to thousands of guests. 

During the fall of '74, preparations were completed for De- 
Cordova's new Docent Program. Thanks to support from the Massa- 
chusetts Council for the Arts and Humanities, training sessions be- 
gan to prepare a corps of "docents" to lecture to groups who visit 
DeCordova, as well as to groups within surrounding communities. A 
number of docents will work with social studies teachers at Lin- 
coln's Brooks School to plan and implement a cultural enrichment 
program within the school. The Docent Program is a pioneer effort 
for DeCordova, which, with continued interest and financial support, 
promises a new spectrum of educational service for the community. 



MUSEUM CURATOR 

Eva Jacob 

I think of the Curator's work at DeCordova as broadly educa- 
tive: assembling significant exhibitions and then making them count 
as much as possible to the viewer. I am particularly interested 
in providing our visitors with the kind of background which will 
enable them to relate exhibitions to significant aspects of the 
past and present. 

The taped slide presentations giving historical background 
which I have prepared for all 1974 exhibitions were one part of this 

137 



effort, and will continue with future exhibitions. An expanded 
evening lecture program, presenting speakers on various subjects 
related to exhibitions, is planned for 1975. We have found that 
keeping the Museum open on a weekday evening brings together people 
who enjoy discussion. We plan to continue these evenings, some- 
times with lecturers, sometimes with a staff member present to an- 
swer questions. 

With Mrs. Roland Shaine, who gives a great deal of time to the 
care of the Slide Library, we are supplementing the Museum's 15,000 
art slide collection, especially in the area of 19th century Ameri- 
can art. With the help of Mr. Eliot Bartlett and Mrs. Henry Novak, 
who generously give their time to this office, we are updating the 
Library's 1450 volume collection and doing advance research on next 
year's ambitious schedule of Bicentennial exhibitions. 

In 1974, twelve new works were acquired for the Permanent Col- 
lection. Most of the nearly 350 works in the collection are on 
loan to Corporate Members participating in the loan exhibition pro- 
gram. This year's accessions include seven prints acquired by 
purchase: "Gard", a drawing by Jack Wolfe, a gift of the artist 
from the DeCordova Open Drawing Competition '74; three paintings 
received as a gift from Mrs. Joshua Binion Cahn, in memory of Philip 
H. Walker; "Energy", by Manabu Mabe; "Plums and Pears", by Alfred 
H. Maurer; and "Nocturne", by Guiseppe Santomaso. A drawing, "Bun- 
raku I", by James Rosenquist, was received as a gift from Henry 
Harrison. 

"New Architecture in New England", the first show I organized 
for the Museum, was a new kind of architecture show, which presented 
architecture as art to a museum public, through large mural photo- 
graphs and multi-media slide projections which showed each building 
in relation to its surroundings. The exhibition's purpose was to 
give recognition to outstanding architectural design in recent years, 
and to increase public understanding and appreciation of innovative 
architectural design. The exhibition has been requested for a two- 
year tour by the International Exhibitions Foundation of Washington, 
D. C, and will be seen at sixteen institutions in various parts of 
the country. 



138 



DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT 

Ann Russell 

As of December 31, 1974, there were 2,703 Museum members, in- 
cluding 411 Lincoln families. The renewal rate for the year 1974 
was 66%. The number of new members who joined during the year was 
847. Membership income was just above $88,000. Despite the re- 
cession, and an increase in the basic membership dues from $25 to 
$30, membership remained more or less stable during 1974. The goal 
for 1975 is to maintain the current number of members, although we 
would ideally like to bring the number up to 3,000. 

The corporate membership program has proved to be very popular, 
largely because the Museum offers the loan of art works from its 
permanent collection as one of the benefits of membership. As of 
December 31, 1974, there were 57 corporate members. The total cor- 
porate membership income for 1974 was over $18,000. Hundreds of 
employees of member corporations used complimentary passes to visit 
the Museum. The other services which DeCordova offers to corporate 
members, in plant programs and company evenings at the Museum, were 
not used heavily. We hope to encourage this type of cooperation 
between the Museum and the business community in the future through 
the Museum's new docent program. Our goal for 1975 is to bring the 
number of corporate members up to 75 and to increase the membership 
income to $24,000. 

One of the most significant things about 1974 was that we ended 
the year in the black for the first time in several years, showing 
a surplus of income over expenses of $22,000. The annual appeal, 
to support the Museum's Bicentennial exhibitions for 1975, was an 
unqualified success. More than $31,000 was raised, as compared to 
$17,000 in 1973. A telethon involved more than 100 volunteers in 
contacting every member personally to ask for a donation. There 
were 910 donors to the 1974 appeal, as compared to about 200 donors 
in 1973. This means that almost 40% of the membership participated 
in the annual appeal. 

Grants to the DeCordova Museum during 1974 included $8,000 
from the Codman Trust to support the summer concert series, $5,000 
from the National Endowment for the Arts for the architecture show, 
$1,000 from Design Research for the architecture show, $15,000 from 
the Massachusetts Bicentennial Commission for the completion of the 
outdoor amphitheater, and $1,000 from the Howard Johnson Foundation 
for the amphitheater fund. 



139 



The opening of a development office at the Museum represents a 
commitment to a more aggressive policy of pursuing grant support. 
Grants already made for 1975 include $2,800 from the Massachusetts 
Council on the Arts and Humanities for a docent program, $2,500 from 
the Massachusetts Council on the Arts and Humanities to support the 
New England Women show, $9,400 from the National Endowment for the 
Arts for the summer craft show, and $12,000 from the National Endow- 
ment for the Arts to support the loan exhibitions to corporate mem- 
bers. We are applying for additional grants to help pay the expense 
of the exhibition program, the outdoor concerts, summer programs at 
the school, and the expansion of the docent program. 



140 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM FINANCIAL REPORT, 1974 
with comparable figures for 1973 

INCOME 1973 1974 



DeCordova Trusts $110,867.00 $132,904.33 

Corporate Membership 11,600.00 18,700.00 

Individual Membership 75,526.00 86,375.25 

Contributions 32,786.00 41,864.63 

Grants 3,000.00 15,750.00 

Sale of Publications 2,263.00 2,541.20 

Admission, Exhibitions 32,528.00 37,368.60 

Admission, Concerts § Lectures 10,516.00 8,786.44 

Museum School $ Store 177,563.00 226,430.24 

Benefit Events 25,251.00 

All Other 13,055.00 7,496.50 

TOTAL INCOME $494,955.00 $578,217.19 

EXPENSE 

Administration $ Development 101,566.00 123,929.12 

Program (exhibitions, events, 

library, collections) 72,303.00 106,562.74 

Museum School § Art Supply 

Store 171,562.00 188,733.04 

Buildings $ Grounds (main- 
tenance, repair) 57,504.00 58,248.50 

Benefit Events 18,617.00 

Capital Expense (furnishings, 

equipment, construction) 32,180.00 17,420.00 

Printing £ Publications 49,265.00 57,941.12 

TOTAL EXPENSE $502,997.00 $552,835.17 

EXCESS OF INCOME OVER 
EXPENSE (EXPENSE OVER 

INCOME) (-$8,042.00) $ 25,382.02 

Cash Balance, December 31, 1974 

General Funds $27,505.29 

Kenneth Hess Memorial Fund 1,000.00 

Payroll Reserve Fund 12,000.00 

Total Cash Funds $40,505.29 

141 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
December 31, 1974 

Janet Daniels, President 

Chester C. d'Autremont, Vice-President § Clerk 

Walter J. Salmon, Treasurer 

Francis S. Andrews 

Gregory Kolligian 

Robert B. Newman 

John A. Pike 

DeCORDOVA MUSEUM PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL 
December 31, 1974 

John H. Cant 1 in, President 

John Carter, Corporate Membership Chairman 

Richard Bailey 

Ephron Cat 1 in, Jr. 

Thomas Diab 

Alexander Dusek 

Ewan W. Fletcher 

Kenneth J. Germeshausen 

Elliott V. Grabill 

Everett Grossman 

Robert Kavanaugh 

John McHugh 

Howard 0. McMahon 

Paul Schratter 

Stephen Stone 

Robert A. Weaver, Jr. 

DeCORDOVA MUSEUM, LINCOLN COMMITTEE 
1974 



Enid Beal, Chairman 
Eleanor Fernald 
Patricia Griffith 
Barbara Leggat 
Anne Rooney 



142 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM STAFF 
December 31, 1974 

Frederick P. Walkey, Director 
Miriam Jagger, Assistant Director 
Joan Kennedy, Administrative Assistant 
Martha DeFrancesco, Bookkeeper 
Joan Anderson, Receptionist 

Eva Jacob, Curator 

Diane Osmond, Curatorial Secretary 

Ann Russell, Development Director 
Susana Lannik, Corporate Representative 
Toni Cant 1 in, Membership Secretary 
Billi Luciano, Membership Clerk 

Bruce Fenton, Designer-Photographer 
Ken Baker, Printer 

Frank Balduf, Custodian 
Floriy Campobasso, Caretaker 
Arthur Kurtz, Assistant Caretaker 

DeCORDOVA MUSEUM SCHOOL STAFF 
December 31, 1974 

Katherine Steichen, Director 

Miriam Weinstein, Registrar $ Librarian 

Louise Taylor, Store Manager 

Pat Jensen, Secretary 

John Anderberg, Custodian 



143 






RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Enid Beal 

Joseph Murphy 

Virginia Niles 

Roberta Spreadbury 

Lee Todd 

Harry Had ley, Chairman 



The Recreation Committee has spent much of the year in formu- 
lating guidelines around which we operate, so that we and the town 
can understand what is meant by recreation. Activities that are 
developed will: 

a) Be on a self-supporting basis to as great a degree as 
possible. Since the range of activities in leisure 
time is ever-changing, diverse, and widely varying in 
cost according to individual taste, we do not feel 
that most activities should be supported from general 
funds. 

b) Be diverse in nature. This committee is devoted to 
making possible the enjoyment of leisure time. It has 
no other purpose. Therefore, team and individual, 
active and passive, and sheer relaxation, all have a 
part in the diverse activities. 

c) Be scheduled in advance. Many activities occur and 
people have not made their busy calendars free. An 
annual calendar of major events is being prepared. 

d) Be coordinated with the many activities in town which 
are recreational in spirit, but not sponsored by the 
committee. Our interest in these activities is in 
their existence. 

All activities assume the willingness of people to make them 
work. Thank you all. 

The year 1974 marked the opening of the new Codman Swimming 
Pool, made possible through the generosity of the Estate of Dorothy 
S. F. M. Codman. With special features to make it suitable for 
use as both a teaching and a recreational facility, the pool opened 
on July 4th, under the direction of Mrs. Jean Johnson. The Pool 
Committee of Nelleke Allen, Ann Brown, Harry Hadley, Bud Reed and 



144 



Beth Sutherland then challenged the other town committees to a re- 
lay race for the Golden Flipper (and lost to a dynamic DeCordova 
team). The pool was a success - the kids - all ages - loved it. 

The Lincoln Summer Day Camp opened with a capacity crowd of 
350 kids, and with the pool nearby, the Directors, Mike and Marie 
Talbot, could concentrate on the camp and not on buses. The re- 
sults were outstanding, and they promise us more and exciting things 
in 1975. The camp committee, Enid Beal, Carolyn Henebry, Joan Hill, 
Phyllis and Louis Mutschler, Marilyn O'Rourke, Diana and Henry Shep- 
herd, Mary and Fred Silver stein, and Jane Tat lock, all worked hard, 
and we had a top-flight camp. 

The July 4th parade featured floats by both the Pool Committee 
and the Recreation Committee, and pass-out buttons with the theme 
"Come Play With Me". 

And play we did. The non-summer activities were smaller in 
number of participants, but all the more fun. We had a Bike Tour 
on Patriots' Day, with Mike Farny laying out the race and tour 
courses. We had square dances - Bobbie Spreadbury is the expert 
on these - and they were sellouts every time. Fred Walkey's Ten- 
nis Committee kept the courts perfect, and crowded all summer, and 
the September Tennis Tournament yielded top caliber tennis, well 
worth watching even if you can't climb very far up the ladder. 
Weekly skating at the Sudbury rink, a Buddy Werner ski team which 
wins meets, a teaching program run for us by the Nashoba Ski Hill, 
and outdoor skating on Pierce Park Pond and Mt. Misery Pond, make 
our winters warm. Have you tried the evening athletic programs 
all winter at the school gym? It's play with friends, and all 
recreation. 

The summer baseball program for children was as always im- 
mensely popular, with about 200 boys and girls playing regularly 
in a local league. This effort, and a 6 team league for the older 
athletes, are self-supporting, requiring only the noise of the crowd 
to keep them going, - and the willing help of many volunteers who 
give hours of their time. 

Try it - it's fun! 



145 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

J. William Adams 

Robert Frank 

John B. French 

Muriel Weckstein 

Lynn Donaldson, Chairman 



The School Committee is completing its first year with five 
members instead of three. The expansion to five members has 
brought out new insights and viewpoints, and contrary to Parkinson's 
law, has not substantially increased the work load, for which we are 
all grateful! 

Dan Cheever's Report of the Superintendent thoroughly and 
thoughtfully covers the current state of the schools, and therefore 
we would like simply to list some of the overriding questions with 
which we are dealing this year -- questions which are to some ex- 
tent unanswerable, but which must not be ignored as we make deci- 
sions. 

1. Our numbers are declining. When are we too small to do 
a first rate job? 

2. How individualized can education become and still be a 
commodity the public can afford? What are the trade- 
offs between individualization and a sense of community 
and tradition? 

3. How widely should we interpret "special needs" now that 
Chapter 766 of the state's laws pertaining to education 
mandates that we meet them all? With all the emphasis 
on special needs is the more average child receiving a 
fair share? 

4. What is t\\e . relative weight of school and parental input 
in decisions about a child such as class placement? 

5. We frequently hear that students are coming to school 
with more and more problems which they are acting out -- 
broken homes, unemployment, economic crisis, nobody at 
home, etc. To what extent is the school responsible for 
helping? Can we ignore needs? Are there services the 
town could provide to give the schools more support in 

146 



their efforts to deal with student's problems? To what 
extent are those who are acting out affecting the behavior 
and performance of other students? 

6. Boston is struggling with mandated integration in its 
schools. Does Lincoln have a responsibility to Boston 
and the metropolitan area as a whole in this or any other 
matter? 

7. To what extent are the quality of the town and the quality 
and cost of the schools interdependent? Do we need a 
By-90 committee for the town? 

8. Can we find alternative means of providing educational 
services which will slow down the annual rate of increase 
in the cost of the services, without sacrificing the 
quality of the services? 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Daniel S. Cheever,Jr. 

Last year, we reported in these pages on several aspects of the 
Lincoln and Hanscom elementary schools. In particular, we commented 
on the underlying rationale for our educational program, and the 
financial problems confronting our system. In this report, we 
would like to highlight other aspects of the Lincoln school system. 

After several months of careful work, we think a new direction 
and momentum are established and taking hold. Prompted by the 
shared concerns of both parents and professional staff, this dir- 
ection includes: 

1. Curriculum coordination : A major priority is to streng- 
then the quality, and improve the coordination, of the 
instructional program from Kindergarten to eighth grade 
and beyond. While this task takes time, we are just be- 
ginning to see important results of work begun last year. 
For example, our language arts program has been revised, 
based upon Lincoln's long-standing expertise with a modi- 
fied Spaulding approach. The modified program is being 
implemented this year, and will be improved further this 

147 



summer by our new language arts curriculum committee with 
teacher representatives from every school on both campuses. 
Second , a mathematics committee has been formed, which will 
work intensively this year and during the 1975 summer on 
revision of the math program. Third, Hartwell and Smith 
Schools have been reorganized along lines recommended by 
the majority of the staff last spring -- the plan aroused 
considerable community concern -- and numerous in-service 
curriculum workshops are being held for teachers from all 
schools on both campuses. Finally, the Brooks elective 
program has been evaluated and modified (and will be eval- 
uated again), and committees will be formed shortly to 
examine the continuity of our program across all grades 
K-8 and with the high school. Underlying all of this 
varied curriculum activity is greater attention to basic 
skills and high expectations for student performance, 

2. Staff Resources : Last year our enrollment decline and 
inflationary cost pressures forced us to cut 2.0 classroom 
teachers, 2.1 specialists (music, library, physical educa- 
tion), 1 principal, and a secretary on the Lincoln campuses 
and several comparable positions at Hanscom. With fewer 
students again next year, we must cut 2.0 more classroom 
positions. However, we are recommending no further cuts 

in specialist teachers or administrative staff in order to 
maintain our present program offerings. 

3. Goals and Assessment : A task force composed of parents and 
teachers completed work on a statement of philosophy for 
the Lincoln school system. After revision and adoption by 
the School Committee, we began a process of operationaliz- 
ing this statement into behavioral outcomes for students. 
Work in this area is proceeding slowly, but we hope it will 
yield important results. In related areas, we have devel- 
oped a new evaluation procedure and observation instruments 
for teacher performance, and are currently reviewing our 
approach to evaluating student performance. 

4. Special Needs : The State's new special education law, 
Chapter 766, has just taken effect, and already it is ex- 
erting influence on our school system. Its purpose is to 
integrate students with special needs into the regular 
classroom and, if evaluation proves this cannot be done, 
these students are placed in private institutions at public 
expense. For many years, Lincoln has tried to be sensi- 
tive to special needs students, and hopefully the new law 



148 



is increasing our ability to provide them with a sound edu- 
cation as part of our regular program. At the same time, 
the law has had financial and administrative effects on our 
schools, and will continue to influence all communities for 
several years. 

5. Communications with the Town : We have tried to provide 
citizens with more information on the school programs. Ex- 
tensive budget mailings and subsequent neighborhood meet- 
ings have tried to provide facts and figures before the 
School Committee reaches final budget recommendations for 
Town Meeting. A new parent information folder attempted 
to describe the school programs in some detail, while the 
Fence Viewer has assisted in publicizing agendas for School 
Committee meetings in advance. Finally, the LSA under the 
combined leadership of Carolyn and Mike Henebry, has organ- 
ized an extensive, valuable series of workshops on various 
aspects of the schools. Lincoln's community interest in 
its elementary schools is extraordinary and commendable. 
It challenges us to respond adequately. 

Despite our satisfaction with the events reported above, we are 
concerned about several aspects of our school system. First, we do 
not educate some students as well as we should. This is made clear 
in comments from both parents and teachers, as well as in the results 
of evaluations mandated by Chapter 766. We do not yet understand 
sufficiently well the many reasons for this problem, but we are con- 
cerned. Secondly, we are pressured from opposite directions re- 
garding the instructional program: on the one hand, State policy 
(via Chapter 766) and our own philosophy dictate a highly individ- 
ualized program for each child. On the other, our budgetary con- 
straints and the priorities of program coordination run counter to 
an extremely individualized approach. Underlying both forces is 
the need for more consistent quality and excellence in what we do 
ourselves or expect of children. Finally, the continued enrollment 
decline, and corresponding need to dismiss good teachers each year, 
adversely effects staff morale at all levels. The cumulative 
effect of this situation over several years has become especially 
severe. For example, we now realize that our after school sports 
program on the Lincoln campus has been curtailed due to last year's 
cuts, and the library advisory committee has just reported on sev- 
eral ways in which the library services at Hartwell- Smith should be 
strengthened. 

Despite these problems our administrators and teachers are an 
exceptional group of men and women — hard working, dedicated to 

149 



Lincoln, Hanscom and Boston children, unusually skilled, and willing 
to extend themselves far beyond the usual requirements for their 
jobs. I continue to be impressed with, and grateful for, the high 
quality of our professional staff. 

Special mention should be made to several individual events in 
the past year. 1974 saw the retirement of Timothy Rhodes from 
Brooks School, where he had energetically served as teacher and 
principal for eleven years. The year also marked the retirement 
of Robert Leach. As principal for many years of Hanscom Upper 
School, Bob provided steady leadership for many children. The Lin- 
coln Teachers' Association (LTA) elected Lila Wasson of Hanscom 
Primary School as President, and she is continuing the tradition of 
professional leadership executed by her predecessor, Ruth Mahoney. 
Finally, Jack French has announced his intention to step down from 
the Lincoln School Committee when his present term expires in 
March 1975. After seven years' service, we will miss his commit- 
ment to students, his sense of fairness and accepting attitude 
towards others, and his calm leadership. He has exemplified the 
Town's spirit of community participation. 

1974 was a difficult year for public education. Rising costs, 
declining enrollments, Watergate, and growing public skepticism 
about the quality of public education created unusual pressures on 
children, parents, teachers, and administrators. As we have tried 
to respond to these pressures, we have appreciated the Town's con- 
tinuing support for its public schools. Over the years, this sup- 
port has built a first-class school system, and we are hopeful we 
can carry forward this tradition. 



150 



CLASS OF 1974 



Geoffrey East Apthorp 
William Armstrong 

Wayne Barker 
David 0. Beenhouwer 
Andrea Michel e Berman 
Kenneth John Boyer 
Markley H. Boyer, Jr. 
Eve Elizabeth Buckler 

Ann Carley 

Abbie Marilyn Coffin 

Kimberly Frost Comstock 

Ellen Coons 

Kristin Louise Cooper 

Laurie Anne Cotoia 

Thomas Richard Cummings 

Jonathan C. Cunningham 

Karen Marie Davidson 

Evan A. Davies 

George Dixon 

Frank A. Domenichella, III 

John Buchanan Drury 

Robert Murray Elwood 

Donna Lucine Felegian 
Eric Taft Fernald 
John Flansburgh 
Sarah Franklin 
Lisa Ernestine Freed 
Patrick Friel 
Gabrielle Fusillo 

Laurel Ann Gagne 
Meryl Golden 
David J. A. Grim 
John Gustafson 

Ingrid Louise Haessler 
Glenn Philip Harris 
Geoffrey Henebry 
Seth Hewitt 



Clifford Hickman 

Matthew C. Hill 

David Hoch 

Richard J. Horwitz 

Stacy Hunter 

Deirdre Mairi Hutchinson 

Karl Allan Ingard 

Walter Philip Jacob 
Katherine Marie Jenal 
Thomas Jennings 

Kelly Kamborian 
Helen Kaplan 
Lee Koehler 

Benjamin Lavine 
Henriette Lazaridis 
Gerald Leape 
Catherine Lewis 
Mark S. Lo 

Claudia MacLeod 

Maris Marie McConnon 

Edward McDougall 

John James McDougall, III 

Judith McGarry 

Donna Ellen McKnight 

Mark McPherson 

Squire Mahoney 

William John Mahoney 

Judith Mason 

James W. Mitchell 

Heather Mohr 

Car la Morse 

Jennifer Adrienne Mozzi 

Keith Jon Nelms 

Daniel F. O'Brien 

Alfred Peter Pace 
Marianne Page 



151 



Stephen J. Paige Thomas James Zondiros 

Rebecca E. Palmer Karen Ann Zuelke 

John Panetta 

James Pastoriza 

Andrew Clement Pickett 

John Hyde Pickett 

Susan Wendell Pike 

James Pryor Ragan 

Lynda Diane Rasco 

Paul Joseph Redmond, Jr. 

Jennifer S. Reed 

Carrington Rhodes 

Mark Richter 

John Rosane 

Peter Rossoni 

Patricia Elizabeth Rowe 

Kathleen Ann Ryan 

Mary Ann Sartori 

Andy Mark Schecter 

Linda Scheuer 

Bradford Smith 

Cary L. Smith 

Alexander Campbell Stanley 

Carl F. Sweeney, III 

Katherine Sykes 

Paul L. Sylvia 

Royce Taylor 
Anthony J. Thomas 
Erik Thomas 
Evan Frame Tinder 
Mary F. Tracey 
Gail Turner 

Sarah Rachel Van Leer 

Leslie Weckstein 
Joy Kay What ley 
David Williams 
Frank Wood 

Robin Alexandra Yeuell 
David Yore 



152 



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154 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



ENROLLMENT AS OF OCTOBER 1, 1974 




















Total 


School 


Grade 
Kdg. 


Boys 
37 *( 5) 


C 


iris 


Total 
59 ( 9) 


per school 


HARTWELL- 


22 


( 4) 




SMITH 


Sp. CI. 


3 




3 




6 






1 


28 


( 3) 


40 


( 6) 


68 ( 9) 






2 


50 


( 4) 


45 


( 5) 


95 ( 9) 






3 


36 


( 6) 


38 


( 5) 


74 (11) 






4 


44 


( 2) 


44 


( 7) 


88 ( 9) 






5 


49 


( 3) 


50 


( 6) 


99 ( 9) 








247 


(23) 


242 


(33) 


489 (56) 


489** 


BROOKS 


6 


49 


( 9) 


69 


(13) 


118 (22) 






7 


42 


(10) 


57 


(7) 


99 (17) 






8 


48 


( 4) 


61 


( 5) 


109 ( 9) 








139 


(23) 


187 


(25) 


326 (48) 
Total Lincoln 


326 
815*** 


*( ) Met co 
















HANSCOM 
















PRIMARY 


Kdg. 


41 




50 




91 






1 


34 




43 




77 






2 


42 




43 




85 






3 


38 
155 




48 
184 




86 
339 


339 


HANSCOM 
















MIDDLE 


4 


37 




40 




77 






5 


45 
82 




50 
90 




95 

172 


172 


HANSCOM 
















UPPER 


6 


54 




46 




100 






7 


42 




42 




84 






8 


49 
145 




39 

127 




88 
272 
Total Hanscom 


272 
783 



GRAND TOTAL FOR ALL SCHOOLS 



1,598*' 



** 18 Kindergarten students expected to enroll in January for total of 

507 in K-5 
*** will be 833 in January 
**** will be 1616 in January 



155 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
Administrative Staff 



Daniel S. Cheever, Jr 
Virginia Soderling 
John J. Carroll 

Philip J. Reddy 
William M. Thompson 
William S. Warren, Jr 

Meredith Jones 
Ronald A. Hadge 

Donald R. Waldera 



Cheryl Ciechomski, R.N, 
Gladys Crumb, R.N. 

Hours : 





Appointed 


Superintendent of Schools 


1973 


Administrative Assistant 


1970 


Supervisor of Buildings 




§ Grounds 


1960 


Director of Pupil Services 


1966 


Metco Coordinator 


1971 


Principal, Hartwell-Smith 




School 


1970 


Principal, Brooks School 


1970 


Principal, Hanscom Upper 




§ Middle School 


1970 


Principal, Hanscom Primary 




School 


1972 


School Nurses 





Lincoln Schools 
Hanscom Schools 

Office of the Superintendent 
8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 
Monday - Friday 



"NO SCHOOL" SIGNALS 

Local signals will be given on our fire alarm system 
6:30 a.m. 3-3-3, repeated at 
7:00 a.m. 3-3-3, repeated at 
7:10 a.m. 3-3-3 

Radio announcements will be read between the period of 6:30 a.m. and 
7:30 a.m. Please refrain from tying up local phone lines to school 
officials, fire station and bus operators. 



(WCOP. ..1150K: 



WBZ...1031K; WHDH...850K) 



Announcements regarding "NO SCHOOL" are made by the Lincoln Superin- 
tendent of Schools for the Lincoln Elementary Schools (Grades K-8) 
only. Announcements for the Regional High School are made by the 
Regional Superintendent of Schools and will be designated "Lincoln- 
Sudbury Regional High School". 



156 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

William T. Maloney, Chairman 
Joan Wofford, Vice Chairman 
Martha C. A. Clough 
Richard H. Davison 
J. Roger Flather, Jr. 
Henry M. Morgan 

SUPERINTENDENT 

David L. Levington 



In this year of 1974. we can find no better summary of the state 
of the High School than the words of the Sudbury School Committee 
penned in 1890: 

"The Committee take pleasure in reporting to the inhabi- 
tants of the town the continued prosperity and general 
success of their schools during the past year. Taken 
as a whole, they believe that the schools have fully sus- 
tained their previous good reputation; that there has 
been a decided improvement in the matter of deportment 
in nearly all of them; that the advancement, in the vari- 
ous departments of study has been substantial; that they 
will compare favorably with the same schools in previous 
years, or with schools of the same grade in other towns 
under the same conditions and circumstances; and the com- 
mittee cheerfully give all the credit of the generally 
satisfactory condition of things to the teachers and the 
scholars, realizing as they do that their own imperfect 
supervision has had very little to do with it." 

We have completed the first full year under a new administra- 
tion. It has been a year of stabilization: the student population 
seems to have leveled off; large numbers of new faculty are no longer 
required each fall. Increased attention has been focused on the 
needs of students, particularly freshmen and those students who are 
not participating fully in the life of the school. The appearance 
and maintenance of the physical plant has improved and more effective 
communication with the communities has begun. 






157 



ELECTIONS 

The School Committee wishes to acknowledge with gratitude the 
contributions of Frederick Walkey, who retired after six challenging 
years on the Committee; and to welcome Richard Davison who was 
elected in March to succeed him. In the same election Henry Morgan 
was re-elected, after eleven years service on the Committee. 

RETIREMENTS 

This year saw the retirement of Alfred C. Derosier and Sherman 
Spaulding. Mr. Derosier has been Supervisor of Buildings and 
Grounds for seven years and is succeeded by Mr. Richard Santella. 
Mr. Spaulding was for eleven years a valued member of the faculty 
in Mathematics. We wish them both a satisfying, well-deserved re- 
tirement. 

STUDENTS 



Major efforts have been directed to improving the school en- 
vironment for students, and for freshmen in particular. 

Hall Reorganization 

To improve the environment for entering students, the role of 
the School's five Halls has been revised. 

The Halls have moved from a limited counseling, attendance and 
discipline function in the direction of the wider role of schools 
within a school. Beginning this year, each freshman has been 
scheduled, insofar as possible, to take courses from teachers in his 
or her own Hall. Because each freshman is known to several of the 
Hall faculty members, ready and easy interchange of information on 
academic and other problems is facilitated. Hall lounges have been 
provided and Hall Forums organized as a new form of student govern- 
ment. 

The NIMBUS Program, (our highly respected "Outward Bound" type 
activity) has been made a "Hall Program" and is focused on freshmen, 
to contribute further to the new student's orientation to the school 
and the Hall faculty. 

THE ADVISOR PROGRAM 

Beginning in September, 1974, the faculty began a plan under 
which every student at the Regional will have a Faculty Advisor. 

158 



At this time each faculty member is advising four freshmen and four 
sophomores. A student will remain with his or her faculty advisor 
for the full four years, so in another two years each 'teacher will 
be advising sixteen students. This program, which has been de- 
veloped over a number of years in West Hall is seen as filling a 
definite need; that of assuring that at least one adult in the 
school knows each student well. A further benefit has been in 
seeing that each faculty member knows students as "whole people", 
rather than possibly only as a "math student" or "history student". 

Advisors work under the direction of the Hall Counselors, and 
help students with the kinds of problems that arise normally in a 
large school. They review course-selections and change requests 
with students, as well as grades. Parents are urged to get to 
know their student's advisors, who can provide another valuable 
channel for communication between the home and the school. 

ATTENDANCE 

Although certain students continue to have problems getting to 
class, the results of an attendance study done in the Halls reveal 
that class-cutting is not an overall school problem. The vast 
majority of students meet their class commitments. Those who do 
not are known to the school and through the school to their parents. 
We will continue to work with these individual students and their 



"It is true that absence and tardiness are sometimes 
unavoidable, but in many cases they can be prevented by 
the parents of the scholars or by the scholars them- 
selves, as the responsibility for this evil must rest 
upon the parents or scholars, or both, but not at all 
upon the teachers." * 

In spite of our best intentions, we cannot honestly say that 
any significant inroads were made this year on the problem of the 
"corridor kids" — those students who prefer to spend their un- 
assigned time in the corridors and who are not motivated to take 
part in the life of the school in any real way. While it is cer- 
tainly unrealistic to expect that teachers, in the few contact hours 
available, will work regular and repeatable miracles of motivation 
on a sizable number of apathetic students, nevertheless the school 
will continue to seek ways in which to reach these students. In 
this attempt we cannot overemphasize the importance of parental in- 
volvement and support. 

* Report of the School Committee, Sudbury Town Report, 1890 

159 



PROFESSIONAL STAFF 

The School Committee and Administration remain committed to 
the policy that has guided the high school since its inception, 
that of attracting and retaining the most competent teachers availa- 
ble. In order to do so, while paying competitive but not exorbi- 
tant salaries, we have worked hard to develop and follow procedures 
which make Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School a stimulating and 
satisfying place to work, as well as to learn. 

This will be an even more challenging task for us all as our 
enrollment stops growing. Along with the benefits of a more ex- 
perienced and cohesive staff we will also face the possible problems 
of a staff growing older and more settled. To counteract this the 
faculty is investigating a number of ways of assuring a continual 
renewal and revitalization through staff-development activities, ex- 
changes with other systems, and other means. 

A new Faculty Senate provides a mechanism for improved com- 
munication between the Faculty and the Administration. Through 
their Standards and Expectations Committee, the Faculty has drawn 
up guidelines (which have been approved) outlining the role a member 
of the professional staff is to play in the day-to-day life of the 
school. A new merit pay plan has been instituted and a formal 
evaluation procedure for professional staff and administration is 
now being developed. 

CHANGES IN CURRICULUM 

As in previous years the faculty has developed and implemented 
a number of new and exciting courses this year, such as the SCAR 
program (described elsewhere), the Executive Intern Program, "To 
See Ourselves" (a course in cultural anthropology), "Feminine Fix-it" 
and so forth. These programs add "spice" to student life here, and 
are well recognized by students and staff for their value, interest 
and variety. 

However, the vast majority of our efforts, and of student time, 
continue to be expended in studying and learning rather traditional 
bodies of skill and knowledge, albeit they are now taught in newer 
and better ways than in the past. We still devote most of our in- 
structional time to the departments of English, History, Foreign 
"Language, Mathematics, Science and Physical Education. A parent, 
upon examining a student's course of studies, will find that in 
nearly all cases most of the student's time is spent in these basic 
areas. 



160 



Significant progress has been made this year, as it is every 
year, in improving the already high quality of instruction. This 
year major effort was put into our English Program, particularly at 
the freshman level. These and further efforts to improve teaching 
and learning of basic skills are continuing. 

Similarly each department faculty is continuing to review and 
improve its offerings. Gradual, rather than radical, changes are 
being made in what we teach and how we teach it. Interested citi- 
zens are referred to the Program of Studies and Program Budget , each 
of which is available through the school's main office. 

The School Committee continues to believe that its building 
should be an educational center, but that education should not be 
bounded by its walls. This year and next we will continue our 
efforts to educate our students to the world they will enter. Al- 
though all departments share in this preparation for life, we give 
special emphasis to our programs in Career Exploration, Alternate 
Semester, Executive Interns, Child Development, Work Study, METCO, 
and Student Exchange. 

PHYSICAL PLANT 

The appearance and maintenance level of the building and 
grounds have greatly improved. We plan to continue to improve the 
condition of the plant and to make it as available as possible to 
the communities when it is not in use for school activities. A 
student committee called Student Committee for Architectural Reno- 
vation (SCAR), working with the advice of an architect, has re- 
designed the old art areas as a new home for the Audio-Visual De- 
partment. SCAR will continue to assist the administration in reno- 
vating and updating the building. 

The drainage program for the Athletic Fields, approved by Sud- 
bury and Lincoln last year, has been completed on schedule and with- 
in the budget. By all accounts an excellent job was done by the 
contractor. We look forward to returning the fields to service 
as soon as the turf is ready. We continue to hope for the eventual 
completion of the building expansion program begun in 1972. In 
spite of the best efforts of the Regional Building Committee, chaired 
by Mr. Robert Bierig, the final details of construction continue to 
progress slowly. 

FINANCE 



The problems of school finance are being pursued on two fronts 
The 1975-76 budget was reviewed program by program, to allow study 

161 



of educational programs on a cost per pupil or cost per credit basis, 
as well as in its traditional form. Unfortunately, the growing 
inflation impacts the school as severely as it does the home. 

To take a longer range look at school costs, the School Com- 
mittee has applied for and received a $70,000 grant from the Nation- 
al Institute of Education to study the educational implications of 
making significant budget reductions. It is the aim of the Com- 
mittee to develop educational alternatives and bring them to the 
public for a full discussion. It may be that the communities, as 
a result of this study, will choose to restructure the educational 
program to achieve these savings. Or, the communities may decide 
they do not wish to accept the changes which would be required by 
such budget cuts. The study will require eighteen months to com- 
plete. Co-principal investigators are School Committee members 
Joan Wofford and Henry Morgan. They would welcome any suggestions 
or comments from interested citizens, and can be contacted at 
259-0885. 

CONCLUSION 

It has been a full year with successes in many areas, promise 
in some, and continued frustration in others. You, as parents and 
taxpayers, have many reasons to be proud of your school. Still, 
there continue to be students who do not make the most of the oppor- 
tunities available, and students, who, for one reason or another, 
we at the school have not reached. The School Committee, Adminis- 
tration and Staff are committed to providing the best possible edu- 
cational experience at a cost per pupil comparable to that of ten 
good neighboring systems -- but we can't do it alone. We can do 
it with your help. Under the program offered at the high school, 
parental involvement is most important, both' in course selection and 
in dialogue with teachers on the student's progress. 

"Another matter shown by the registers is that very many 
parents of the scholars are seldom, if ever, seen in the 
schoolrooms; this, the Committee take the liberty to say, 
is not as it should be. Parents can contribute to the 
interest and success of the schools in various ways, but 
in none more effectively than by frequent visits to the 
schoolrooms; and the reports of scholars, or teachers 
even, will not always give them so reliable information 
concerning the condition and progress of the schools as 
they can gain by frequent visits." * 



♦Report of the School Committee, Sudbury Town Report, 1890. 

162 



During the coming year we shall strive to further develop a 
working partnership between the school and the home. We ask you 
to join us. 






163 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



TREASURER'S REPORT 
January 1, 1973 - June 30, 1974 



Total cash balance, Januarv 1, 1973 



33,629.84 



District Fund 



Cash balance, January 1, 1973 



(34,393.41) 



Receipts: 

Lincoln assessment 
Sudbury assessment 
State reimbursement: 

Building construction 

Transportation 

Planning funds 

Stabilization - matching funds 
Investments 
Federal aid, PL 874 
Blue Cross - Blue Shield 
Disability insurance No. 2 
Tax sheltered annuities 
Building construction No. 5 
Miscellaneous income 



$1,052,375.18 
3,661,441.89 

451,730.23 

219,057.13 

144,244.00 

100,000.00 

9,570,000.00 

34,638.00 

39,229.78 

1,482.04 

41,238.24 

240.00 

226,075.32 



15,541,751.81 



Disbursements: 
Operating budget 
Debt service - interest 

- principal 
Investments 

Building construction No. 
No. 
Outlay 

Community services 
Blue Cross - Blue Shield 
Disability insurance No. 
Tax sheltered annuities 



4,594,664.14 

239,791.25 

630,000.00 

8,445,000.00 

1,453,745.30 

1,260.00 

63,476.47 

2,441.71 

38,093.92 

1,426.38 

39,461.24 



15,509,360.41 



Cash balance, June 30, 1974 



(2,002.01) 



Federal Reimbursement PL 874 



Cash balance, January 1, 
Receipts 



1973 



Disbursements 
Cash balance, June 30, 1974 



164 



$ 34,638.00 
34,740.00 
69,378.00 
34,638.00 

$ 34,740.00 



Chapter 506 Metco 

Cash balance, January 1, 1973 $ 4,783.50 

Receipts 102,007.00 

106,790.50 
Disbursements 100,285.10 

Cash balance, June 30, 1974 * 6 50 c 40 

PL 90-576 Nursery School Grant 1972 

Cash balance, January 1, 1973 $ 2,948.43 

Receipts 

2,948.43 
Disbursements 2,948.43 

Cash balance, June 30, 1974 $ 

PL 92-318 Nursery School Grant 1974 

Cash balance, January 1, 1973 $ 

Receipts 16,500.00 

16,500.00 
Disbursements 14,849.33 

Cash balance, June 30, 1974 $ 1,650.67 

Nursery School - Tuition 

Cash balance, January 1, 1973 $ 3,823.42 

Receipts 13,197.68 

17,021.10 
Disbursements 6,331.98 

Cash balance , June 30, 1974 $ 10,689.12 

Title II Library 

Cash balance , January 1, 1973 $ 52.29 

Receipts 2,914.81 

2,967.10 
Disbursements 2,967.10 

Cash balance, June 30, 1974 $ 

Title II 1973 Special Purpose 

Cash balance, January 1, 1973 $ 

Receipts 1,005.76 

1,005.76 
Disbursements 1,005.76 

Cash balance, June 30, 1974 $ 



Title II 1974 

Cash balance, January 1, 1973 $ 

Receipts 2,625.00 

2,625.00 

Disbursements .00 

Cash balance ,June 30, 1974 $ 2,625.00 

165 



E.N.E.R.G.Y 

Cash balance, January 1, 1973 $ 

Receipts 9,600.00 

9,600.00 

Disbursements 6,741.01 

Cash balance, June 30, 1974 3 2,858.99 

Towel Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1973 $ 3,114.05 

Receipts 2,551.00 

5,665.05 

Disbursements 4,283.06 

Cash balance, June 30, 1974 $ 1,381.99 

Cafeteria Fund 



Cash balance, January 1, 1973 $ 16,176.87 

Receipts 209,108.41 

225,285.28 
Disbursements 213,009.55 

Cash balance, June 30, 1974 $ 12,275.73 

Athletic Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1973 $ 1,360.69 

Receipts 3,293.00 

4,653.69 
Disbursements 4,652.50 

Cash balance, June 30, 1974 $ 1.19 

Adult Education 

Cash balance, January 1, 1973 $ 343.72 

Receipts 18,519.80 

18,863.52 
Disbursements 17,651.80 

Cash balance, June 30, 1974 $ 1,211.72 

Music Scholarship Fund 

Cash balance, January 1, 1973 $ 316.62 

Receipts 26.20 

342.82 
Disbursements 



Cash balance, June 30, 1974 $ 342.82 



166 



Howard Emmons Fund 



Cash balance, January 1, 1973 
Receipts 

Disbursements 
Cash balance, June 30, 1974 

Cannon- Kirshner Fund 



Cash balance, January 1, 1973 
Receipts 

Disbursements 
Cash balance, June 30, 1974 

Total cash balance, June 30, 1974 



158.34 
13.07 



171.41 



171.41 



307.32 
25.43 



332.75 



332.75 



S 72,784.78 



167 



GRADUATES - CLASS OF 1974 



Ackerman, Stephen Kirk 
Ackroyd, Susan E. 
Adamson, Gary J. 
Ahrens, Elisabeth 
Ainsworth, Teresa L. 
Albrecht, Cheryl A. 
Alexander, Karen Lee 
Allen, David R. 
Ames, Joyce Roberta 
Amesbury, Anne E. 
Armington, Gary W. 
Austen, Howard C, Jr. 

Bahlkow, Karen Marie 

Baldi, Karen 
♦Baldwin, Margaret T. 

Baldwin, Robert Scott 
♦Baldwin, Sarah T. 

Barlow, Charlene 

Barsano, Karen 

Bauder, Janette Marie 

Bellows, Kevin M. 

Beltramini, Lisa Ann 

Benedict, Regis M. 

Bennett, Keith J. 

Bent, Lincoln T. 

Berdy, Jerome A. 

Bernetich, Nancy J. 

Bianchi, Louise M. 

Bigwood, Nancy A. 

Bisson, Marie 

Blake, Susan J. 

Bleckley, Janet 

Boles, Laura L. 

Bonia, Carol 

Bortle, Susan Barbara 

Bowden, John J. 

Bowen, Robert I. 

Boyd, Patricia A. 

Boyle, Anna M. 

Bradley, Harland F. 
*Breidenstein, Cheryl A. 

Brettel, Stephen A. 

Briand, Alphonse J., Jr, 



Brown, Elizabeth 
Brown, Timothy Francis 
Brown, Todd H. 
Burgarella, James W. 
Burk, Lesley Mitchell 
Burns, Janet 
+Burroughs, Laurie K. 
Buscemi, James A. 
Byington, Roy E. 

Cacciola, Douglas 

Caffrey, Sara E. 

Caia, Corrado 

Cain, James J. 

Calkins, Thomas 

Campobasso, Diane Elizabeth 

Caplan, Robert H. IV 

Caras, Matthew Lewis 

Caras, Stefan 

Carley, Thomas 

Carpano, Francis G., Jr. 

Carter, John R. 

Castellano, Dawn 
+Cawthon, Flora K. 

Cellucci, Robert G. 

Cialdea, Margaret Jean 

Clark, Deborah Ann 
*Clark, Martha 

Clark, Nancy J. 

Clark, Sherrill E. 

Clausen, Barbara A. 

Coates, Samuel 

Colatosti, Cheryl A. 

Collins, Mark T. 

Connors, Maureen F. 

Cook, Maureen Sheila 

Coolbaugh, Brian Lee 

Corbett, Susan 

Cosgrove, John P. 
*Costa, Victoria T. 

Cox, Richard A. 

Crawford, Linda L. 
+Creaser, Brett P. 

Cron, Mark C. 






170 



Cullinan, Mary Ann 

Curran, Ann 

Cur ran, Karen J. 

Davis, Brian C. 
Davis, Nicholas Phillip 
Davis, Paul Andrew 
Davis, Theodore R. 
Day, Kenneth Peter 
Day, Thomas Earl 
DeBaryshe, Thomas N. 
+DeLuca, Claire Leslie 
Dempsey, Janice M. 
Deveneau, Michael 
Dexter, Elizabeth 
DiPalma, David 
Doe, Deborah 
Doherty, -Sheryl J. 
Donahue, Denis M. 
Donald, David 
Donnell, Leslie 
Dorris, Richard A. 
Dreher, Janet L. 
Drum, Kenneth F. 
Drury, Peter L. 
Dugan, Steven J. 
Dunne, Nora T. 
Durning, John S. 

Eadie, James 
Eaton, Gregory C. 
Eliason, Eric C. 
Espinosa, Laurel N. 

Faneuf , Patricia Anne 
Feldman, Arnold Louis 
Fenijn, Karin 
Fisher, Melissa Jean 
Fitzgerald, Beth A. 
Fitzgerald, Maurice J., Jr. 
Fitzgibbons, Jane Lee 
Flathers, Jean Anne 
Fougere, Alan J. 
Foust, Janice B. 
Fox, Linda Jean 
Frederick, Patricia Ann 



Gagne, Lawrence E., Jr. 

Gallerani, David S. 

Gallo, William P. 

Gardiner, Ann T. 

Garrigan, Edward F. 

Gause, Jean C. 

Gervais, Brigitte F. 
+Gil, Andrew 

Gillig, John P. 

Gitlin, David 

Gluek, Mary Margarethe 

Gold, David E. 

Goode, Heather M. 
*Gottschall, John A. 

Grande, Lorna M. 

Grant, Douglas R. 

Gray, Glenn A. 

Greaves, Mary Ann 

Green, Robert 

Greene, Susan M. 

Griffith, Joe 

Hagenian, Ann M. 
Halloran, Linda M. 
Hammer, Benjamin H. 
Hammond, Cheryl Ann 
Hannon, David Carl 
Harding, Cheryl Ann 
Harrington, Daniel 
Harvey, Cynthia Ann 
Haworth, Robert B., Jr. 
Healy, Liam Michael 
Heffernan, Michael Edward 
Helgeson, Mark S. 
Henderson, Florence 
Henry, Barrington A. 
Higdon, Dirk W. 
Hill, James A. 
Hill, Kathleen S. 
Hill, Lynne D. 
Hirshberg, Carol R. 
Holland, Nicholas 
Holland, Richard K. 
Horn, Peter B. 
Home, Matthew R. 
+Howe, Penelope J. 



171 



*Squire, David Whitford 
St. Croix, Susan C. 
Stafford, Beverly 
Stanley, Sarah Walker 
Steinhilper, Anne C. 
Stephens, Lee Cameron 
Stockwell, Amy Medlyn 
Stone, Judith L. 
Streit, Andrea L. 
Streit, Anthony Lloyd 
Striker, Christina Janette 
Summers, Deborah Marie 
Sutherland, Jane 
Svolopoulos, Euclidis 
Swan son, Karen A. 
Swenson, Debra L. 

*Sykes, Ellen E. 
Sylvia, Craig L. 



White, Cathy A. 

Wilson, Sanford E. 
* Winer, Eric Paul 

Wiper, Susan Elaine 
*Wolfe, Steven Mark 
*Woo, Patricia 

Woodbury, Peter R. 

Woodward, Donna L. 

Wright, Lynn Adrienne 

Wurlitzer, James E. 

Wyman, Jonathan C. 

Yarbrough, Dean S., Ill 
Young, Lisa V. 

Zarilli, Gerald V. 
*Zaumseil, Kathy J. 



Taylor, Carolyn P. 
Thurmond, Lisa J. 
Titus, Elizabeth Ann 
Toler, Mary Evelyn 
Towle, Bradley E. 
Tr ev i s an i , Raymond 
Tristan, Sarah Cook 
Trumble, Catherine Ann 



Cum Laude 
In absentia 



Valentino, David 
Vannerson, Stephen H. 
Van Tol, Christine E. 

Wahl, Thomas H. 

Walker, Nancy 

Walkey, Margaret G. 

Walsh, Colleen T. 

Walsh, Guida Clair 

Walsh, Patricia A. 

Walter, Pamela M. 

Warner, Sandra L. 
*Waye, Wendell James 

Weinstein, Gregory D. 
*Weiss, Elizabeth Rebekah 
*Wentworth, Margo Lynn 

Wesley, Diane 

Westgate, James W. 

Wheeler, Linda C. 



174 






TUITION PUPILS ATTENDING OTHER SCHOOLS 
October 1, 1974 



1972 



1973 



1974 



Agricultural High School, Walpole 

Carroll School, Lincoln 

Concord Minuteman Workshop 

Framingham North High School, Special Class 

The House, Lexington 

Newton Technical High School 

South Middlesex Regional Vocational 
Technical School 

Sudbury Public Schools, Special Class 

Waltham High School, Special Class 

Waltham Vocational High School 

Wayland High School, Special Class 

Totals 





1 


2 

1 
1 


1 




1 


2 


3 


5 


2 


5 


4 




1 


5 


1 




1 


5 


3 


1_ 


11 


13 


21 



DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS ATTENDING REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
October 1, 1974 



Lincoln 
Sudbury 
Other tuition 
METCO 
Totals 

Boys 
Girls 
Totals 

9th Grade 
10th Grade 
11th Grade 
12th Grade 
Post Graduate 
Totals 



1972 



1973 



1974 



429 


387 


373 


1475 


1516 


1513 


9 


14 


14 


41 


42 


64 


1954 


1959 


1964 


981 


990 


970 


975 


959 


994 


1954 


1959 


1964 


526 


515 


476 


517 


512 


501 


429 


495 


497 


478 


437 


489 


4 


- 


1 


1954 


1959 


1964 



175 



ANNUAL REGIONAL DISTRICT ELECTION 



The Regional District Election was held in conjunction with 
the elections in Lincoln and Sudbury on March 25, 1974, and certi- 
fications of the results were received from George Wells, Town 
Clerk of Lincoln, and Betsy M. Powers, Town Clerk of Sudbury, as 
follows: 



For Three Years: 
Henry M. Morgan 
Richard F. Brooks 
Lawrence Bussey, Jr, 
Richard H. Davison 
Blanks 



Lincoln 




Sudbury 


Total 


979 




435 


1414 


300 




1066 


1366 


232 




619 


851 


561 




1416 


1977 


296 




500 


796 


Lily T. 
District 


Spooner 
Secretary 





178 



STUDENT EXCHANGE COMMITTEE 

Marcia Rarus, Co-Chairman 
Vickie Kerrebrock, Co-Chairman 



The Student Exchange awarded partial scholarships to five 
junior ambassadors who spent the summer of 1974 abroad. Leslie 
Cheatham travelled to France, Bruce Huie to the Dominican Republic, 
and both Sallie Baldwin and Tim Sykes to Switzerland. Shawn 
Lockery engaged in an art tour which took him through many coun- 
tries in Europe and enabled him to visit Euclid Svolopolus, an ex- 
change student from Greece, who had lived with the Lockery family 
last year. 

Scholarships extended by the Cheadle Hulme School, England, 
and administered by the S. E. C, were granted for 1973-74 to 
Jadene Bump and Janet Cloud, who spent their junior year studying 
in England. For the current 1974-75 school year, the Cheadle 
Hulme scholarships have been awarded to juniors Josh Adelson and 
Jim Seaman. 

The recipient of the Teacher Ambassador Scholarship in 1974 
was Marie Talbot, who spent the summer travelling and studying in 
Peru. 

Five visiting students from foreign lands spent the 1973-74 
school year living with families in Lincoln and Sudbury while at- 
tending the Lincoln- Sudbury Regional High School. Elizabeth 
Ahrens came from Germany, Marie-Louise Kings from Sweden, Sarah 
Percival from England, Henri Ozawa from Japan and Euclid Svolopolus 
from Greece. During the current 1974-75 school year, four foreign 
exchange students are at the high school: Elsebeth Christiansen 
and Alex Rose, both from Denmark, Myriam Rozaki from Greece and 
Makoto Matsudaira from Japan. 



179 



Acton 


- 42 


Carlisle 


8 


Stow 


- 14 


Arlington 


- 95 


Concord 


- 42 


Sudbury 


- 43 


Belmont 


- 40 


Lincoln 


- 12 


Way land 


- 36 


Boxborough ■ 


- 11 


Lexington 


- 78 


Weston 


5 



Despite the more limited space in the Rose Hawthorne building 
and our new personnel, a full range of academic courses was offered, 
including mathematics, science, communications arts (English), and 
human relations (social studies) . Repeating five-week introduct- 
ory courses in eight of the following vocational and technical areas 
are also required of each ninth-grade student : 



Building Trades 

Power Mechanics 

Machine Shop 

Metals Fabrication 

Horticulture 

Graphic Arts (Printing) 



Foods 

Distributive Education 

Health Services 

Commercial Art 

Electronics 

Instrumentation 



Prior to the beginning of school, the students were -tested, 
interviewed and evaluated by the Minuteman faculty, with the 
assistance of consultants from Boston University, so that to every 
extent possible they could be placed in vocational and technical 
programs most compatible with their interests and aptitudes. 

Highlights of first months of actual operation of the new 
school included: 

1. The successful implementation and "shake-down" of our 
transportation system, a complex operation for transporting all of 
our students to and from school each day. 

2. Implementation of an innovative individualized student 
reporting system which was completed and sent to each parent in 
November. 



3. An open house evening at the Rose Hawthorne building 
attended by approximately 500 parents to acquaint them with the 
educational activities in which their sons and daughters are part- 
icipating, with demonstrations, exhibits and an opportunity for 
questions and answers. 

4. A second parents evening held in December featuring faculty 
presentations and the initial steps towards creating a parents 1 
organization. 

182 



5. Initiation of core evaluations for our students with 
special needs and the implementation of instructional programs to 
meet those needs. 

6. The initiation of student activities, including election 
of class officers and a student advisory committee, a fall dance 
attended by about 300 students, the regular publication of a school 
newspaper , and a raffle conducted by the Distributive Education 
students which made the first contribution to the treasury of the 
class of "78". 

Progress on the new school building has been slow but steady, 
and the construction is of very high quality. In December, the 
School Committee decided to accept beneficial occupancy of the com- 
pleted areas of the building so that students, faculty and staff 
could begin 1975 in their permanent quarters. The task of moving 
materials, equipment and people was accomplished during the winter 
vacation and school opened on January 13 at 758 Marrett Road, Lex- 
ington , the School's permanent address. 

In December, collective bargaining negotiations commenced 
with the Minuteman Regional Faculty Federation, Local 3191, Ameri- 
can Federation of Teachers, AFL-CIO- Kenneth Bilodeau was selected 
to act as the School Committee representative, with Ruth Wales as 
alternate. Attorney Alan S. Miller has been employed as negotia- 
tor for the School Committee. 

Looking ahead to 1975, our administration and faculty are 
developing programs and curricula for the present students when 
they become tenth graders in the fall, and are continually review- 
ing and evaluating the present year's program so as to institute 
improvements as the need is seen and to prepare* for next year's 
incoming ninth graders. The new year will see the completion of 
our building, further refinements in and automation of our budget- 
ing and business systems , and the doubling of our enrollment to 
about 900 students. Also, we look forward to developing and, 
hopefully, implementing new plans for additional services the 
District can offer on a regional basis to its twelve member towns. 

As with any new organization, the challenges at Minuteman 
have been many, and progress has at times seemed frustrating ly slow. 
The school administration, faculty, and staff have shown extraordin- 
ary dedication and willingness to exert every effort to ensure the 
success of our first operational year. We are grateful to Super- 
intendent-Director Sains and all of his staff for their hard work. 



183 



During the year four new members joined the Committee: George 
Cormier from Stow, William Fitzgerald from Lexington, and Frederick 
Heinrich from Wayland to fill the vacancies noted in our 1973 report, 
and George Banfield from Boxborough to replace Roger Morse, who re- 
signed during the summer. Roger was an original member of the School 
Committee and of its Building Subcommittee. His contributions will 
be missed. 

The entire School Committee and staff express their appreciation 
and thanks to the officials, parents and citizens of our member towns 
for their support and efforts on behalf of the new school. 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
January 1, 1973 - June 30, 1974 Budget Recapitulation 

Income 



State Aid 1971 - 1972 
State Aid 1971 - 1972 
State Aid 1972 - 1973 
State Aid, Construction 

Federal Funds 



1971 Unexpended Balance 

Interest on Bond Issue 
Balance of Premium on Bonds 

12 Towns' Assessments 



$ 13 

45 

1,103 

$1,162 

3 

7 

3 



,260.00 

890.00 

,440.00 

,134.82 



,724.82 
,500.00 
,000.00 
,500.00 



$1,176 

1 



$1,178 

6 

26 



,724.82 
,991.00 



,715.82 
,388.89 
,794.97 



$1,211 
1,234 



,899.68 
,583.00 



Rec'd 1/4/73 
Rec'd 7/2/73 
Rec'd 3/6/74 
Rec'd 3/7/74 

Rec'd 1/10/73 
Rec'd 4/20/73 
Rec'd 6/6/73 



Paid on 1st Int. Pymt 
Paid on 1st Pr in. Pymt 



$27446,482.68 



Budget 
Income 



$2,488,955.00 

2,446,482.68 

3 42,472.32 



Non- funded 



Income 
Expended 



$2,446,482.68 
2,339,977.41 
| 106,505.27 - 
70,000.00 - 
$ 36,505.27 - 



Gross Balance 
Encumbered 
Net Surplus 



184 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL 
OPERATING AND MAINTENANCE BUDGET 
1974--1975 



I. OPERATING BUDGET 



1100 School Committee 

1200 Superintendent's Office 


1973-74 
18 Months 

$ 4,780 
123,915 


1973-74 
12 Months 

$ 4,000 
77,860 


1974-75 
12 Months 

$ 5,200 
90,302 


1000 Total 

2100 Supervision 

2200 Principal's Office 

2300 Teaching 

2400 Text Books 

2500 Library 

2600 A.V. 

2700 Guidance (SPC) 

2800 Psychological Service 

2900 Educational T.V. 


128,695 

84,750 

46,700 

171,000 

12,190 

7,690 

72,300 


81,860 

58,800 

40,000 

171,000 

12,190 

7,690 

72,300 




95,502 

34,800 

32,200 

531,125 

15,000 

47,300 

32,250 

175,300 

6,000 

2,500 


2000 Total 

3100 Attendance 

3200 Health 

3300 Transportation 

3400 Food 

3500 Student Activities 


394,630 
5,330 


361,980 
5,330 




876,475 

1,500 

14,700 

150,000 

10,000 

3,000 


3000 Total 

4100 Operation of Plant 
4200 Maintenance 


5,330 


5,330 




179,200 

213,500 
53,000 


4000 Total 

5000 Fixed Charges 

6000 Community Services 

7000 Acquisition of Fixed Assets 


27,800 


25,000 
1,000 




266,500 

51,000 

1,000 

25,000 


TOTAL 


$ 556,455 


$ 475,170 


$1 


,494,677 


II. CAPITAL BUDGET 











8000 Debt Retirement 



$1,932,500 $1,932,500 $1,842,250 



185 



DISTRICT ASSESSMENT 

I . OPERATING 

Total Operating Budget $1,494,677 

Anticipated Reimbursement - 237,585 

$1,257,092 
Unexpended Balance (1972) 137 

$1,256,955 
Surplus - 22,955 

Net Operating Assessment $1,234,000 



II. CAPITAL 

Capital Payment $1,300,000 

Interest Payment 542,250 

Total Capital Budget $1,842,250 

Anticipated Reimbursement 1,103,135 

$ 739,115 

Surplus 60,115 

Net Capital Assessment $ 679,000 

Total Assessment $1,913,000 



186 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Grades 9-12 High School Enrollments of Pupils Residing in and 
Receiving Education at Respective Towns' Expense as of October 1, 1973 
and Assessments to Each Member Town for 1974-75. 



Town Pupils % Operating + Capital = Share 

(Debt & Int.) (Assessment) 



Lexington 


2,934 


19.4112 J 


J 239,534 


$ 131,802 


$ 371,336 


Arlington 


2,761 


18.2666 


225,410 


124,030 


349,440 


Belmont 


1,628 


10.7708 


132,912 


73,134 


206,046 


Sudbury 


1,521 


10.0629 


124,176 


68,327 


192,503 


Acton 


1,476 


9.7651 


120,501 


66,305 


186,806 


Concord 


1,451 


9.5997 


118,460 


65,182 


183,642 


Way land 


1,275 


8.4353 


104,092 


57,276 


161,368 


Weston 


940 


6.2190 


76,743 


42,227 


118,970 


Lincoln 


388 


2.5670 


31,677 


17,430 


49,107 


Stow 


356 


2.3552 


29,064 


15,992 


45,056 


Carlisle 


252 


1.6672 


20,573 


11,320 


31,893 


Boxborough 


133 


.8799 


10,858 


5,975 


16,833 



Totals 15,115 100.0000 $1,234,000 $ 679,000 $1,913,000 



187 



VITAL STATISTICS 



33 births, 55 marriages and 30 deaths have been recorded during the 
year 1974, as follows: 



BIRTHS 



Date of 






Birth 


13 


Name of Child 


Jan. 


William Lambert Hamilton 


Jan. 


16 


Daniel Simon Stanzler 


Jan. 


31 


Doria Allegra Phelps 


Feb. 


11 


Alexandra Jane O'Neill 
Griffith 


Feb. 


21 


Thomas Adam Herman 


Feb. 


26 


Robert Lawrence Norton 


March 


13 


Michelle Ann Buonopane 


March 


30 


Eric Forbes Paxman 


April 


4 


Jenny Felicia Elkus 


April 


26 


Ethan Colgate Rossiter 


April 


30 


Nathaniel White Farny 


May 


17 


Anthony Ammendolia, Jr. 


June 


25 


John Bellingham Weir, II 


June 


27 


Lynn Catherine Fraser 


June 


29 


Justine Francoise Delori 


July 


25 


John Pocock Tytus 


July 


29 


Amelia Endicott Shevenell 


July 


30 


Nicole Leela Gulati 


Aug. 


28 


Donald Dwight Douty, Jr. 


Aug. 


31 


Michael Andrew Onigman 


Sept. 


3 


Melissa Noelle Ritchie 


Sept. 


14 


Jack Duncan Merry 


Sept. 


18 


Jacob Samuel Stam 


Sept. 


18 


James DeNormandie 


Sept. 


19 


Evan John Comjean 


Oct. 


12 


Kerri Lee Warren 


Oct. 


12 


Robyn Erica Art 


Oct. 


19 


Paul Koumantzelis 


Oct. 


19 


Elizabeth Koumantzelis 


Nov. 


7 


Meghan Gill Barry 


Nov. 


11 


Andrew Louis Stevenson 


Nov. 


13 


Anya Elizabetta Gurski 


Nov. 


16 


Kiril Andrei Dubrovsky 



Names of Parents 



William L. § Lisa J. Hamilton 
Alan L. § Margaret A. Stanzler 
Roger D. & Diane B. Phelps 
William J. $ Patricia J. Griffith 

Peter P. $ Mary G. Herman 
Thomas F. £ Linda E. Norton 
Paul J. § Mary M. Buonopane 
John M. $ Susan Paxman 
Howard F. § Lorna W. Elkus 
Walter A. & Selina R. Rossiter 
Michael H. $ Ethel R. Farny 
Anthony § Meredith Ammendolia 
John E. & Margaret M. Weir 
Donald C. § Joanne Fraser 
Francois C. S Rosamond C. Delori 
William B. § Ann B. Tytus 
John P. $ Lucy S. Shevenell 
Ravinder § Janet L. Gulati 
Donald D. $ Cheryl A. Douty 
Marc P. § Maureen Onigman 
James R. $ Nancy M. Ritchie 
Glenn W. § Susan L. Merry 
Allan C, Jr. $ Kathleen R. Stam 
Robert L. $ Eliana L. DeNormandie 
Bruce P. S Marlies I. Comjean 
Bruce F. § Darlene M. Warren 
Robert J. § Suzanne B. Art 
Arthur G. § Vaia I. Koumantzelis 
Arthur G. £ Vaia I. Koumantzelis 
Jon T. § Barbara A. Barry 
Howard H. § Sarah A. Stevenson 
Richard J. & Harriett A. Gurski 
Andrew S. § Katherine R. Dubrovsky 



188 



MARRIAGES 



Date of 
Marriage 

Jan. 19 



Names 



Charles F. York 
Jennifer A. Kano 



Residence 



Bourne , Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Jan. 


19 


Feb. 


16 


March 


2 


April 


6 


April 


20 


April 


20 


May 


4 


May 


5 


May 


5 


May 


12 


May 


18 


May 


19 



May 26 



June 



James William Kincaid 
Dana Marion Haden 

Jeffrey B. Henderson 
Wendy L. Winship 

William G. Workman 
Madora F. Waldman 

Richard J. Panetta 
Ellen A. Dowey 

Edward Andrew Bucher 
Gail Joanne Phillips 

Peter R. Schildbach 
Kathy D. Stone 

Joseph D. Gentile 
Susan Riessle 

Lyn C. Hovey 
Michelle Lamarre 

Donald Barry Verger 
Sandra Bisbee Warner 

James Louis Sardonis, Jr. 
Dianne Lee Burt 

Paul F. Tuohey 
Linda E. Chellis 

John F. Wilfert 
Judith Susan Beatteay 

Robert Jacob Isler 
Susan Todd Luccock 

Barry D. Copp 
Monica King Wollmar 



Northfield, Mass. 
Northfield, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Boston, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 

Lincoln , Mass. 
Sudbury, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Belmont, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Rowley, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Concord, Mass. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 

W. Acton, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Acton, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Concord, Mass. 

New York, N. Y. 
Wellesley, Mass. 

Boston ,Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



June 8 



Stanley Richard Ott 
Judith Daniels 



Lansing, N. Y. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



189 



June 8 Christopher McAdams Brown 
Kimberly Taylor Peach 

June 15 Keith Benjamin Josephson 
Marcia Williams Kaufman 

June 15 John S. Clary 
Donna M. Young 

June 16 Dennis Marc Baer 

Christine Marie Salvatore 

June 21 George Edwin Troutman 

Katherine Johanna Bunker 

June 22 Brooke A. Miller 

Anita L. Fernandes 

June 22 David Thayer Harney 

Jessie Bowen Brainerd 

June 23 Donald Dwight Douty 
Cheryl Ann Rando 

June 28 Lawrence D. Haworth 

Carolyn J. (Cannon) Smith 

July 6 Thomas Sotomayor 
Wendy Pantoja 

July 20 Bruce Elliot Sebell 

Jeanne Marie Fradette 

July 21 Guillermo E. Bahamon 
Claire G. Chafee 

Aug. 3 Herbert Carlton Heidt 
Eliza McClennen 

Aug. 17 Richard Mark Eskin 
Janet Carol Gary 

Aug. 18 Anthony W. Diluzio 
Harriet Jean Golden 

Aug. 23 Hart Goldsmith 
Susan Walker 

Aug. 23 Donald Dean Yarbro, Jr. 
Susan Jo Morris 

Aug. 27 Bruno R. Nesto 
Barbara Cronin 



Wellesley, Mass. 
Wellesley, Mass. 

Brooklyn Heights, N, 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Troy, Kansas 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Evanston, 111. 
Evanston, 111. 

Bedford, Mass. 
Holland, Texas 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Medway, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Wellesley, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Framingham, Mass. 

Bronx, N. Y. 
Bronx, N. Y. 

Lexington, Mass. 
Lexington, Mass. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Somerville, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Rockland, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Longmeadow, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lunenburg, Mass. 

Abilene, Texas 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 



190 






Sept . 3 

Sept . 6 

Sept. 7 

Sept. 7 

Sept. 14 

Sept. 14 

Sept. 21 

Sept . 24 

Oct. 3 

Oct. 3 

Oct. 5 

Oct. 5 

Oct. 12 

Oct. 13 

Oct. 18 

Oct. 26 

Oct. 26 

Nov. 2 



Carroll E. Dolan 
Kathleen Beach Hunter 

Joseph F. Malloy, Jr. 
Robin Holly Chipman 

Robert Bruce Nelson 
Patricia Johnstone 

James Johnston Rattray, Jr. 
Cicely Way d'Autremont 

Robert Palmgren 
Holly Wright 

David Theodore Van Zanten 
Ann Radford Lorenz 

Peter James Berlandi 
Marilyn June Wood 

Neal Thomas Dwyer 
Andrea Louise Doherty 

Ron Price 
Sally Lunn 

Robert John Cox 
Martha Glenn Miller 

Anthony Miles 

Rev an Huntington Fisher 

William Gordon Constable 
Katharine Munro Preston 

James Robert Dennis 
Dorothy Catherine Bronson 

David A. Foster 
Peggy-Anne Deschenes 

Thomas E. Williams 
Suzanne Claire Duval 

Charles E. Monty , Jr. 
Susan H. Henderson 

William H. Drury, III 
Elaine Rae Tuttle 

Bradley Wins low Barker 
Margaret Lee Godshalk 



Woburn, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Waltham, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Denver, Colo. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Weston, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Plymouth, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

W. Newton, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Venice, Calif. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Evansville, Ind. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Newton, Mass. 
Newton, Mass. 

Manchester, N. H. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Nantucket , Mass . 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Holliston, Mass. 
Marblehead, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Dover, N. H. 

East Holden, Maine 
East Holden, Maine 

Hardwick, Vt. 
Hard wick, Vt. 

Watertown, Mass. 
Watertown, Mass. 



191 



Nov. 30 Hendrick J. Slaats 

Christine J. Vercollone 

Dec. 7 7 P. Stephen Edgar 
Arlene Hanson 

Dec. 21 James Edward Hurst 
Lisa Jane Lustwerk 



Attleboro, Mass, 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Concord, Mass. 
Concord, Mass. 

Tucson, Ariz. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



DEATHS 



Date 


of 


Death 




1973 




Oct. 


9 


1974 




Jan. 


9 


Jan. 


12 


Feb. 


3 


Feb. 


26 


Mar. 


15 


Mar. 


30 


Apr. 


4 


Apr. 


12 


Apr. 


18 


Apr. 


18 


Apr. 


24 


Apr. 


26 


Apr. 


27 


Apr. 


28 


June 


26 


July 


3 



Age 



Name 



Douglas Russell Miller 



Years Months Days 



17 



William Haughey 


58 


-- 


-- 


Ralston Blackburn Smyth 


78 


-- 


-- 


William McKennan 


65 


6 


25 


Sister Stephanie (Ruth Frances 
Cook) 


69 


3 


23 


John H. Coane, Jr. 


76 


2 


11 


Annie Kizer 


83 


8 


14 


James V. Lennon 


60 


-- 


— 


Hugh Philip Simms 


54 


10 


19 


William Henry Davis 


91 


11 


27 


Edith (Stephenson) Garrison 


95 


7 


4 


Helena S. (Smith) Fennessy 


87 


— 


-- 


Ramona (Whittier) Calkins 


88 


6 


19 


Katherine (Fitzgerald) Hanlon 


78 


-- 


-- 


Randolph K. Foreman 


56 


6 


21 


Stamatia Lingos 


73 


-- 


-- 


Richard Bruce King, Jr. 


42 


8 


8 


192 









Date 


of 


Death 




July 


23 


Aug. 


5 


Aug. 


16 


Aug. 


23 


Sept. 


9 


Sept. 


18 


Oct. 


1 


Oct. 


15 


Oct. 


18 


Nov. 


1 


Nov. 


3 


Nov. 


25 


Nov. 


27 



Age 






Name 

Mary Ethel (Perry) Silva 

Elizabeth Fay Burns 

Sophie Tschessno Braude 

Robert A. Sabbag 

Louis C. Farley, Jr. 

Mattie (Mazzeo) Domenichella 

Reynold S. Bowles 

Elsie W. (Prime) Johnson 

Catherine (Gehring) Brodbeck 

Charles Parrish Coleman 

Helen C. Flynn 

Thomas J . Hannon 

Ruth E. (Wolfe) Farrell 



Years 


Months 


Days 


75 


-- 


-- 


51 


9 


10 


82 


1 





13 


10 


3 


61 


-- 


-- 


71 


- 


-- 


72 


4 


27 


77 


10 


9 


91 


7 


7 


41 


10 


29 


92 





9 


45 


-- 


-- 


60 


5 


21 



193 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Abbott, John A. § Diana B. 
Abco Realty Trust 
Ackley, Wallace E. & Ethel G. 
Adams, John $ Patricia § Adams, 

Peter $ Sharon K. P. 
Adams, John Quincy 
Adams, John Quincy $ Lucy D. 
Adams, Margaret E. 
Adams, Ramelle C. 
Adams, Thomas B. 

Adamson, William M. § Barbara M. 
Adler, Harold 5 Ivy Ruth 
Adler, Ivy Ruth 
Algeo, Leo J. § Elaine T. 
Algonquin Gas Transmission Co. 
Allen, Richard A. § Petronella R. M. 
Allen, Robert L. $ Carol E. 
Allison, William S. 5 Caroline P. 
Althansen, Alex F. § Emily D. L. 
American Tel. § Tel. Company 
Ammen, David L. § Judith B. 
Andersen, Grace A. 
Anderson, Carl L. § Dorothy A. 
Anderson, Lawrence B. § Rosina DuP. 
Anderson, Mildred D. $ Ronald F. 
Andrews, Francis S. § Dorothy W. 
Angell, Craig W. £ Carolyn G. 
Aprille, Thomas J. $ Amelia J. 
Archebald, Ralph 
Armstrong, C. Robert 
Armstrong, John L. 
Art, Robert J. £ Suzanne 
Atchley, Dana W. , Jr. 
Atchley, Dana W. , Jr. £ Barbara S. P. 
Atchley, Nan 

Austin, Richard C. £ Marcia W. 
Avery, Abigail D. 
Avery, Susan R. 



;s, Arthur, Jr. § Marion S. 
Bailey, Richard B. $ Rebecca B. 
Bailey, Richard B. 
Bair, Medill § Sophia 
Baird, Gordon P. § Sarah F. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 34,400 


$ 2,125.92 




20,900 


1,291.62 




100 


6.18 




68,100 


4,208.58 


600 




37.08 




155,400 


9,603.72 




29,600 


1,829.28 




79,500 


4,913.10 


150 




9.27 




34,300 


2,119.74 




67,500 


4,171.50 




300 


18.54 




26,400 


1,631.52 


63,300 




3,911.94 




16,200 


1,001.16 




33,600 


2,076.48 




43,300 


2,675.94 




5,400 


333.72 


69,700 


7,500 


4,770.96 




53,400 


3,300.12 




121,200 


7,490.16 




31,100 


1,921.98 




49,800 


3,077.64 




21,500 


1,328.70 




66,400 


4,103.52 




56,300 


3,479.34 




13,300 


821.94 


150 




9.27 




46,700 


2,886.06 




82,800 


5,117.04 




23,600 


1,458.48 


100 




6.18 




43,800 


2,706.84 


250 




15.45 




56,100 


3,466.98 




35,400 


2,187.72 


150 




9.27 




30,000 


1,854.00 




58,200 


3,596.76 




700 


43.26 




20,400 


1,260.72 




53,800 


3,324.84 



194 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Baldwin, Herbert L. £ Beatrice A. 

Baldwin, Robert 

Baldwin, Robert H. 5 Susan E. 

Baldwin, Roger P. £ Mary L. S. 

Ballou, Mildred A. 

Balogh, Karoly $ Judith 

Banks, Ann 5 Ridgeway M. 

Banks, Talcott M. 

Barbarow, Ruth 

Barber, John W. , Jr. $ Mary E. 

Barbera, Anthony A. § Eleanor E. 

Bardsley, Theodore J. § Doris A. 

Bare, Bruce M. & Helen S. 

Barkas, Christopher W. § Mary Ann 

Barker, William R. § Barbara S. 

Barnaby, John M. $ Charlotte B. 

Barnes, Benjamin A. § Ann B. 

Barnet, James R. § Jane A. 

Barr, Edgar E. 5 Olive H. 

Barry, John T. S Barbara M. 

Barthel, Walter 

Bartlett, James R. § Regine A. 

Basile, Angelo $ Catherine 

Bassett, Kenneth F. $ Caroline 

Batter, John F. § Rosemary A. 

Beach, Judith C. 

Beal, Bruce A. $ Enid L. 

Beal, Thomas P., Jr. $ Barbara B. 

Beaton, Daniel R. $ Shirley G. 

Beenhouwer, Owen § Lillemor 

Belanger, Michael P. S Gisa E. 

Belanger, Walter E. & Mary F. 

Bell, C. Gordon $ Gwendolyn K. 

Bell, Donald G., Jr. 

Bell, Roger A. 

Belle, Gene § Irene 

Bellizia, Francis E. § Mary H. 

Benedek, George 

Bennett, Doris E. 

Bent ley, Barbara Hyde 

Bent ley, Robert P. 

Bent ley, Robert P. & Joyce S. 

Berenson, Sheldon J. § Carol H. 

Bergen, Kenneth W. £ Emily F. 

Berger, Ralph § Carol H. 

Berman, Donald S. $ Edith M. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 38,300 


$ 2,366.94 


100 




6.18 




79,000 


4,882.20 




37,600 


2,323.68 




12,300 


760.14 




45,100 


2,787.18 




33,400 


2,064.12 




179,400 


11,086.92 




9,200 


568.56 




21,500 


1,328.70 




33,800 


2,088.84 




15,900 


•982.62 




38,100 


2,354.58 




28,500 


1,761.30 




19,200 


1,186.56 




41,200 


2,546.16 




40,900 


2,527.62 




88,000 


5,438.40 




34,100 


2,107.38 




53,800 


3,324.84 




23,500 


1,452.30 




35,000 


2,163.00 




43,700 


2,700.66 




19,700 


1,217.46 




37,100 


2,292.78 




23,300 


1,439.94 




75,900 


4,690.62 




71,700 


4,431.06 




22,300 


1,378.14 




2,900 


179.22 




14,700 


908.46 




28,700 


1,773.66 




29,000 


1,792.20 


4,700 




290.46 




22,500 


1,390.50 




27,000 


1,668.60 




27,500 


1,699.50 


100 




6.18 




21,200 


1,310.16 




11,200 


692.16 




7,000 


432.60 




45,300 


2,799.54 




4,300 


265.74 




72,400 


4,474.32 




39,600 


2,447.28 




21,300 


1,316.34 






195 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 




Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


Bernard, Clark L. § Susana R. 


$ 




$ 18,900 


$ 1,168.02 


Bertolami, Leo 






22,600 


1,396.68 


Bibring, George L. § Marcia G. 






26,600 


1,643.88 


Bikales, Norman S Ann B. 






57,100 


3,528.78 


Billings, Bruce H. § Sarah W. 






3,700 


228.66 


Birkett, James D. § Sarah P. 






18,400 


1,137.12 


Birmingham, James G. £ Carolyn 






52,000 


3,213.60 


Bisbee, Marie E. 






19,500 


1,205.10 


Bjork, Albion P. & Elizabeth 






39,900 


2,465.82 


Black, Everett A. £ Anne E. 






101,800 


6,291.24 


Blanchard, Charles E. § Eilene 






18,100 


1,118.58 


Blood, David W. § Iva D. 






21,500 


1,328.70 


Bobbitt, Lake H. $ Sarah G. 






26,400 


1,631.52 


Boccadoro, Joseph § Ida 






1,100 


67.98 


Bockoven, John S. 




100 




6.18 


Bockoven, John S. $ Dorothy R. 






22,700 


1,402.86 


Bodkin, John F. § Marilyn Kay 






29,600 


1,829.28 


Boersner, Wolfram A. § Doris M. 






36,100 


2,230.98 


Bogner, Walter F. 






35,400 


2,187.72 


Bolt, Richard H. § Katherine L. 






56,600 


3,497.88 


Bomengen, Allen § Ethel A. 






16,300 


1,007.34 


Bonaceto, Grace 






25,800 


1,594.44 


Bond, Roger B. § Elizabeth C. 






28,100 


1,736.58 


Bonia, Walter J. 






27,100 


1,674.78 


Booth, Alice Burrage 






2,700 


166.86 


Booth, Robert H. 






63,400 


3,918.12 


Boquist, Wallace P. 






69,000 


4,264.20 


Boston £ Maine Railroad 






2,200 


135.96 


Boston Edison Company 


2,040 


,000 


3,200 


126,269.76 


Bower, Joseph L. § Nancy M. 






51,000 


3,151.80 


Boston Gas Company 


490 


,000 




30,282.00 


Bowles, Clifford 






24 ,700 


1,526.46 


Bowman, Edward F. § Doreen W. 






22,800 


1,409.04 


Bowman, William A. § Zenta E. 






28,600 


1,767.48 


Boyce, Manley B. § Alice M. 






28,300 


1,748.94 


Boyce, Mary M. 






28,600 


1,767.48 


Boyce, James B. § Manley B. , II 






12,900 


797.22 


Boyer, Edward 






98,700 


6,099.66 


Boyer, Edward § Donnelly, Roberta 






23,700 


1,464.66 


Boyer, John H. 






48,100 


2,972.58 


Boyer, Louis L. § Elaine T. 






20,500 


1,266.90 


Boyer, Markley H. $ Julie M. 






102,500 


6,334.50 


Bradburn, James R. § King T. 






21,500 


1,328.70 


Bradford, Robert L. 6 Muriel H. 






18,600 


1,149.48 



196 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Bradlee, Henry G., Ill, $ Sandra N. 

Bradley, Clifford $ Jeannette E. 

Brain, J. Walter $ Patricia L. 

Brannen, Robert C. § Barbara A. 

Braude, Stephen E. d, Bettie J. 

Braun, Morton B. § Esther K. 

Brennan, William L. $ Eleanor A. 

Brewster, Ellen Beebe 

Briggs, Susan L. 

Bromberg, Nathan S. § Selma 

Bronson, Franklin C. § Catherine M. 

Brooks, Paul 

Browne, Secor D. § Mary D. 

Brown, Elizabeth G. 

Brown, John B. § Ann P. 

Brown, Penny 

Brown, Robert P. § Jeane Hunter, Trs. 

Brown, Robert W. $ Lee G. 

Brownell, Robert G. 

Brownell, Robert G. $ Ruth M. 

Bruce, Ann 

Bruce, James A. § Maureen F. 

Bucci, Frank P. § Arlene M. 

Buchan, William R. § Barbara C. 

Bucher, Edward A. $ Gail J. Phillips 

Buckler, Sheldon A. £ Marilyn L. 

Buerger, Martin J. § Li la 

Bullard, John A., Jr. § Margaret 

Van D. 
Buonopane, Paul J. § Mary 
Burckett, Douglas M. £ Phillippa C. 
Burk, George W. $ Ruth M. 
Burke, Ruth Bemis 
Burke, Walter J., Jr. $ Helen M. 
Burnham, Robert Boit 
Burns, Melvin P. $ Elizabeth F. 
Burroughs, June M. 
Burt, William F. $ Donna G. 
Burton, Priscilla M. 
Butler, William B. $ Mary Jane 
Butts, Louise M. 



Calkins, 
Calkins 



Charles W. 
Charles W. 



Jr. 

Jr. § Martha A. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 45,400 


S 2,805.72 




10,600 


655.08 




17,000 


1,050.60 




23,700 


1,464.66 




78,200 


4,832.76 




35,400 


2,187.72 




21,300 


1,316.34 




200 


12.36 




6,100 


376.98 




5,700 


352.26 




27,100 


1,674.78 




54,600 


3,374.28 




31,300 


1,934.34 




55,400 


3,423.72 




22,900 


1,415.22 


100 




6.18 




22,400 


1,384.32 




10,700 


648.90 


150 




9.27 




58,600 


3,621.48 


150 




9.27 




11,400 


704.52 




46,300 


2,861.34 




21,700 


1,341.06 




27,400 


1,693.32 




39,800 


2,459.64 




42,400 


2,620.32 




33,800 


2,088.84 




15,900 


982.62 




35,500 


2,193.90 




19,900 


1,229.82 




48,000 


2,966.40 




39,700 


2,453.46 




34,500 


2,132.10 




19,300 


1,192.74 




23,800 


1,470.84 




37,300 


2,305.14 




42,200 


2,607.96 




25,200 


1,557.36 




56,700 


3,504.06 


5,700 




352.26 




36,500 


2,255.70 



197 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Callahan, Helen T. 
Campobasso, Anthony B. § Dorothy M. 
Campobasso, Joseph R. § Mary Anne 
Cannon, Ellen DeN. £ Bradford 
Cantella, Anthony J. 5 Brianne B. 
Cantlin, John H. & Antoinette T. 
Caplan, Robert H., Ill, § Norma 
Caras, Byron § Anastasia 
Caras, Ophair § Florence L. 
Car ley, John A. S Joan K. 
Carlson, Christopher T. 5 Jane F. 
Carman, John W. § Eleanor T. 
Carr Realty Trust 
Carroll, Marjory M. 
Carroll, Richard P. & Nancy A. 
The Carroll School 
Carstensen, Warren & Evelyn G. 
Carter, John H. 
Casilio, Frank G. 
Caskey, Walter H. S Anna H. 
Cassidy, Henry J. § Verna E. 
Cassidy, Robert E. £ Isabelle 
Cassidy, Verna E. 
Caswell, John Ross § Carol B. 
Chamberlain § Murray 
Champeny, John C. § Leona G. 
Chapin, Louise B. & Bertha L. 
Chapin, Margaret E. 
Chapman, Emily M. & Est. of James S. 
Chase, Barbara S. 
Chellis, Herbert N. § Eleanor M. 
Cherniack, Jerome R. S Elizabeth E. 
Chiotelis, Charles L. & Iasme J. 
Chereau, Alexandra 
Chipman, Robert H. £ Mary F. 
Chisholm, Edward C. & Margaret F. 
Chou, Harry H. S. § Lily 
Chu, Chauncey C. 
Chu, Ge Yao § Wei Ying 
Church, Robert T. $ Priscilla S. 
Ciampi, Emilio £ Mary P. 
Cibel, Stanley A. $ Thelma W. 
Ciraso, Amelia 

Clagett, Donald C. & Charlotte 
Hoi lister 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




% 4,500 


S 278.10 




16,700 


1,032.06 




17,900 


1,106.22 




172,500 


10,660.50 




5,900 


364.62 




66,100 


4,084.98 




53,300 


3,293.94 




39,700 


2,453.46 




21,000 


1,297.80 




40,700 


2,515.26 




30,600 


1,891.08 




38,200 


2,360.76 




87,700 


5,419.86 




18,300 


1,130.94 




36,400 


2,249.52 




42,800 


2,645.04 




58,900 


3,640.02 




76,900 


4,752.42 




17,900 


1,106.22 




54,600 


3,374.28 




700 


43.26 




19,500 


1,205.10 




14,600 


902.28 




36,600 


2,261.88 


1,500 




92.70 




54,600 


3,374.28 




55,300 


3,417.54 




18,100 


1,118.58 




17,100 


1,056.78 




52,100 


3,219.78 




17,200 


1,062.96 




24,500 


1,514.10 




66,200 


4,091.16 


150 




9.27 




20,000 


1,236.00 




21,300 


1,316.34 




38,700 


2,391.66 




36,700 


2,268.06 




56,600 


3,497.88 




43,200 


2,669.76 




24,900 


1,538.82 




24,200 


1,495.56 




23,700 


1,464.66 



25,100 



1,551.18 



198 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Clare, Mary E. 

Clark, Clifford A. 5 Patricia D. 

Clark, William T. $ Catharine T. 

Coan, Thomas § Catherine M. 

Coane, John H., Jr. 5 Amolia 

Coastal & Suburban Realty Trust 

Coburn, Arthur L., Ill, § Ann B. 

Coburn, Edward S. 

Coburn, Edward S. § Minnie E. 

Coffey, Wilma H. 

Coffin, Stewart T. $ Jane M. L. 

Cohen, Paul A. $ Jane M. 

Cole, Edwin M. § Lucy F. 

Cole, Hugh $ Nancy V. 

Coleman, Charles P. § Mary Murray B. 

Co 11 ins,. Edward C, II, $ Susan P. 

Collins, Laurence A. § Janet S. 

Comer ford, John F. § Mary G. 

Comjean, Bruce P. & Marlies F. 

Comjean, Marc G. $ Judith K. 

Comstock, Charles B. § Joan M. 

Conant, Estate of Lily R. 

Cone, Thomas E., Jr. $ Barbara C. 

Conley, David P. 

Connair, John J. § Ferro, Jacqueline 

Connell, James J. $ Elizabeth J., Trs. 

Connolly, David 

Connolly, Evelyn $ Est. of J. Irving 

Conroy, Grace W. 

Constant ine, Katherine P. 

Cook, Harry $ Kathleen G. 

Cook, Jacqueline H. 

Coolidge, Henry P. § Alice C. 

Coons, Richard D. $ Nancy J. 

Cooper, Amiel G. $ Lorna 

Cooper, E. Crawley $ M. Jane 

Cope, Oliver & Alice DeN. 

Cope, Thomas Pym § Elizabeth W. 

Cope land, Robert C. $ Ruth R. 



Corcoran, Robert P, 
Cormack, Allan M. 
Corrigan, Leo W. 
Corrigan, Mary K. 
Corrigan, Mary 
Cotoia, Anthony J. 



$ Elizabeth D. 



$ Lucy M. A. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 21,700 


S 1,341.06 




47,200 


2,916.96 




37,500 


2,317.50 




15,000 


927.00 




12,700 


784.86 




4,000 


247.20 




40,100 


2,478.18 




500 


30.90 




30,800 


1,903.44 




16,700 


1,032.06 




24,800 


l y 532.64 




55,500 


3,429.90 




40,300 


2,490.54 




30,400 


1,878.72 




34,900 


2,156.82 




38,200 


2,360.76 




32,800 


2,027.04 




51,300 


3,170.34 




41,800 


2,583.24 




35,900 


2,218.62 




26,800 


1,656.24 




52,800 


3,263.04 




42,800 


2,645.04 




17,100 


1,056.78 




20,700 


1,279.26 




14,000 


865.20 




600 


37.08 




31,200 


1,928.16 




17,700 


1,093.86 




24,300 


1,501.74 




23,600 


1,458.48 




20,300 


1,254.54 




52,800 


3,263.04 




56,700 


3,504.06 




44,200 


2,731.56 




43,200 


2,669.76 




12,700 


784.86 




30,900 


1,909.62 




58,000 


3,584.40 




40,700 


2,515.26 




3,800 


234.84 




12,400 


766.32 




10,800 


667.44 




34,000 


2,101.20 




39,900 


2,465.82 



199 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Cotoia, Anthony J. § Lucy M., Trs. 

Cotoia, Lucy Mary Anne 

Cotoni, Joseph 

Courtney, Joseph D. § Elaine H. 

Cousins, Ashley B. 

Cousins, Jeanne B. § Est. of Lawrence 

Cowles, Addison § Alexandra C. 

Cramer, Stuart C. £ Leona 

Crandall, Stephen H. $ Patricia E. 

Crawford, John D. § Joanna W. 

Crook, Constance S. 

Crooks, Naomi Ann 

Culver, Perry J. 5 Kate S. 

Cummings, William R. § Palma M. 

Cunningham, J. Lewis § Ruth P. 

Cunningham, Robert Allen & Margaret 

Cunningham, Robert M. $ Claire 

Cutter, Robert A. 



Dadmun, Harrie H. $ Helen 

Dahl, Thyra 

D'Alleva, Carmine 

Dalli, Francis J. $ Mary E. 

Dallos, Andras $ Zsuzsanna 

Dalrymple, Chester $ Jean 

Dalrymple, Sidney C. § Dorothy C. 

Damico, Louise 

Danfon, J. Gilbert $ Priscilla A. 

Benjamin 

Benjamin $ Alexandra C. 

Roger 

Roger § Lydia H. 

Bruce G. $ Janet B. 
Edward A. $ Mary C. 



Dane, 

Dane, 

Dane, 

Dane, 

Daniels, 

Danosky, 

Darling, Eugene M., Jr. 

Darling, 0. Leonard § Barbara M. 

D'Arrigo Brothers Co. of Mass. 

d'Autremont, Chester 

d'Autremont, Chester C. $ Ruth W. 

Davidson, Robert W. § Cynthia A. 

Davies, Huw § Jessie L. 

Davis, Ethel B. 

Davis, Prescott L. 

Davis, Ronald 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 600 


$ 37.08 




28,700 


1,773.66 




23,900 


1,477.02 




19,400 


1,198.92 




11,500 


710.70 




28,100 


1,736.58 




20,900 


1,291.62 




100 


6.18 




45,100 


2,787.18 




35,800 


2,212.44 




18,100 


1,118.58 




28,800 


1,779.84 




71,800 


4,437.24 




26,200 


1,619.16 




21,200 


1,310.16 




36,900 


2,280.42 




23,600 


1,458.48 




41,800 


2,583.24 




44,300 


2,737.74 




21,100 


1,303.98 


1,300 




80.34 




64,700 


3,998.46 




19,500 


1,205.10 




53,900 


3,331.02 




44,900 


2,774.82 




23,200 


1,433.76 




25,200 


1,557.36 


300 




18.54 




68,400 


4,227.12 


100 




6.18 




99,500 


6,149.10 




56,500 


3,491.70 




28,700 


1,773.66 




30,500 


1,884.90 




35,400 


2,187.72 




11,500 


710.70 


250 




15.45 




74,400 


4,597.92 




12,500 


772.50 




15,100 


933.18 




19,600 


1,211.28 




82,700 


5,110.86 


150 




9.27 



200 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Davis, Ronald C. $ Barbara C. 
Davis, Sherman P. 
Davis, Sherman P. 5 Phyllis 
Davis, William H. 
Davison, Alice P. 
Davy, Edgar W. § Louise W. 
Dawes, Donald L. § Ruth K. 
Dean, Emma W. 

Dean, William M. & Lorraine 
DeBaryshe, Paul P T Louise 
DeCilio, Frank W. $ Josephine R. 
Dee, Helena A. 

DeFord, William, Jr. § Kathryn W. 
John 5 Geneva Ann 

Louis G. £ Anne M. 

Francois C. & Rosamond P. 

Rosamond P. 



100 



M. 



C. 



DeJesus 
deLone, 
Delori, 
Delori, 

James A. 
Demone, Harold 
Denehy, 
Denholm 



§ Putnam, 



W. $ Elsie R. 
Edward J. $ Bernadetta J. 
A. Stuart § Jane Leslie 
Denison, Mary Smith 
DeNormandie, James 
DeNormandie, James, Executor 
DeNormandie, James $ Martha 
Derbyshire, S. Howe $ Helen L. 
desCognets, Archer 
desCognets, Archer B. £ Gwendolyn G, 
Desmond, Kenneth 

Desmond, Kenneth A. £ Catherine A. 
DeVito, Mario A. § Edith C. 
Dewey, Edward S. & Laurie T. 
Dewey, Edward & Zella 
Dexter, Barbara C. 
Diab, Thomas A. 
Dickey, Dana H. § Emy P. 
Dickie, Richard I. $ Julia G. 
DiGiovanni, Guy P. § Teresa E. 
Diminico, Louis § Antonetta 
Dixon, Milburn J., Trustee 
Dixon, Russell J. § Theresa J. 
Doherty, Elizabeth H. 
Doherty, Marjorie 
Doherty' s Garage, Inc. 
Doherty, William R. S Phyllis M. 



150 
250 



1,000 



$ 21,600 

18,000 
18,500 
50,100 
28,200 
28,600 
15,300 
21,000 
27,600 
23,300 
18,700 
26,900 
27,500 
33,400 
32,600 

800 
26,800 
45,900 
43,400 
55,900 
49,500 
30,700 
127,800 

100 

52,200 

23,300 
27,400 
54,300 
31,500 
62,300 
106,400 
19,300 
21,900 
25,700 
48,600 
2,100 
26,100 
44,900 
16,400 
55,400 
22,100 



$ 1,334.88 
6.18 
1,112.40 
1,143.30 
3,096.18 
1,742.76 
1,767.48 
945.54 
1,297.80 
1,705.68 
1,439.94 
1,155.66 
1,662.42 
1,699.50 
2,064.12 
2,014.68 

49.44 
1,656.24 
2,836.62 
2,682.12 
3,454.62 
3,059.10 
1,897.26 
7,898.04 
6.18 
9.27 
3,225.96 
15.45 
1,439.94 
1,693.32 
3,355.74 
1,946.70 
3,850.14 
6,575.52 
1,192.74 
1,353.42 
1,588.26 
3,003.48 
129.78 
1,612.98 
2,774.82 
1,013.52 
3,485.52 
1,365.78 



201 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Domenichella, Domenic 
Domenichella, Mattie M. 
Domenichella, Frank A., Jr. 
Donald, David Herbert § Aida D. 
Donaldson, Charlotte L. 
Donaldson, David M. £ Lynn B. 
Donaldson, Donald P. 
Donaldson, Gordon A. 
Donaldson, Gordon A. 5 Elizabeth A. 
Donaldson, Malcolm L. 
Donaldson, Robert D., Jr., Adm. 
Donneil, Samuel H. § Marion L. 
Donovan, Donna M. 
Donovan, Leo A. § Elinor C. 
Dooley, Thomas J., Jr. § Helen 
Dorian, Newart § Paul J. 
Dougherty, Allen R. $ Helen M. 
Doughty, Joseph M. 
Dowling, John E. § 
Downey, Edward F., 
Downing, Grace L. 



Susan K. 

Jr. & Elizabeth F. 



Cathy J. 
Norma June 
i Sara M. 
G armory, 



i Shirley D. 
Olive S. 



Doyle, Charles E. 
Doyle, Richard F. 
Drago, Nicholas V, 
Drake, Lillian W. 

Bertha V. 
Drew, Frederic T. 
DuBois, Anson M. I 
Duborg, George F. 

Duffy, James E., Ill, § Barbara G, 
Dunne, {Catherine D. G. 
Durnan, John P. § Leona E. 
Dust in, Daniel E. $ Rachel S. 



East, Edla 

Easterday, Charles L. $ Helen B. 

Eaton, Richard J. 

Eckhardt, Homer D. 

Edmonds, Dean S., Jr. § Louise W. 

Ehrenfeld, John R. 

Elder, George D. & 

Elias, Eugene H. & Gail G, 

Elkus, Howard F. § Lorna 

Elliott, Ethel M. 



$ Myrna G. 
Diana H. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax. on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 2,600 


$ 160.68 




19,600 


1,211.28 


250 




15.45 




33,800 


2,088.84 




6,000 


370.80 




24,500 


1,514.10 




86,000 


5,314.80 


300 


53,000 


3,293.94 




41,700 


2,577.06 




68,100 


4,208.58 




10,200 


630.36 




39,500 


2,441.10 




26,400 


1,631.52 




63,500 


3,924.30 




36,200 


2,237.16 




16,900 


1,044.42 




14,800 


914.64 


100 


18,500 


1,149.48 




37,300 


2,305.14 




19,100 


1,180.38 




16,600 


1,025.88 




20,700 


1,279.26 




56,500 


3,491.70 




44,900 


2,774.82 




17,800 


1,100.04 




12,900 


797.22 




18,800 


1,161.84 




38,200 


2,360.76 




46,300 


2,861.34 




50,500 


3,120.90 




23,600 


1,458.48 




25,900 


1,600.62 




21,000 


1,297.80 




48,900 


3,022.02 




25,200 


1,557.36 




28,100 


1,736.58 




74,200 


4,585.56 




41,500 


2,564.70 




30,500 


1,884.90 




21,400 


1,322.52 




43,100 


2,663.58 




28,400 


1,755.12 



202 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Elliott, William G. § Peggy P. 
Ellis, Alexander, Jr. § Nancy B. 
Ellis, Eloise G. 
Elwood, David M. $ Carol Jean 
Emerson, Claire G. 
Emery, Mary B. 

Emery, Richard B. § Alice W. 
Emmons, A. Bradlee $ Judith Reed 
England, Albert E. G Priscilla S. 
Eppling, Frederic J. $ -Sarah J. 
Ericson, Herbert E. 5 Erlyne R. 
Eshleman, Dean B. 
Evangelista, Florenzo T. 
Evangelista, Florenzo T. $ Dorothy L. 
Evans, Lewis M. § Mary Lou 
Evans, Lucius W. $ Cynthia F. 
Ewen, Frederick G. § Anita 



Faddoul, George P. § Natalie A. 
Fairbanks, Alan R. $ Diane A. 
Faran, James J. & Ellen G. 
Fargo, Foster M., Jr. $ Susan C. 
Farley, Louis C, Jr. £ Isabel K. 
Farley, Susan 

Farny, Michael H.'§ Ethel H. 
Farrar Village Conservation Trust, 

Trustees of 
Farrar Pond Village, Trustees of 
Farrell, Philip J. $ Ruth E. 
Faunce, Anthony 
Faunce, Mary Gill § Anthony 
Feinberg, Bernice 
Feldman, Roger D. $ Deborah W. 
Felegian, Peter $ Marion 0. 
Felsenthal, Peter § Susan M. 
Fenijn, Chris J. $ Yvonne 
Fennessy, Helena S. 
Ferguson, Charles E. & Phyllis G. 
Fernald, George H., Jr. $ Eleanor T. 
Ferri, Edward J. & Eleanor J. 
Finnerty, James J. $ Anna C. 
Fiorelli, Ernest R. & Rose M. 
Fish, Robert & Faye L. 
Fisher, John W. 
Fitts, Gertrude W. S Est. of Charles 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 62,300 


$ 3,850.14 




59,400 


3,670.92 




53,800 


3,324.84 




23,600 


1,458.48 




20,600 


1,273.08 




29,600 


1,829.28 




27,100 


1,674.78 




50,500 


3,120.90 




54,200 


3,349.56 




22,600 


1,396.68 




31,100 


1,921.98 




13,600 


840.48 


150 




9.27 




17,800 


1,100.04 




25,200 


1,557.36 




71,300 


4,406.34 




55,700 


3,442.26 




26,000 


1,606.80 




100 


6.18 




39,800 


2,459.64 




22,900 


1,415.22 




28,400 


1,755.12 


100 




6.18 




16,800 


1,038.24 




20,000 


1,236.00 




398,600 


24,633.48 




28,600 


1,767.48 


150 




9.27 




49,700 


3,071.46 




3,900 


241.02 




33,700 


2,082.66 




30,900 


1,909.62 




30,900 


1,909.62 




29,400 


1,816.92 




29,600 


1,829.28 




25,100 


1,551.18 




67,600 


4,177.68 




2,700 


166.86 




21,300 


1,316.34 




30,600 


1,891.08 




62,800 


3,881.04 




36,100 


2,230.98 




61,100 


3,775.98 



203 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



§ Eleanor M, 
$ Thelma C. 



£ Harriet E, 
§ Louise H. 



Fitzgerald, Derek J, 

Fitzgerald, John H. 

Flannery, Constance H. 

Flannery, Donald J. 

Flannery, Donald J. 

Flansburgh, Earl R. 

Fleck, James D. £ Margaret E. 

Fleming, Clifford D. $ E. Frances 

Fleming, William H. $ Patricia H. 

Flint, Edward F. $ Henry R. 

Flint, Edward W. , Executor 

Flint, Edward Whitney 

Flint, George B. $ Lucie S. 

Flint, Peter § Janet B. 

Flint, Robert M. $ Linda C. 

Flint, Warren F. 

Floyd, Olive B. 

Flynn, Helen C. § Ireland, Helen T. 

Foley, Harold W. 

Forbes, Sherman H. § Annabel Otis 

Ford, David, II, § Mary Gillingham 

Foster, J. Edward § Sara M. 

Francis, June M. B. 

Frank, Robert C. & Velma S. 

Franklin, J. Thomas § Susan B. 

Fraser, Donald C. § Joanne 

Fraser, Robert M. $ Donna A. 

Freed, Charles 5 Florence W. 

French, John B. § Deborah C. 

Friel, Patrick J. $ Charlotte A. 

Frost, Wesley T. & October C. 

Frullo, Frank 

Fullerton, Albert L. , Jr. & Mary S. 

Fusillo, Michael G. $ Concetta G. 



Gagne, Lawrence E. § Dorothy Q. 
Gajewski, Ceslaus A. § Sophie 
Gallitano, Alphonse L. § Eleanor M 
Gargill, Robert M. $ Marian Lynn 
L. § Alice E. 
S. 

J. § Barbara F. 
i Nancy M. 



Garrison, David 

Garrison, Edith 

Garrison, John 1 

Garth, John C. I 

Gary, Maida E. 

Gatchell, G. Gordon, Jr. $ Esther A. 

Gavitt, A. David § Dorothy C. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 24,300 


$ 1,501.74 




27,600 


1,705.68 




31,100 


1,921.98 


100 




6.18 




12,200 


753.96 




41,500 


2,564.70 




8,900 


550.02 




24,700 


1,526.46 




49,100 


3,034.38 




52,200 


3,225.96 




5,300 


327.54 




6,500 


401.70 




19,500 


1,205.10 




22,200 


1,371.96 




100 


6.18 


450 


69,700 


4,335.27 




26,800 


1,656.24 




26,600 


1,643.88 




40,700 


2,515.26 




30,500 


1,884.90 




51,500 


3,182.70 




30,500 


1,884.90 


150 




9.27 




57,600 


3,559.68 




44,200 


2,731.56 




24,600 


1,520.28 




24,100 


1,489.38 




33,600 


2,076.48 




59,000 


3,646.20 




54,500 


3,368.10 




21,100 


1,303.98 


400 




24.72 




37,300 


2,305.14 




55,000 


3,399.00 




36,600 


2,261.88 




23,100 


1,427.58 




38,000 


2,348.40 




38,200 


2,360.76 




27,000 


1,668.60 




31,600 


1,952.88 




41,900 


2,589.42 




24,100 


1,489.38 




25,900 


1,600.62 




21,600 


1,334.88 




400 


24.72 



204 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Gentile, Joseph F. § Kathleen E. 
Gerson, Nathaniel C. § Sareen R. 
Gheith, Mohamed A. £ Dorothy A. 
Giese, Paul E. § Lucretia H. 
Gilbert, Francis 
Gilbert, John W. § Josephine L. 
Gilfoy, Donald A. § Helen B. 
Gillis, John G. § Maria F. 
Giurleo, James M. § Mary C. 
Glass, John 

Gl-ass, John B. § Florence M. 
Gleason, Nancy W. J. 
Gounaris, Thomas X. $ Jean G. 
Grabill, Elliott V. $ Martha L. 
Grady, John K. § Elizabeth S. 
Graf, Malcolm 

Grande, Orlando S. $ Rose P. 
Gras, Ranulf W. $ Annette E. 
Grason, Rufus L. § Edna B. 
Gray, Dorothy G., Extrx. 
Gray, Eugene 

Greaves, Allan W. § Theresa D. 
Green, Jonathan W. § Louise L. 
Green, Robert T. d, Catherine M. 
Greenberger, Joel S. § Martha S. 
Gregg, Earl F. $ Doris H. 
Gregory, Mary 
Griffith, Patricia J. 
Griggs, Thomas I., Jr. 
Grim, William M., Jr. § Barbara M. 
Grinnell, William L. 8, Virginia B. 
Gropius, Use § Est. of Walter 
Gross, Thomas A, 0. $ Judith C. F. 
Grover, C. Stuart § Gunilda G. 
Guarino, Guy E. § Frances I. 
Gulati, Ravi § Janet 
Gunaris, Theodore § Rheta D. 
Gurski, Richard J. $ Harriett A. 
Gustafson, Craig S. § Louise M. 
Gustafson, J. Kenneth § Janet L. 
Guthke, Karl S. $ Dagmar C. 
Guy, Donald C. § M. Cynthia 
Gyftopoulos, Elias P. $ Artemis E. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 23,500 


$ 1,452.30 




34,600 


2,138.28 




20,200 


1,248.36 




19,500 


1,205.10 




14,400 


889.92 




14,000 


865.20 




35,200 


2,175.36 




45,500 


2,811.90 




1,200 


74.16 


300 




18.54 




31,000 


1,915.80 




46,800 


2,892.24 




23,700 


1,464.66 




52,600 


3,250.68 




18,400 


1,137.12 




14,300 


883.74 




51,400 


3,176.52 




32,900 


2,033.22 




34,000 


2,101.20 




40,200 


2,484.36 




18,100 


1,118.58 




16,600 


1,025.88 




20,400 


1,260.72 




63,200 


3,905.76 




30,000 


1,854.00 




34,900 


2,156.82 


400 




24.72 




54,600 


3,374.28 




40,200 


2,484.36 




22,100 


1,365.78 




34,300 


2,119.74 




51,300 


3,170.34 




35,700 


2,206.26 




30,300 


1,872.54 




45,900 


2,836.62 




24,600 


1,520.28 




16,500 


1,019.70 




46,100 


2,848.98 




35,000 


2,163.00 




17,000 


1,050.60 




29,600 


1,829.28 




40,600 


2,509.08 




6,700 


414.06 



205 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Haartz, John C, Jr. S Beatrice R. 
Had ley, Henry H. $ Janna P. 
Haessler, Herbert A. § Diane F. 
Hagenian, Joseph C. $ Irene R. 
Haggerty, John S. S Nancy L. 
Hagmann, Otto d, Katherine E. 
Hagopian, Richard G. § Helen 
Hall, Peter A. 5 Mollie Forbes 
Hamilton, Harry A. § Bessie E. 
Hamilton, William L. § Lisa P. 
Hammond, John S. & Nancy C. 
Hancock, John C. 
Hankey, Francis W. $ Edna J. 
Hanlon, Est. of Catherine L. 
Hanson, Adler M. £ Madeline A. 
Hapgood, Norman, Jr. § Ruth K. 
Hardy, Harriet L. § Stewart, Jane H. 
Harned, Faye 

Harney, Gregory G. § Anne W. 
Haroian, Henry & Jessie S. 
Haroutunian, Harry J. § Anita G. 
Harrington, Clifford F., Jr. § 

Winthrop W., Jr. 
Harrington, Nancy 
Harrington, Winthrop W. , Jr. 
Harris, Melvyn H. & Nancy M. 
Harris, Roger W. § Evelyn A. 
Harrison, Henry F. 
Harrison, Henry F. duP. & 

Elizabeth H. 
Harvey, Harriet R. 
Harwood, Reed 

Hatsopoulos, George N. & Daphne 
Haughey, William J. 5 Sylvia M. 
Hawes, Donald 0. $ Lillian B. 
Hawkinson, Lowell B. & Suzanne 
Haworth, George G. $ Thelma E. 
Haytayan, Harry M. § Katherine J. 
H. B. Knowles, Inc. 
Healy, Edward M. g Helen T. 
Healey, Harry R. , Jr. $ Jeanne C. 
Heart, Frank E. $ Jane S. 
Heartt, Charlotte B. 
Heck, Mary Higbee 
Heijn, Cornelius, Jr. § Marion 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




S 42,000 


$ 2,595.60 




35,100 


2,169.18 




50,200 


3,102.36 




19,100 


1,180.38 




30,000 


1,854.00 




31,600 


1,952.88 




24,300 


1,501.74 




52,500 


3,244.50 




16,900 


1,044.42 




16,600 


1,025.88 




50,400 


3,114.72 




8,000 


494.40 




43,600 


2,694.48 




16,900 


1,044.42 




29,300 


1,810.74 




21,300 


1,316.34 




26,400 


1,631.52 


150 




9.27 




56,800 


3,510.24 




27,100 


1,674.78 




13,600 


840.48 




12,300 


760.14 




2,200 


135.96 


5,300 


74,200 


4,913.10 




40,700 


2,515.26 




16,400 


1,013.52 


150 




9.27 




64,900 


4,010.82 




15,800 


976.44 




60,800 


3,757.44 




121,300 


7,496.34 




42,800 


2,645.04 




32,500 


2,008.50 




27,200 


1,680.96 




29,900 


1,847.82 




22,600 


1,396.68 


9,400 


60,800 


4,338.36 




27,600 


1,705.68 




23,800 


1,470.84 




32,200 


1,989.96 




36,000 


2,224.80 




100,900 


6,235.62 




24,100 


1,489.38 



206 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Helburn, Peter 
Helburn, Peter $ Margaret 
Hemry, Leslie P. § Mary Jane 
Henderson, Barclay G. A. 
Henderson, Robert S. 
Henderson, Robert S. § Carolyn H. 
Hendrickson, Robert A. 5 Ruth Ann 
Henebry, Carolyn L. 
Herlin, Melvin A. § Eugenia T. 
Henry, Richard 
Herman, Peter P. $ Mary G. 
Herman, William F. 
Herschbach, Dudley R. £ Georgene B. 
Herthel, Stephen W. $ Evelyn S. 
Hester, Leon B. $ Mary B. 
Hewitt, Elizabeth C. $ George C. 
Hibben, George C. $ Julia K. 
Higgins, William M., Ill 
Hill, Craig C. £ Heather D. 
Hill, H. Jay S Joan R. 
Hill, Jacques A. F. § Helen S. 
Hinds, Edward H. & Edith M. 
Hoar, George W. $ Dorothy S. $ 
Hoar, Norman W. £ Shirley E. 
Hoben, Allan $ Susan J. 
Hoch, Carole K. 
Hoch, Reimar H. H. 
Holbrow, Frederick § Florence G. 
Holland, Frederick C. § Martha A. 
Holland, Peter A. & Marjo'rie L. 
Holland, Taffy K. 

Hollingsworth, Lowell M. $ Florence S. 
Hollister, Walter M. $ J. Sally 
Home National Bank of Brockton, Tr. 
Hoover, Henry B. § Lucretia J. 
Horn, Michael C. § Helen C. 
Home, Benjamin § Jean Y. 
Horwitz, Murray § Patricia F. 
Hosey, John E. § Margaret L. 



Est. of John J, 
Ruth B. 



Houghton, Lillian 

Housman, Frank M. 

Howard, Elizabeth F. 

Howard, Joseph W. 

Howard, Joseph W. $ Sally E. 

Hubbard, Eliot, Jr. 

Hughes, Robert J. $ Vera E. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


300 


$ 


$ 18.54 




44,300 


2,737.74 




5,300 


327.54 




10,900 


673.62 


150 


1,300 


89.61 




33,100 


2,045.58 




20,400 


1,260.72 




59,000 


3,646.20 




37,000 


2,286.60 


50 




3.09 




20,200 


1,248.36 




51,800 


3,201.24 




42,200 


2,607.96 




60,100 


3,714.18 




41,700 


2,577.06 




46,400 


2,867.52 




43,800 


2,706.84 




18,200 


1,124.76 




56,100 


3,466.98 




56,800 


3,510.24 




49,500 


3,059.10 




80,900 


4,999.62 




30,700 


1,897.26 




24,000 


1,483.20 




18,100 


1,118.58 




15,000 


927.00 




17,400 


1,075.32 




49,600 


3,065.28 




22,400 


1,384.32 




27,600 


1,705.68 




45,400 


2,805.72 




28,000 


1,730.40 




27,900 


1,724.22 




35,400 


2,187.72 




34,800 


2,150.64 




55,800 


3,448.44 




39,000 


2,410.20 




17,100 


1,056.78 




14,600 


902.28 




58,700 


3,627.66 




8,000 


494.40 


300 




18.54 




40,000 


2,472.00 




47,300 


2,923.14 




41,500 


2,564.70 



207 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Hunsaker, Jerome C, Jr. 

Hunt, Merrill T. 

Hunter, J. Samuel § Susan C. 

Huntley, Lottie D. 

Huntley, Medford E. $ Blanche L. 

Hurd, Joseph F., Trustee, Jo-Nell 

Realty 
Hurd, Nancy Dabney 
Hurff, Joseph L. $ Elizabeth C. 
Hutchinson, James A., Jr. 
Hyde, Benjamin D. § Mildred B. 



Ide, Kenton J. $ Christel 
Iliescu, Nicolae § Esther 
Ingard, K. Uno $ Doris C. 
Irwin, Mary M. 
Ives, David 0. £ Cecilia van H. 



Jackson, Gardner, Jr. $ Sallie 

Jackson, Huson § Polly F. 

Jacob, Fred d, Eva 

Jacobs, S. Ralph § Frances L. 

Jagger, James M. § Miriam H. 

James, Hamilton R. £ Waleska E. 

Janes, G. Sargent S, Ann B. 

Jeffrey, Joseph H. £ Louise A. 

Jenal, Robert L. $ Irene D. 

Jenney, Charles J. £ Katrina C. 

Jennings, Charles E. $ Ann V. 

Jensen, Holgar J. § Grace A. 

Jerodel Realty Trust 

Jevon, Robert W. § Virginia B. 

Jewett, Julie Davis 

John, DeWitt £ Morley M. 

Johnson, Albert D. 

Johnson, Ernest L. 

Johnson, Ernest L. $ Grace M. 

Johnson, H. W. § M. Jeannine 

Johnson, Kenneth A. § Gladys 

Johnson, Sandra Ann 

John Swanson Realty Corporation 

Jozwicki, Alfons § Adeline C. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 90,500 


$ 5,592.90 




17,800 


1,100.04 




44,400 


2,743.92 




17,000 


1,050.60 




16,700 


1,032.06 




50,900 


3,145.62 




43,200 


2,669.76 




31,800 


1,965.24 




22,900 


1,415.22 




36,900 


2,280.42 




22,600 


1,396.68 




33,200 


2,051.76 




37,900 


2,342.22 




40,800 


2,521.44 




33,100 


2,045.58 




25,300 


1,563.54 




54,600 


3,374.28 




32,100 


1,983.78 




75,400 


4,659.72 




38,300 


2,366.94 




66,600 


4,115.88 




37,400 


2,311.32 




23,900 


1,477.02 




50,800 


3,139.44 




28,600 


1,767.48 




33,600 


2,076.48 




17,600 


1,087.68 




63,200 


3,905.76 




33,800 


2,088.84 




41,000 


2,533.80 




35,000 


2,163.00 




11,400 


704.52 




34,100 


2,107.38 




42,300 


2,614.14 




53,000 


3,275.40 




32,200 


1,989.96 




65,200 


4,029.36 




48,200 


2,978.76 




19,200 


1,186.56 



208 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Kahn, Martin H. $ Susan B. 

Kamborian, Jacob S., Jr. $ Nancy M. 

Kameny, Stuart M. $ Wendy W. 

Kano, Cyrus H. § Dorothy 

Kaplan, Leonard J. § Pearl B. 

Kasperian, Karl D. § Carol 0. 

Kassner, Michael A. $ Patricia A. 

Kaufman, Marcia W. 

Kaye, Harold $ Alice S. 

Keay, Donald P. § Mary Ann L. 

Keevil, Charles S., Jr. 

Keevil, Charles S., Jr. & Hannah M. 

Keily, Delbar P. $ Gertrude E. 

Kelleher, Robert J. § Katherine J. 

Kelleher, Thomas E. 

Ke liner, Joan 

Kellogg, Celina Robbins 

Kellogg, Harold F. 

Kennedy, Albert E. 

Kennedy, John T. 

Kennedy Land Corporation 

Kerrebrock, Jack L. § Bernice M. 

Kessel, Joseph B. $ Lesley J. 

Ketchum, Anne C. 

Ketteringham, John M. § Susan M. 

Keuper, Charles S. 

Keuper, Charles S. S Elinore W. 

Keyes, Janet T. 

Kim, Samuel H. $ Barbara M. 

Kindleberger, Charles P. $ Sarah M. 

King, R. Bruce, Jr. § Eleanor T. 

King, William A. § Elizabeth P. 

King, William Tappan § Jeanne M. 

Kirby, Gerard L. 

Kistiakowsky, Irma E. 

Kirkpatrick, Margaret M. 

Kitchen, Ernest W. $ Elsie W. 

Kitses, Steven J. $ Mary H. 

Kjellander, Mary C. 

Kling, John W. $ Louise H. 

Klobuchar, John A. $ N. Maribeth 

Knoop, Christopher 

Knoop, Christopher B. § Jan M. 

Knowlton, Esther Grace 

Koehler, Edward F. $ Margaret M. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 45,700 


$ 2,824.26 




94,300 


5,827.74 




36,000 


2,224.80 




27,800 


1,718.04 




23,400 


1,446.12 




70,600 


4,363.08 




18,400 


1,137.12 




35,600 


2,200.08 




25,400 


1,569.72 




36,300 


2,243.34 


2,950 




182.31 




37,200 


2,298.96 




17,600 


1,087.68 




40,400 


2,496.72 




16,100 


994.98 




14,300 


883.74 




101,100 


6,247.98 


200 




12.36 




3,800 


234.84 


300 




18.54 




65,400 


4,041.72 




42,600 


2,632.68 




30,400 


1,878.72 




31,400 


1,940.52 




20,200 


1,248.36 


220 




13.59 




74,300 


4,591.74 




24,700 


1,526.46 




39,400 


2,434.92 




33,400 


2,064.12 




32,600 


2,014.68 




19,200 


1,186.56 




72,700 


4,492.86 




22,000 


1,359.60 




46,600 


2,879.88 




34,900 


2,156.82 




54,300 


3,355.74 




55,100 


3,405.18 




30,600 


1,891.08 




24,400 


1,507.92 




29,200 


1,804.56 


150 




9.27 




17,000 


1,050.60 




18,100 


1,118.58 




31,300 


1,934.34 



209 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Kolligian, Gregory S. 5 Zoe 
Kolodny, Myer Z. $ M. Lillian 
Koopman, Bernard 0. $ Jane B. 
Korhonen, Edwin J. § Miriam 
Kornfeld, George R. £ Hulen S. 
Koumantzelis, Arthur G. § Vaia T. 
Kramer, Manuel & Ruth L. 
Kruse, Jurgen M. $ Alice S. 
Kubik, Charles S. 5 Emily K. 
Kuhns, Roger J. § Roberta B. 
Kusleika, Steven $ Louise C. 



Lahey, Heirs of James 

LaFaille, Ronald 

Lahnstein, Richard K. 

Landry, Christopher K. $ G. Barrie 

Lane, J. Frank § Kathleen F. 

Lang, Richard E. & Betty Lee 

Langdon, Haven W. 

Langton, William G. § Jane G. 

Lankhorst, Bernice C. $ Greeley, 

James M. 
Lankhorst, Beverly P. 
Larson, John B. § Mafalda M. 
Larson, Robert C. 
Laurence, Kenneth 
Laverty, Charles § 
Lavine, Jerome M. 
Lavrakas, Apostle § Fofo 
Law, John H. § Nancy F. 
Lawrence, David B. $ Priscilla M. 
Lawrence, Lincoln C. $ Blanche P. 
Lawson, Harold E. 
Lawson, Harold E. 
Lawson, John R. & 
Lay, Kenneth W. £ 
Lawson, Rebecca 
Lazaridis, Lazarus J. 
Leape, Martha P. 
Leathern, Evelyn K. 
Leaver, Robert 0. $ Barbara S. 
Lee, Paul H. § Frances Sue 
Lee, Richard S. 
Lee, Shih Ying § May C. 



$ Betty F. 

S Lynda Wilson 

Lillian L. 
$ Mary C. 



§ Wanda E. 
Rebecca S. 
Virginia A, 



§ Suzanne 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 86,800 


$ 5,364.24 




31,400 


1,940.52 




26,700 


1,650.06 




22,500 


1,390.50 




22,800 


1,409.04 




57,200 


3,534.96 




35,100 


2,169.18 




22,800 


1,409.04 




33,100 


2,045.58 




49,200 


3,040.56 




23,600 


1,458.48 




5,400 


333.72 


450 




27.81 




14,800 


914.64 




40,400 


2,496.72 




56,300 


3,479.34 




44,900 


2,774.82 




22,500 


1,390.50 




43,400 


2,682.12 




26,700 


1,650.06 




26,200 


1,619.16 




23,800 


1,470.84 




29,500 


1,823.10 




22,300 


1,378.14 




46,200 


2,855.16 




29,800 


1,841.64 




10,700 


661.26 




18,900 


1,168.02 




25,900 


1,600.62 




18,800 


1,161.84 


1,350 




83.43 




34,800 


2,150.64 




36,300 


2,243.34 




4,000 


247.20 


200 




12.36 




36,100 


2,230.98 




37,500 


2,317.50 




4,200 


259.56 




37,800 


2,336.04 




2,800 


173.04 




27,200 


1,680.96 




43,600 


2,694.48 



210 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Lee, Thomas H. § Barbara F. 

LeGates, John 

Leger, Mary E., Trustee 

Leggat, Thomas E. § Barbara B. 

Lemander, William C. § Emily K. 

Lemire, Robert A. § Virginia M. 

Lenington, Robert L. § Carolyn J. 

Lennon, James V. § El in 

Leshick, Joseph J. $ Margaret F. 

Leslie, Paul M. § Elizabeth M. 

Levey, Harold A., Jr. 

Levey, Harold A., Jr. $ Ruth P. 

Levi, Nancy 

Levin, Alvin 

Levin, Alvin 5 Betty 

Lewis Street Realty Trust 

Li, Yao T. $ Nancy T. 

Liddick, Harold S. £ Virginia D. 

Liepins, Atis A. £ Diana 

Light, Galen D., Jr. $ Lois McClure 

Lightbody, John W. , Sr. £ Muriel G. 

Lincoln Auto Service, Inc. 

Lincoln Beauty Salon 

Lincoln Old Town Hall Corporation 

Lincoln Plumbing § Heating 

Lindsay, Franklin A. § Margot C. 

Lingos, John G., Stamatia £ George 

Linnell, Zenos M. 5 Geraldine H. 

Linnell, Zenos M. $ Kathleen G. 

Linnell, Zenos M. § Kathleen G., 
Stanley, Francis E. § Suzanne R. I 
Caswell, John Ross $ Carol B. 

Linstrom, Peter J. £ Maybelle L. 

Lin-Way Realty Trust 

Lippman, Anne F. § Richard J., Trs. 

Litte, Rudolph 

Little, John D. C. $ Elizabeth A. 

Lo, Steven Shih Ting $ Yi-Chao M. 

Lockwood, Dunbar, Jr. § Irene P. 

Loewenstein, Paul § Sophie 

Lombardo, Philip 

Loud, John F. $ Mary L. 

Loud, Robert L. $ Gwyneth E. 

Ludden, John M. $ Susan F. 

Lunn, Paul W. $ Rose F. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 26,700 


$ 1,650.06 


150 




9.27 




20,600 


1,273.08 




50,300 


3,108.54 




41,700 


2,577.06 




36,500 


2,255.70 




26,200 


1,619.16 




27,300 


1,687.14 




41,000 


2,533.80 




15,700 


970.26 


100 




6.18 




25,700 


1,588.26 


300 




18.54 


475 




29.36 




42,800 


2,645.04 




66,700 


4,122.06 




49,600 


3,065.28 




24,500 


1,514.10 




37,500 


2,317.50 




27,400 


1,693.32 




33,100 


2,045.58 


1,000 




61.80 


1,550 




95.79 




11,700 


723.06 


750 




46.35 




89,600 


5,537.28 




35,400 


2,187.72 




29,300 


1,810.74 




50,900 


3,145.62 




500 


30.90 




23,300 


1,439.94 




31,900 


1,971.42 




23,500 


1,452.30 




34,600 


2,138.28 




31,900 


1,971.42 




21,200 


1,310.16 




55,700 


3,442.26 




33,500 


2,070.30 


100 




6.18 




49,400 


3,052.92 




16,100 


994.98 




36,500 


2,255.70 




20,400 


1,260.72 



211 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Lustwerk, Ferdinand £ Ingeborg J. 
Lutnicki, Victor A. § Harriet H. 
Lyon, Ruth 



$ 29,300 $ 1,810.74 
52,400 3,238.32 
16,900 1,044.42 



MacDiarmid, John A. § Marion M. 

Maclnnis, Daniel A., Jr. $ Frances M. 

Mackenzie, Ethel L. 

MacKenzie, Murdock J. § Adeline A. 

Maclaurin, Elfriede 

Maclaurin, Ellen 

Mac Lean, H. Arnold § Corinne C. 

MacLeod, Estate of Edward § Hester M, 

MacLeod, Edward, Jr. £ Mary M. 

MacLeod, Josephine F. 

MacMahon, D'Arcy G. $ Lucia T. 

MacNeil, Ronald L. $ Wendy Snyder 

Madio, Frederick R. $ Alice 

Mahan, Russell P. § Anastasia 

Maher, Howard 

Mahoney, Gerald J. § Jeanne M. 

Mahoney, John D. § Eleanor D. 

Maier, Emanuel $ Sylvia 

Malloy, David C. 

Malloy, Matthew J. $ lone W. 

Malloy, Robert M. 

Malloy, Robert M., Jr. § Carol E. 

Malloy, Terese A. 

Maloney, Richard G., Trustee of 

Round Hill Trust 
Manion, David R. $ Noel L. 
Mannar ino, Joseph & Florence A. 
Manning, Catherine L. 
Mansfield, James S. $ Sarah C. 
Manzelli, Donald M. $ Janet G. 
Manzelli, John & Dorothy 
Manzer, Deward F. § Virginia 
Mar, James W. S Edith 
Marchal, Jessie 
Marcks, Ronald H. 5 Barbara W. 
Marden, John A. R., et als, Trs. 
Maroni, Jacques R. 
Marsh, Paul E. 

Marsh, Paul E. & Margaret B. 
Martin, Robert T. § Margaret M. 
Martini, William F. $ Virginia J. 



150 



150 



40,800 
24,700 
36,300 
22,900 
47,600 
34., 000 
27,200 
17,200 
10,000 
16,000 
61,300 
16,000 
21,500 
55,400 
16,200 
23,800 
39,600 
41,700 
13,300 
2,700 
69,300 
22,000 
13,600 

64,700 
30,400 
15,700 
16,700 
34,000 
55,100 
20,100 
37,000 
28,200 

39,600 

1,400 

44,700 

45,200 
29,800 
29,500 



2,521.44 

1,526.46 

2,243.34 

1,415.22 

2,941.68 

2,101.20 

1,680.96 

1,062.96 

618.00 

988.80 

3,788.34 

988.80 

1,328.70 

3,423.72 

1,001.16 

1,470.84 

2,447.28 

2,577.06 

821.94 

166.86 

4,282.74 

1,359.60 

840.48 

3,998.46 
1,878.72 
970.26 
1,032.06 
2,101.20 
3,405.18 
1,242.18 
2,286.60 
1,742.76 

9.27 

2,447.28 

86.52 

2,762.46 

9.27 
2,793.36 
1,841.64 
1,823.10 



212 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Mason, Hayden § Jean C. 
Mason, Max, Jr. § Betty M. 
Mason, Richard K. £ Ann E. 
Mason, William C. $ Virginia 
Massachusetts Audubon Society, Inc. 
Massachusetts Centers, Inc. 
Massachusetts Port Authority 
Mathieu, Alix & Pamela A. 
Maxwell, Ralph E. § Phyllis B. 
Mayfield, Glover B. $ Gale S. 
McCausland, Est. of Gordon C. $ 

Elizabeth C. 
McClennen, Alan § Louise H. 
McCune, William J. $ Elizabeth 
McCurdy, Michael C. $ Deborah L. 
McDonald, Robert 

McEneaney, Raymond J. £ Beverly M. 
McEnness, Harold F. 
McGarry, Anne W. 
McGrath, Mary F. 
McHugh, John E. 
Mclninch, Bill $ Bonnie June 
Mclnnis, Donald G. 
Mclntyre,. Adelbert § Constance 
McKennan, William S Alice W. 
McKnight, David B. § Ernest T. , d/b/a 

McKnight's Nursery § Landscape Service 
McKnight, David B. $ Eleanor J. 
McKnight, Katherine E. 
McLean, John L. § Ann A. 
McLellan, John W. & Julia C. 
McLeod, James $ Ethel B. 
McMahon, Howard § Lucile N. 
McNulty, Thomas F. $ Mary S. 
McPherson, William W. $ Kathryn L. 
McWade, Paul E. $ Lucille C. 
Meade, Edmund J. § Eleanor H. 
Mead, Varnum R. § Janice H. 
Mead, Varnum R. $ Thacher, Ralph, 

Trs. of the Tower Road Trust 
Mecsas, Michael E. $ Mary J. 
Meeks, M. Littleton £ Louise V. 
Meenan, Peter § Marion Morey 
Melanson, Leonard J. § Mary 
Meriam, Ellin F. 
Meriam, Richard S. § Alice G. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 22,800 


S 1,409.04 




27,600 


1,705.68 




21,800 


1,347.24 




39,900 


2,465.82 




69,400 


4,288.92 




388,800 


24,027.84 




83,900 


5,185.02 




37,700 


2,329.86 




39,900 


2,465.82 




42,600 


2,632.68 




28,200 


1,742.76 




57,900 


3,578.22 




49,200 


3,040.56 




25,600 


1,582.08 


300 




18.54 




17,000 


1,050.60 




5,700 


352.26 




45,500 


2,811.90 




43,200 


2,669.76 




6,700 


414.06 




34,700 


2,144.46 




3,800 


234.84 




28,600 


1,767.48 




38,800 


2,397.84 




4,700 


290.46 




19,700 


1,217.46 




18,300 


1,130.94 




18,500 


1,143.30 




14,300 


883.74 




9,300 


574.74 




99,500 


6,149.10 




65,600 


4,054.08 




35,900 


2,218.62 




44,700 


2,762.46 




15,300 


945.54 




24,700 


1,526.46 




21,000 


1,297.80 




36,300 


2,243.34 




35,500 


2,193.90 




29,200 


1,804.56 




15,800 


976.44 




25,900 


1,600.62 




6,300 


389.34 



213 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Merrill, Vincent N. S Anne S. 

Merry, Glen W. $ Susan B. 

Messina, Elena C. 

Messina, Est. of Jaspare § Grazia 

Meyer, James 

Meyer, James W. $ Carol H. 

Michener, Martin C. § Susanah H. 

Milender, Sumner N. § Edith M. 

Militzer, Martha Brown 

Millard, Donald A. § Jeannette D. 

Millard, Donald A., Jr. § Catherine C. 

Millard, John D. S Jane L. 

Millard, Susan § David K. 

T. & Marcheta A. 

F. G. £ Paula A. 



L. 



Miller, Harold 

Miller, Joseph 

Mintz, Norbett L. § Sophie B. 

Mix, Thomas R. f T Helen 

Mixon, Scatt I. § Isabel 

Mlavsky, Abraham I. $ Sally A. 

Mohr, John J. S Jean F. 

Moller, Cynthia 

Montgomery, Maurice M., Jr. § 

Florence Y. 
Moody, Charles P. § Josephine C. 
Moore, Murvale H., Jr. $ NeGarre H. 
Moore, Paul 

Moore, Robert L. § Dorothy H. 
Moor, Edgar J. § Joan R. 
Morency, Alfred J. $ Mary V. 
Morette, Walter J. § Gertrude C. 
Morey, Kenneth £ Ruth I. 
Morgan, Henry M. § Gwen G. 
Morris, Lloyd § Katherine 
Morris, Milliage E. § Beatrice M. 
Morrissey, J. Neil 
Morrissey, J. Neil § Mary F. 
Morse, Thomas R. 



Morse, William H 
Morse, William H 
Moss, Leonard G. 
Moss, Rodney E. I 
Mount, Wayne D. I 
Mozzi, Robert L. 
Mrakovich, David 
Mrugala, Anthony 
Mrugala, Frances 



$ Marguerite D. 

§ Patricia A. 
§ Frances S. 
I Elizabeth T. 
i Claire L. 
§ Ruth M. 
V. § Gertrude A. 
J. 
T. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 25,000 


$ 1,545.00 




58,000 


3,584.40 




49,200 


3,040.56 




22,900 


1,415.22 


60 




3.70 




34,600 


2,138.28 




10,100 


624.18 




47,900 


2,960.22 




11,300 


698.34 




59,300 


3,664.74 




73,300 


4,529.94 




36,800 


2,274.24 




42,800 


2,645.04 




48,100 


2,972.58 




32,700 


2,020.86 




42,800 


2,645.04 




33,900 


2,095.02 




29,900 


1,847.82 




60,600 


3,745.08 




100,000 


6,180.00 




17,200 


1,062.96 




16,500 


1,019.70 




27,800 


1,718.04 




31,800 


1,965.24 




100 


6.18 




26,500 


1,637.70 




47,600 


2,941.68 




54,500 


3,368.10 




33,700 


2,082.66 




16,800 


1,038.24 




43,000 


2,657.40 




21,200 


l,310.'l6 




10,300 


636.54 


500 




30.90 




21,500 


1,328.70 




38,100 


2,354.58 




20,400 


1,260.72 




26,600 


1,643.88 




25,800 


1,594.44 




17,300 


1,069.14 




30,600 


1,891.08 




35,700 


2,206.26 




34,500 


2,132.10 


300 


20,600 


1,291.62 




1,900 


117.42 



214 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Mueller, Robert K. & Jane K. 
Mukhitarian, Samuel § Stephanie 
Mullaney, Joseph E. S Rosemary W. 
Mulroy, Michael J. § Judith 
Munroe, William C, Jr. & Mary W. 
Murphy, Est. of Cyrus W. $ Persis 
Murphy, Daniel J. $ Louise C. 
Murphy, Edward W. 
Murphy, Frederick 
Murphy, Mary B. 
Murphy, Mina Dorothea 
Murphy, William F. § Ruth M. 
Murray, John B. § Sheila M. 
Mutschler, Louis H. $ Phyllis 
Myers, John A., Jr. $ Lucy B. 
Myles, Theresa Anne 5 J. Richard 



Naiman, Mark L. $ Adeline L. 

Najjar, Edward G. $ Gail T. 

Nardone, Anthony B. § Nancy E. 

Natoli, Donald J. $ Lois M. 

Nault, Wilson S. & Marjorie A. 

Nawoichik, Edmund P. £ Elsie I. 

Neely, Scott 

Neely, Scott § Joan H. 

Neiley, Alexander H. $ Diana B. 

Neily, Clark M. & Diane D. 

Nelson, Albert E. § Marjorie E. 

Nelson, Erik J. § Dorothy G. 

Nelson, Jean R. 

Nessen, E. Richard 

Nesto, Bruno R. $ Eugenia R. 

Neumann, Est. of Ernest P. $ Sylvia B. 

Newbold, Thomas 

Newcombe, Frances J., Trustee 

Newell, Lena M. 

New England Tel. $ Tel. Co. 

Newman, Philip § Elsa L. 

Newman, Robert B. $ Mary Shaw 

Newton, George C, Jr. 

Newton, Harland B. $ Ethel A. 

N. F. Brisson, Inc. 

Nichols, Judith A., Trustee 

Nickerson, Elizabeth Perkins 

Niles, John B. & Muriel L. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 54,700 


$ 3,380.46 




18,400 


1,137.12 




55,800 


3,448.44 




15,900 


982.62 




27,200 


1,680.96 




22,100 


1,365.78 




16,500 


1,019.70 




26,900 


1,662.42 


150 




9.27 




21,200 


1,310.16 




16,800 


1,038.24 




43,900 


2,713.02 




25,500 


1,575.90 




33,600 


2,076.48 




22,400 


1,384.32 




35,600 


2,200.08 




21,600 


1,334.88 




45,800 


2,830.44 




52,100 


3,219.78 




25,100 


1,551.18 




46,000 


2,842.80 




46,900 


2,898.42 


150 




9.27 




78,500 


4,851.30 




30,100 


1,860.18 




22,700 


1,402.86 




27,500 


1,699.50 




19,300 


1,192.74 




38,400 


2,373.12 




50,700 


3,133.26 




32,900 


2,033.22 




42,700 


2,638.86 




46,300 


2,861.34 




33,900 


2,095.02 




20,900 


1,291.62 


,198,500 




74,067.30 




29,900 


1,847.82 




150,000 


9,270.00 




33,800 


2,088.84 




28,900 


1,786.02 




27,800 


1,718.04 




17,900 


1,106.22 




55,800 


3,448.44 




25,400 


1,569.72 



215 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Niles, Robert L. & Virginia M. 
Nockles, William A. $ Diane F. 
Norton, Thomas F. § Linda E. 



Daniel F. 

Daniel F. $ Mary T. 

John H. 

John H. 



O'Brien, 

O'Brien, 

O'Brien, 

O'Brien, 

O'Brien, John H. & Barbara M. 

O'Brien, Joseph A. $ Virginia B. 

Ogden, David D. 

Ogden, David D. § Virginia L. 

Old County Realty Trust 

Olivieri, James £ Dorothy M. 

Olivo, Jean E. 

O'Loughlin, John 

O'Loughlin, John M. £ Joanne R. 

Olsen, Kenneth H. $ Elva-Liisa A. 

Olsen, Ralph § Marcia E. 

O'Neill, Edward J. $ Teresa 

Onigman, Marc P. § Maureen 

Order of Saint Anne 

O'Reilly, Joseph J. & Camilla M. 

Osborne, Gordon 

O'Rourke, Paul K. § Marilyn J. 

Outten, Henry P. § Nancy K. 

Owen, Carleton W. 

Owen, Charles J. § Mary Lee 



Paddock, Louis E. § Ann E. 

Page, Elizabeth J. 

Page, Elliott F. $ Emily R. 

Page, Lot B. & Patricia H. 

Page, Milton S. § Roberta M. 

Page, Stanley W. § Elisabeth H. 

Paglierani, Laurence A. § Pamela 

Paige, Richard B. § Elizabeth J. 

Paine, Albert S. $ Noelle W. 

Paine, Mary C. 

Paino, Dolores M. 

Paino, John F. 

Paino, John F. & Dolores M. 

Palmer, Attelio A. 5 Kathryne 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 27,600 


$ 1,705.68 




17,600 


1,087.68 




17,700 


1,093.86 


450 




27.81 




24,400 


1,507.92 




11,600 


716.88 


100 




6.18 




34,600 


2,138.28 




26,400 


1,631.52 


20 




1.24 




47,300 


2,923.14 




9,300 


574.74 




17,500 


1,081.50 




1,800 


111.24 


100 




6.18 




34,400 


2,125.92 




63,100 


3,899.58 




20,200 


1,248.36 




35,800 


2,212.44 




9,000 


556.20 




15,500 


957.90 




20,000 


1,236.00 




65,000 


4,017.00 




24,400 


1,507.92 




28,300 


1,748.94 




8,700 


537.66 




23,100 


1,427.58 




25,600 


1,582.08 




29,500 


1,823.10 




28,800 


1,779.84 




41,300 


2,552.34 




23,200 


1,433.76 




19,900 


1,229.82 




19,200 


1,186.56 




33,000 


2,039.40 




300 


18.54 




21,800 


1,347.24 




33,300 


2,057.94 




1,600 


98.88 




10,400 


642.72 




21,200 


1,310.16 



216 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Palmer, Eleanor M. 

Panetta, Frank § James 

Panetta, Frank S Theresa J. 

Panetta, James J. £ Rosemary D. 

Panetta, James J. 

Panetta, Mary N. 

Panetta, Salvatore & Rita 

Pantazelos, Peter G. $ Hytho H. 

Pappas, Mrs. Louis T. 

Paquette, Margaret 

Parish, Edward C, Jr. § Joan DeF. 

Parke, Nathan G., IV, $ Ann T. 

Parker, Jackson B. § Jacqueline S. 

Par la, John J. 

Parsons, W. Chester § Claire T. 

Parsons, Robert T. 

Pastoriza, James J. § Ruth B. 

Pattinson, Mary I. 

Paul, Lawrence 0. § Louise C. 

Payne, Roger S. § Katherine B. 

Payne, William T. 5 Mary H. 

Pearmain, W. Robert & Claire P. 

Peavy, Leopold, Jr. & Elizabeth J. 

Peck, Mildred E. 

Peirce, Isabel T. 

Peloquin, Roy J. 

Perera, Guido R., Jr. § Joan H. 

Perry, Richard § Nancy G. 

Pertzoff, Est. of Constantin A. § 

Olga 
Pertzoff, Olga 
Peterson, F. Wallace 
Peterson, Frank W. $ Mary E. 
Peterson, Mary E. 
Pettit, Robert L. & Julie P. 
Phillips, Charlotte T. 
Phinney, Jean R. 
Pianka, Walter E. § Ann C. 
Pickett, Robert C. § Annette M. 
Pickman, Anthony P. 
Pickman, Anthony § Alice L. 
Pierce, Charles Eliot § Dora R. 
Pike, John A. $ Mary S. 
Pino, Frank J. & Muriel E. 
Plant, Paul R. S Madeline Leonard 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 28,300 


S 1,748.94 




3,100 


191.58 




30,000 


1,854.00 




18,900 


1,168.02 


100 




6.18 




25,900 


1,600.62 




15,700 


970.26 




40,000 


2,472.00 


1,500 




92.70 




2,900 


179.22 




34,000 


2,101.20 




11,800 


729.24 




26,300 


1,625.34 




7,200 


444.96 




37,300 


2,305.14 


100 




6.18 




54,300 


3,355.74 




27,800 


1,718.04 




22,700 


1,402.86 




28,900 


1,786.02 




43,200 


2,669.76 




61,900 


3,825.42 




71,600 


4,424.88 




17,800 


1,100.04 




23,500 


1,452.30 




18,700 


1,155.66 




59,000 


3,646.20 




49,400 


3,052.92 




140,000 


8,652.00 




49,800 


3,077.64 


250 




15.45 




27,500 


1,699.50 




5,700 


352.26 




25,100 


1,551.18 




64,300 


3,973.74 




57,900 


3,578.22 




38,800 


2,397.84 




49,200 


3,040.56 


300 




18.54 




86,000 


5,314.80 




30,800 


1,903.44 




64,300 


3,973.74 




20,100 


1,242.18 




31,700 


1,959.06 



217 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Piatt, Anthony C. & Martha P. 
Plukas, John M. § Kathleen G. 
Podsen, Robert E. § Doris A. 
Polumbaum, Theodore S. & Nyna 
Porter, James F. § Marjorie F. 
Postel, Sholem $ Marie L. 
Poulos, Charles L. $ Sophie 
Powers, Francis L., Jr. $ Helen 
Pratt, Nancy A. 
Preston, Jean W. 
Priest, Anne P. 
Primak, John & Lena 
Puffer, Richard F 
Pugh, Alexander L 



Jr. & Margaret G. 
Ill, S Julia S. 



Quarton, Gardner S Frances 
Queener, Kim 



Radasch, Donald £ Margaret R. 
Ragan, Ralph R. 
Ragan, Ralph R. $ Ruth M. 
Raja, Roy M. $ Ellen A. 
Raker, Morris § Anne M. 
Rand, Lucy Kimball (Est. of) 
Rand, William M. £ Priscilla W. 
Rando, Thomas 

Ranney, Donald D. § Patricia A. 
Rapperport, Eugene J. § Lucy H. 
Rappoli, Arthur E. $ Dorothy H. 
Rasco, Austin § Diane L. 
Rawson, Edward B. & Nancy B. 
Reece, Richard C. £ Susan W. 
Reed, Abijah § Susan P. 
Reservoir Nursing Home, Inc. 
Resnick, Charles H. § Marie J. 
Rhedom Realty Corporation 
Rhodes, Timothy $ Janet 
Ricci, Louis, Fred $ Charles 
Rice, James F., Jr. § Barbara A 
Richardson, Frederick C. 
Riley, Allston § Marion H. 
Risch, Martin D. 
Ritchie, James R. 
Ritsher, John A. $ Cynthia W. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


S 


$ 29,000 


$ 1,792.20 




37,700 


2,329.86 




53,300 


3,293.94 




36,300 


2,243.34 




31,100 


1,921.98 




21,400 


1,322.52 




30,800 


1,903.44 




15,400 


951.72 




2,500 


154.50 




99,300 


6,136.74 




38,400 


2,373.12 




37,900 


2,342.22 




43,700 


2,700.66 




28,800 


1,779.84 




11,400 


704.52 


100 




6.18 




23,500 


1,452.30 




3,200 


197.76 




28,500 


1,761.30 




29,100 


1,798.38 




47,900 


2,960.22 




63,000 


3,893.40 




35,100 


2,169.18 




56,700 


3,504.06 




27,700 


1,711.86 




28,500 


1,761.30 




29,700 


1,835.46 




30,200 


1,866.36 




34,400 


2,125.92 




38,400 


2,373.12 




30,100 


1,860.18 




100 


6.18 




46,900 


2,898.42 




42,800 


2,645.04 




24,800 


1,532.64 




16,200 


1,001.16 




19,900 


1,229.82 




29,700 


1,835.46 




23,800 


1,470.84 




23,400 


1,446.12 




5,500 


339.90 




64,900 


4,010.82 



218 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Rizzo, William J., Jr. $ Jane L. 

Robbins, Bonita M. 

Robbins; Roland W. § Geraldine 

Roberts, Paul 0., Jr. § Martha Jean 

Roberts,- Richard I. 5 Shirley M. 

Robey, A. Alexander § Harriet S. 

Robichaud, George U. § Emma 

Robinson, Dora A. 

Rodday, A. N. 

Roehr, George L. § Marcia A. 

Rogers, Alfred P. S George E., Trs. 

Rogers, David E. 8, Susan B. 

Rogers, Harriet J. 

Rogers, Mabel le, Winifred $ Evelyn 

Roger son, Henry S. £ Grace S. 

Rolfe, Edward § Stephanie 

Rollins, J. Leslie 

Rollins, James L., Jr. § Norma 

Rood, Jane 

Rooney, Edward D. $ Elizabeth M. 

Rooney, Stuart A. § Anne E. 

Rosane, Richard C. § Marjorie B. 

Rose, James £ Glenys W. 

Rosen, Joseph § Pearl S. 

Rosen, Paul $ Annette 

Rosenblum, John W. § Carolyn J. 

Rosenwald, Harold § Betty Booth 

Ross, Paul F. & Rita M. 

Ross, William C. S Marian L. 

Rossiter, Selina G. 

Rossoni, John P. § Paola M. . 

Row, Ronald 

Row, Ronald V. $ Jane E. 

Rowe, Lawrence L. § Mildred M. 

Rowe, Standish S. 

Roy, Nancy C. 

Roy, Shirley I. 

Rub is sow, George John 

Rudnick, Mitchell K. $ Rosalie A. 

Rugo, Henry J. $ Faith W. 

Rural Land Foundation of Lincoln 

Russell, James D. § Marguerite M. 

Russell, Marie Hamilton 

Russell, Warren J. § Gail S. 

Russell, William B. § Anne H. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 16,200 


$ 1,001.16 


150 




9.27 




18,200 


1,124.76 




57,400 


3,547.32 




47,600 


2,941.68 




57,100 


3,528.78 




22,600 


1,396.68 




16,000 


988.80 


150 




9.27 




78,600 


4,857.48 




16,000 


988.80 




3,800 


234.84 




29,600 


1,829.28 




38,500 


2,379.30 




21,500 


1,328.70 




35,800 


2,212.44 




4,300 


265.74 




31,400 


1,940.52 




20,600 


1,273.08 




17,500 


1,081.50 




28,000 


1,730.40 




33,700 


2,082.66 




26,300 


1,625.34 




45,900 


2,836.62 




?1,900 


1,353.42 




21,400 


1,322.52 




55,500 


3,429.90 




50,000 


3,090.00 




33,100 


2,045.58 




31,900 


1,971.42 




45,400 


2,805.72 


20 




1.24 




35,300 


2,181.54 




5,600 


346.08 




54,700 


3,380.46 




16,500 


1,019.70 




14,300 


883.74 




28,100 


1,736.58 




45,200 


2,793.36 




48,000 


2,966.40 




34,200 


2,113.56 




23,800 


1,470.84 




41,300 


2,552.34 




20,700 


1,279.26 




67,300 


4,159.14 



219 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Russes, Richard P. S Mary D. 

Ruyle, Sheila B. 

Ryan, Alice E. 

Ryan, Frank A. 

Ryan, Helen E. 

Ryan, Est. of James J. § Helen 

Ryan, William H. § Mary B., Trs. 

Ryan, William F. $ Helen M. 

Ryer, Russell E. § Margaret C. 



Sabbag, Arthur § 
Salmon, Walter J. 
Sandy Pond Trust 
Sartor i, Louis R, 
Sartori, Louis R. 



Evelyn J. 
£ Marjorie B. 



§ Ruth M. 



Satterfield, Charles N. § Anne P. 

Savage, Orrin T. & Helen A. 

Sawtell, Clement C. $ Adelaide I. 

Sayre, Woodrow W. § Edith W. 

Schaal, Albert A. & Zelpha M. 

Schechter, Joel R., Trustee 

Scheff, Benson H. & Betty Jane 

Scheuer, Harry $ Catherine N. 

Schildbach, Muriel 

Schliemann, Peter C. $ Diane Page 

Schmidek, Henry H. § Mary L. 

Scholz, Mary A. 

Schumacher, John 

Schwann, William § Ai re-Mai j a 

Schwartz, Judah L. $ Ellen A. 

Scott, Bruce R. 

Scott, Bruce R. § Anne M. 

Scott, Eleanor B. 

Seaver, John D. 

Seaver, John D. $ Millicent 

Sedgwick, Harold Bend 

Seeckts, E. William 

Seeckts, E. William $ Eleanor R. 

Seeckts, E. William $ Eleanor R. J 

Stout, Caroline W. 
Sel fridge, Oliver G. 
Sell and, James 01 av § Maija 
Semerjian, Evan Y. & Barbara N. 
Senders, John W. & Virginia L. 
Seville, Alfred R. § Joan E. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 19,300 


$ 1,192.74 




20,200 


1,248.36 




24,700 


1,526.46 




13,900 


859.02 




14,100 


871.38 




21,300 


1,316.34 




84,600 


5,228.28 




38,500 


2,379.30 




28,000 


1,730.40 




18,100 


1,118.58 




40,300 


2,490.54 




85,000 


5,253.00 




600 


37.08 




38,400 


2,373.12 




41,800 


2,583.24 




27,900 


1,724.22 




35,100 


2,169.18 




5,100 


315.18 




400 


24.72 




51,100 


3,157.98 




37,900 


2,342.22 




32,900 


2,033.22 




27,300 


1,687.14 




28,400 


1,755.12 




36,100 


2,230.98 




50,000 


3,090.00 




100 


6.18 




40,100 


2,478.18 




32,800 


2,027.04 


550 




33.99 




62,100 


3,837.78 




24,400 


1,507.92 


150 




9.27 




41,800 


2,583.24 




35,900 


2,218.62 


100 


28,300 


1,755.12 




50,900 


3,145.62 




800 


49.44 




28,300 


1,748.94 




16,900 


1,044.42 




40,400 


2,496.72 




43,200 


2,669.76 




30,900 


1,909.62 



220 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Sexton, Maurice J. § Martha S. 

Shambaugh, Joan D. 

Shamsai, Javid 

Shansky, David 5 Nettie 

Shapiro, David $ Esther 

Shapiro, L. Dennis £ Susan R. 

Sharpe, John G. § Jeanne B. 

Shea, William J. 

Shea, William J. $ Margaret T. 

Sheer, Richard B. § Sara Jane 

Sheldon, Mary W. 

Shepard, Gardner D. § Mary Macy 

Shepherd, Henry L. , III, § Diana R. 

Shuman, Mark D. § Lena M. 

Silva, Mary E. 

Silverstein, Fred P. £ Mary J. 

Simms, Hugh P. § Margaret J. 

Simonds, Anthony J. 

Simonds, Lena J. 

Simourian, John $ Lillian M. 

Sisson, John H. £ Barbara B. 

Skinner, Louis T. 

Slayter, Henry S. 

Smith, Alan B. £ Marjorie B. 

Smith, Arthur D. § Jean C. 

Smith, Carl D. £ Florence C. 

Smith, Converse B. § Nellie L. 

Smith, Harold Dean $ Elizabeth H. 

Smith, John E., Trustee 

Smith, Peter S. $ Linda J. 

Smith, Steven 

Smith, Sumner 

Smith, William J. & Barbara J. 

Smulowicz, Bronislaw $ Sawera 

Smyth, Robert R. S Adella C. 

Snelling, Charles A. 

Snelling, Howard § Elizabeth J. 

Snelling, Jessica 

Snelling, John R. 

Snelling, John R. $ Jacquelyn H. 

Snelling, Norman J. § Carolyn R. 

Snider, Greta W. 

Society for the Preservation of 

New England Antiquities 
Sokolowski, Jeanne 
Solar, Barry $ Judith M. 



$ Hope J. 
2nd, S Elizabeth M. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 18,800 


$ 1,161.84 




26,300 


1,625.34 




5,300 


327.54 




30,400 


1,878.72 




40,700 


2,515.26 




50,200 


3,102.36 




50,900 


3,145.62 


150 




9.27 




21,100 


1,303.98 




87,100 


5,382.78 




23,600 


1,458.48 




45,500 


2,811.90 




16,500 


1,019.70 




38,200 


2,360.76 




72,300 


4,468.14 




16,700 


1,032.06 




18,300 


1,130.94 




18,800 


1,161.84 




1,900 


117.42 




42,500 


2,626.50 




48,400 


2,991.12 




106,100 


6,556.98 




25,400 


1,569.72 




44,500 


2,750.10 




30,500 


1,884.90 




22,500 


1,390.50 




48,500 


2,997.30 




26,800 


1,656.24 




16,900 


1,044.42 




100 


6.18 


150 




9.27 




100,800 


6,229.44 




21,600 


1,334.88 




32,000 


1,977.60 




32,300 


1,996.14 




17,200 


1,062.96 




20,600 


1,273.08 




43,100 


2,663.58 




24,900 


1,538.82 




33,400 


2,064.12 




24,500 


1,514.10 




7,100 


438.78 




19,200 


1,186.56 


100 




6.18 




45,500 


2,811.90 



221 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Solomon, Arthur P. $ Marilyn N. 
Southack, Theodore L., Jr. $ 

Marion B. 
Spencer, Henry W. § Marguerite G. 
Spindler, James W.. 5 Mary B. 
Spock, Michael f T Judith W. 
Spooner, Frederick C. £ Sarah W. 
Spooner, Lily T. 

Spreadbury, Peter E. $ Roberta I. 
Squibb, E. Frank 
Squibb, Mildred G. 
Squire, James R. £ Barbara L. 
Stam, Allan C., Jr. $ Kathleen 
Standish, Myles, Jr. & Hester T. 
Stankard, Charles E., Jr. § Jean C. 
Stanley, Francis E. 5 Suzanne R. 
Stanzler, Alan L. & Margaret 
Stason, William B. & Susan B. 
Stathos, Charles A. $ Margaret M. 
Stebbins, Herbert A., Jr. § Patricia 
Steczynski, John M. § Jennepher T. M. 
Steele's. Auto Body Repair, Inc. 
Steinhilper, Frank A. § Anne C. 
Stetson, John H. $ Faith F. 
Stevens, Edmund, Jr. § Shari R. 
Stevenson, Howard H. § Sarah W. 
Stevenson, John P. § Patricia A. 
Stewart, Francis J., Jr. $ Ruth L. 
Stratford Realty Co., Inc. 
Street, Earle B. $ Janet H. 
Striker, William W. $ Marjorie B. 
Sturgis, Alanson H. , Jr. § Anne H. 
Sugar, Peter C. d, Elizabeth R. 
Sullivan, Gladys G. 
Sullivan, Jay M. $ Mary S. B. 
Sussman, Joseph § Henri-Ann 
Sutherland, Robert L. $ Ann F. 
Sutton, Emmet t A. $ Barbara L. 
Swan , Edmund 

Swan, Edmund d, Eleanor G. 
Swanson Pontiac, Inc. 
Swanson Road Realty Trust 
Swartz, Eli § Jeanette U. 
Sweeney, Carl F. 

Sweeney, Carl F., Jr. $ Alice P. 
Swift, William N. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 29,900 


$ 1,847.82 




49,500 


3,059.10 




53,000 


3,275.40 




38,100 


2,354.58 




26,400 


1,631.52 




17,000 


1,050.60 




20,400 


1,260.72 




44,000 


2,719.20 


100 




6.18 




9,900 


611.82 




53,500 


3,306.30 




48,500 


2,997.30 




29,600 


1,829.28 




55,200 


3,411.36 




43,900 


2,713.02 




30,400 


1,878.72 




53,400 


3/300. 12 




55,500 


3,429.90 




21,600 


1,334.88 




19,900 


1,229.82 


200 


38,000 


2,360.76 




51,400 


3,176.52 




8,000 


494.40 




7,200 


444.96 




117,100 


7,236.78 




36,900 


2,280.42 




29,600 


1,829.28 




16,100 


994.98 




41,800 


2,583.24 




20,100 


1,242.18 




22,700 


1,402.86 




55,800 


3,448.44 




17,000 


1,050.60 




29,400 


1,816.92 




47,500 


2,935.50 




30,900 


1,909.62 




28,800 


1,779.84 


100 




6.18 




25,100 


1,551.18 


1,500 




92.70 




89,600 


5,537.28 




17,500 


1,081.50 


150 




9.27 




40,500 


2,502.90 


250 




15.45 



222 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Swift, William N. $ Phyllis C. 
Swinconeck, Est. of John J. § Sophie 
Sykes, David F. 5 Margare.t P. 
Sylvia, Lawrence M. $ Barbara L. 



Tarky, Vincent T. 

Tarky, William J., Jr. 

Taschioglou, Kemon P. § Rhoda K. 

Tat lock, Jane 

Tat lock, Richard § Jane F. 

Taunton-Rigby, Roger § Alison 

Taylor, Edward S. 

Taylor, Frederick B. $ Lex H. 

Taylor, W. Royce d, Dorothy V. 

Teabo, Prince C. § Elizabeth T. 

Tead, Eleanor K. 

Telling, Irving § Jane Cushman 

Tenneco, Inc. - Tennessee Gas 

Pipeline Co. Division 
Terrell, John H. § Mary H. 
Tetreault, Arthur Hubert $ Anne G. 
Tetreault, Claire F. 
Tew, John B. 

Thiessen, Arthur E. § Laura 
Thomas, George W. , Jr. $. Jane C. 
Thomas, Peter A. $ Muriel M. 
Thompson, Donald J. 
Thompson, G. Brooks, Jr. § Arlene 
Thompson, Lawrence 
Thompson, Lawrence E. 5 Dorothy A. 
Thomson, Anne Pearmain 
Tinder, Glenn § Gloria 
Tingey, William H., Jr. $ Ruth V. 
Tingley, Frederick M. $ Dilla G. 
Titus, William A. 
Todd, C. Lee, Jr., Evele.th R. , 

David 5 John 
Todd, Conrad H. 
Todd, Harriet B. 
Todd Pond Corporation 
Toksoz, M. Nafi $ Helena 
Toler, Louise C. 
Tong, Pin $ Siang Wen Chao 
Torode, Herbert L. 
Torode, Herbert L. § Lorraine S. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 35,900 


$ 2,218.62 




10,800 


667.44 




29,500 


1,823.10 




27,300 


1,687.14 




80,400 


4,968.72 




6,000 


370.80 




36,100 


2,230.98 


150 




9.27 




36,000 


2,224.80 




19,200 


1,186.56 




47,100 


2,910.78 




33,800 


2,088.84 




35,700 


2,206.26 




17,100 


1,056.78 




28,000 


1,730.40 




36,300 


2,243.34 


202,400 


1,000 


12,570.12 




19,200 


1,186.56 




16,300 


1,007.34 




33,500 


2,070.30 




66,400 


4,103.52 




54,700 


3,380.46 




17,400 


1,075.32 




27,800 


1,718.04 




48,900 


3,022.02 




25,500 


1,575.90 


200 




12.36 




47,100 


2,910.78 




19,200 


1,186.56 




38,900 


2,404.02 




38,500 


2,379.30 




24,000 


1,483.20 




13,200 


815.76 




20,300 


1,254.54 




24,600 


1,520.28 


150 




9.27 




29,600 


1,829.28 




6,400 


395.52 




20,600 


1,273.08 




23,500 


1,452.30 


100 




6.18 




18,200 


1,124.76 



223 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Torti, Maurice L., Jr. § Nancy H, 
Touborg, Jens N. F. § Margaret B, 
Tracey, Elizabeth M. 
Tracey, Robert J. 
Tracey, Robert J. $ Caroline J. 
Tracey 1 s Service Station, Inc. 
Travers, Paul § Bernice 
Trevelyan, Eoin W. § J. Ann 
Troisi, Ferdinand L. $ Mary G. 
Tunnel 1, Raymond W. $ Suzanne D. 
Turner, Charles F. § Winifred A. 
Turner, James R. S Mildred B. 
Turner, Mildred 

Turner, Vernon D. § Merry lees K. 
Tyler, Ethel A. 
Tyler, Heirs of Watson 
Tyler, Ralph S. § Cheryl Lee 



Ullrich, Robert C. 5 Sonia 
Umbrello, Carmel V. 
Umbrello, Francis § Virginia 
U. S. Dynamics Realty Trust 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 31,900 


S 1,971.42 




126,400 


7,811.52 




27,200 


1,680.96 




32,200 


1,989.96 




54,900 


3,392.82 


850 




52.53 




37,900 


2,342.22 




32,700 


2,020.86 




13,700 


846.66 




36,400 


2,249.52 




15,400 


951.72 




25,900 


1,600.62 


100 




6.18 




31,200 


1,928.16 




10,400 


642.72 




11,100 


685.98 




21,500 


1,328.70 




21,100 


1,303.98 




20,200 


1,248.36 




25,300 


1,563.54 




3,200 


197.76 



Valley Pond Realty Trust 

VanBuren, Harold S., Jr. § Beatrice 

H. Barrett 
VanLeer, Hans 
VanLeer, 
VanLeer, 
VanLeer, 
Van Wart 

Venier, Ettore P 
Vercollone, Edmund S. § 
Vitale, Joseph A. 
Vockel, Virginia 



6,800 



420.24 



L. 

Hans L. § Mary K. 
R. Karl & Rachel D. 
R. Karl, Trustee 
Walter L. S Stephenia 
$ Mary E. 

Julia 



Wadsworth, Charles Y. $ Virginia D. 
Waible, Wendell J. S Florence E. 
Wales, Betty R. 
Wales, R. Langdon $ Ruth W. 
Wales, Roger S. $ Patricia R. 
Walker, John F. $ Joan McK. 



4,000 


247.20 


2,300 


142.14 


52,200 


3,225.96 


25,100 


1,551.18 


43,900 


2,713.02 


20,000 


1,236.00 


61,900 


3,825.42 


23,300 


1,439.94 


28,000 


1,730.40 


17,800 


1,100.04 


54,800 


3,386.64 


27,900 


1,724.22 


35,300 


2,181.54 


37,800 


2,336.04 


24,100 


1,489.38 


38,400 


2,373.12 



224 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Walker, Sidney A. 

Walkey, Frederick P. 5 Ruth 

Wallwork, Edwin N. § Janice C. 

Walter, Charlton M. § Rosly M. 

Walton, Frank E. § Julie 

Wang, An $ Lorraine C. 

Warburg, Jonathan F. 

Ward, Thomas D. $ Jane L. 

Ward, Walter B. $ Sophie E. 

Ward, Walter B., Jr. $ Marie L. 

Warner, Charles D. K. § Patricia R. 

Warner, Estate of Henrietta S. 

Warner, John B. & Barbara K. 

Watts Realty Corporation 

Waugh, John S. 

Weathers, Audrey S. 

Webster, David § Winifred W. 

Weckstein, Richard § Muriel 

Weibel, Eugene A. $ Wilma 

Weiss, Alfred D. § Anne K. 

Welch, Vernon F. $ Leatrice June 

Weller, Maria F. 

Wells, George § Katherine W. 

Wenger, Jeffrey J. £ Alice H. 

Wengren, Margaret L. 

Westcott, Vernon C. § Mary Alice 

Whalen, William B. $ Mary E. 

What ley, Robert B. 

What ley, Robert B. § Kay A. 

Wheeler, Jeanie N. § Shepard, 

Gardner D. § Mary Macy 
White, Benjamin V., Ill, $ Elizabeth 
White, John R. & Gina R. 
White, Katharine S. $ John W. 
White, Robert E. § Marion J. 
Whitman, Lawrence W. $ Joanne S. 
Whitman, Ross $ Virginia R. 
Wilbor, John S. § Dorothy B. 
Wiley, G. Arnold § Helen P. 
Wilfert, Fred J. $ Eleanor M. 
Willemin, Julian V. & Jane A. 
Williams, Edwin L. , Jr. & Ruth D. 
Williams, Irving C. $ Elvira F. 
Williams, William G. 
Williams, William G. § Jane C. 
Williamson, Elizabeth R. 



100 



150 



41,700 
38,300 
27,700 
48,300 
17,400 
90,600 

6,000 
21,300 
18,700 
16,600 
59,400 
49,100 
35,100 

3,900 
41,800 
72,500 
54,100 
41,300 

6,400 
50,800 
17,500 
38,100 
45,600 

4,200 
70,200 
22,400 
16,200 

20,400 

5,400 
20,600 
48,100 
59,000 
28,500 
42,000 
65,700 
31,500 
14,000 
21,600 
22,100 
32,500 

3,800 

23,100 
15,500 



2,577.06 
2,366.94 
1,711.86 
2,984.94 
1,075.32 
5,599.08 

370.80 
1,316.34 
1,155.66 
1,025.88 
3,670.92 
3,034.38 
2,169.18 

241.02 
2,583.24 
4,480.50 
3,343.38 
2,552.34 

395.52 
3,139.44 
1,081.50 
2,354.58 
2,818.08 

259.56 
4,338.36 
1,384.32 
1,001.16 
6.18 
1,260.72 

333.72 
1,273.08 
2,972.58 
3,646.20 
1,761.30 
2,595.60 
4,060.26 
1,946.70 

865.20 
1,334.88 
1,365.78 
2,008.50 

234.84 

9.27 

1,427.58 

957.90 



225 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Willmann, Werner S. § Margaret M. 
Wilson, Donald H. § Cheryl L. 
Wilson, Eleanor L. 
Wilson, Elizabeth § Flaherty, 

Anthony J. 
Wilson, Mary Ann 
Wilson, Robert A. $ Judith A. 
Winchell, Gordon D. 



Winchell, 
Winchell, 



Gordon D. 
Gordon D. 



Enid M. 
Love, 



Dorothy W., Trs. 
Winchell, Gordon D. $ Keevil 



S., Jr. 

Guilbert 
Guilbert 



Charles 
Winchell, 
Winchell, 
Winship, Lee 
Winship, Lee C. 
Winship, Thomas 
Winship, Thomas 
Winthrop, John 



§ Amy Jane 



& Joyce L. 

$ Elizabeth C. 
i Barzun, Roger 



Trs. 
A. 



Witherby, Thomas H. & Marianne J. 

Withey, Edward L. 5 Barbara H. 

Wo f ford, John G. 

Wofford, John G. $ Joan W. 

Wollmar, Dick J. £ Mary Lou 

Woo, Way Dong § Emily T. 

Wood, George A., Jr. § Nancy S. 

Wood, Est. of James D. & Ruth E. 

Wood, Est. of 0. Chester § Hilve V. 

Wood, Ralph V., Jr. § Virginia S. 

Wood, Robert C. § Margaret B. 

Wood, Robert M. £ June W. 

Woodington, W. Gordon § Mary L. 

Work, Frederic C. T. § Marilyn N. L. 

Worsham, Jack L. § Charlotte A. 

Worthington, Thomas K. § Elizabeth C. 

Wright, Kevin D. 

Wright, Mai or § Ruth Vaughn 

Wright, Shirley B. 

Wu, Pei-Rin $ Susan 



Yagjian, Jacob § Inez 
Yavne, Raphael 0. $ Sarah 
Yeuell, Kay M. & Suzanne R 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 28,700 


$ 1,773.66 




2,900 


179.22 




28,900 


1,786.02 




24,400 


1,507.92 




19,000 


1,174.20 




9,500 


587.10 


4,250 




262.65 




61,500 


3,800.70 




17,300 


1,069.14 




46,600 


2,879.88 


300 




18.54 




21,600 


1,334.88 


300 




18.54 




29,600 


1,829.28 


300 




18.54 




61,500 


3,800.70 




53,000 


3,275.40 




60,000 


3,708.00 




26,300 


1,625.34 


100 




6.18 




33,300 


2,057.94 




25,900 


1,600.62 




53,200 


3,287.76 




25,900 


1,600.62 




19,800 


1,223.64 




19,000 


1,174.20 




5,400 


333.72 




45,700 


2,824.26 




37,700 


2,329.86 




29,800 


1,841.64 




45,100 


2,787.18 




40,300 


2,490.54 




25,700 


1,588.26 


150 




9.27 




29,000 


1,792.20 




21,500 


1,328.70 




32,100 


1,983.78 




2,000 


123.60 




22,900 


1,415.22 




38,300 


2,366.94 



226 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1974 



Yore, 


George P. 


§ Kathleen 


Yos, Jerrold M. 


5. Ann B. 


Young, 


David B. 


§ Cora S. 


Young, 


Estate o 


£ Edward L. 


Young, 


Lee A. § 


Jane C. 


Young , 


Lucy J. 




Young , 


Sara 





Zevin, Robert B. § Anne H. 
Ziegler, Elmer H. $ Hilda M. 
Zimmerman, Herbert E. § Pearl S. 
Zuelke, Laurence W. § Nancy J. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 15,000 


$ 927.00 




25,900 


1,600.62 




17,500 


1,081.50 




21,300 


1,316.34 




24,100 


1,489.38 




34,800 


2,150.64 


150 




9.27 




39,800 


2,459.64 




20,600 


1,273.08 




200 


12.36 




19,500 


1,205.10 



227 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Archer desCognets 
William T. King 
Richard F. Schroeder 



ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1974 $ 3.07 
Interest income in 1974 $103.56 

Less credited to this account in 1973 in error 32.00 71.56 

$ 74.63 

Less bank interest allowed to accumulate 63.56 

Cash balance at December 31, 1974 $ 11.07 

Cash and Securities at December 31, 1974 

First National Bank of Boston $ 11.07 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 1,226.13 

1,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 10/1/83 1,000.00 

$ 2,237.20 

Accumulated income $1,012.15 

Principal 1,225.05 

$ 2,237.20 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 

Cash Account 

Interest income received in 1974 $ 65.18 

Paid to Town of Lincoln 65.18 

B ank Deposits at December 31, 1974 

Middlesex Institution for Savings $ 722.00 

Cambridge Savings Bank 495.52 



$ 1,217.52 



228 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 



Cash Account 










Cash balance January 1, 1974 






$ 


587.86 


Income received in 1974 - interest, net 


$ 8,405 


86 






- Elsie Pierce Trust 


3,138 


07 






- Codman Trust 


1,334 


23 






- Fees for use of the 










Pierce House 


6,295 


00 




19,173.16 


Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 






$" 


6.60 
19,767.62 


Payments per order of Selectmen: 










Medical assistance to needy townspeople 








2,871.73 


Well-Child Clinic 








250.00 


Pierce House expenses: 










Repairs 


5,075 


60 






Supplies 


709 


16 






Caretaker compensation 


3,285 


00 






Gas 


2,526 


06 






Other utilities 


617 


07 




12,212.89 


Mowing, Pierce Park grounds 








1,705.68 


Rubbish removal 








115.25 


Miscellaneous 








33.87 


Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 








521.20 




31, 1974 




$" 

$ 


17,710.62 


Cash balance December 31, 1974 


2,057.00 


Cash and Securities at December 




Restricted as to principal: 






Union Warren Savings Bank 






$ 


378.30 


10,000 Federal Land Banks 4 3/8% 4/21/75 








9,925.00 


10,000 International Bank for Reconstruction 4 


1/2% 2/1/82 




9,975.00 


21,000 Federal National Mortgage 6.40% 12/11/87 








20,081.25 


10,000 Federal National Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 








9,900.00 


10,000 Southern California Edison Co. 7 1/8% 1/15/94 






10,000.00 


10,000 Ohio Power Co. 5% 1/1/96 








9,975.00 


5,000 Southern New England Telephone 5 3/4% 11/1/96 






5,000.00 


10,000 Florida Power § Light Co. 6% 12/1/96 








10,000.00 


10,000 Pacific Gas § Electric Co. 4 5/8% 6/1/97 








10,000.00 


10,000 American Telephone & Telegraph 4 3/4% 6/1/98 






10,000.00 


10,000 Duke Power Co. 7% 2/1/99 








10,000.00 








$115,234.55 


Unrestricted: 










First National Bank of Boston 








2,057.00 


Middlesex Institution for Savings 








4,263.85 


Provident Institution for Savings 








5,791.69 


5,000 International Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/4% 1/15/79 




4,904.56 



229 



5,000 American Telephone & Telegraph 4 3/8% 4/1/85 $ 4,856.00 

1,000 Virginia Electric 4 1/8% 10/1/86 1,015.35 

3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power Co. 3 5/8% 5/1/86 2^913.75 

4,000 Federal National Mortgage 6.40% 12/11/87 3,825.00 

5,000 Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4 3/8% 8/15/88 5,071.32 

2,000 Federal National Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 1,980.00 

$151,913.07 



DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1974: 

a/c Codman Barn project - First National Bank of Boston $ 670.87 

- N. E. Merchants National Bank 533.95 

a/c D. Gordon Recreation Fund, N. E. Merchants National Bank 466.05 

1,670.87 

Codman Barn account 

January 1, 1974, balances, as above 670.87 

533.95 



Donald Gordon Recreation Fund account 

January 1, 1974 balance, as above 

1974 interest income 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premiums 

Deduct - safe deposit box rent 

- bank interest allowed to accumulate 



1,204.82 



Drawn from savings banks (including interest 

accumulated of $192.63) 18,215.25 

19,420.07 

Payments for lumber and supplies, carpenters, 

concrete blocks, etc. 15,824.03 

$ 3,596.04 

Payments to Town of Lincoln, in accordance with 

Article 23 of 1974 Annual Town Meeting $ 3,596.04 





$ 


466.05 






268.54 


ims 




1.52 




$ 


736.11 


$ 2.00 






29.56 




31.56 



Cash balance at December 31, 1974 $ 704.55 

Cash and Securities at December 31, 1974 

First National Bank of Boston $ 704.55 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 570.96 

1,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 10/1/83 1,000.00 

1,000 American Tel. § Tel. Co. 4 3/8% 4/1/85 1,000.00 

1,000 Virginia Electric & Power Co. 4 1/8% 10/1/86 1,015.25 

230 



1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 4 1/2% 2/15/90 $ 1,002.91 

1,000 Federal National Mortgage Association 7.05% 6/10/92 990.00 

$ 6,283.67 



Accumulated income $ 1,075.25 

Principal 5,208.42 



1,265.44 
72.77 



DeCORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1974 $ 65.45 

Interest income in 1974 1,265.44 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premiums 7.32 

$ 1,338.21 

Deduct : 

Safe deposit box rent $ 2.00 

Paid to Town of Lincoln, 1974 net income 1,263.44 

Cash balance at December 31, 1974 $ 

Cash and Securities at December 31, 1974 

First National Bank of Boston $ 72.77 

Cambridge Savings Bank 397.99 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 1,553.76 

1,000 American Tel. $ Tel. Co. 2 3/4% 10/1/75 948.30 

3,000 International Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/4% 1/15/79 3,013.59 

2,000 U. S. Treasury 3 1/2% 11/15/80 1,950.47 

3,000 Southern Bell Tel. 4% 10/1/83 3,019.66 

1,000 Idaho Power Co. 4 1/2% 1/1/87 1,000.00 

2,000 Federal National Mortgage Association 6.40% 12/11/87 1,912.50 

1,000 Pacific Tel. § Tel. Co. 4 3/8% 2/15/88 1,006.40 

2,000 General Telephone Co. of California 4 1/8% 3/1/88 2,009.96 

1,000 Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 5% 6/1/89 1,001.54 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 4 1/2% 2/10/90 1,002.91 

4,000 Federal National Mortgage Association 7.05% 6/10/92 3,960.00 

2,000 Southern New England Tel. 5 3/4% 11/1/96 2,004.18 

$ 24,854.03 



231 



LINCOLN LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1974 
Income received in 1974: 

Codman Fund 

Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth Fund 

Alice Downing Hart Floyd Fund 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 

John H. Pierce Library Fund 

George Russell Fund 

Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 

George G. Tarbell Fund 

George G. 5 Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 

C. Edgar § Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 

Lincoln Library Fund 

Additional Cannon donation for the DeNormandie 

Room 
Withdrawn from savings bank account 

Payments: 

Safe deposit box rent 

Purchase of books for the DeNormandie Room 

Purchase of books for the general Library 

Jean Tenander, Librarian, Pierce Fund income 

Deposited in savings bank 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 

Cash balance at December 31, 1974 



909.49 



32.00 

33.69 

33.73 

8.46 

63.61 

29.82 

161.80 

152.27 

901.34 

81.30 

63.36 



3.00 

65.84 

992.85 

63.61 

700.00 

430.56 



1,561.38 

200.00 

70.00 

$ 2,740.84 



2,255.86 
$ 485.01 



Codman Fund 



Income on 
Deposit 



Middlesex Institution for Savings $ 142.97 



Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth Fund 
Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 



150.64 



Principal 
$ 474.59 
500.00 



Total 



$ 617.56 



650.64 



Alice Downing Hart Floyd Fund 
Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 



151.34 



500.00 
158.89 



651.34 



158.89 



John H. Pierce Library Fund 

1000 So. New England Tel. 5 3/4% 

1996 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 



1,000.00 

114.57 

1,114.57 



1,000.00 

114.57 

1,114.57 



232 






George Russell Fund 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 

1000 Fed'l Nat'l Mortgage 

6.40% 12/11/87 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 



George G. Tarbell Fund 
1000 So. New England Tel. 

5 3/4% 1996 
1000 So. Bell Tel. 4% 1983 
1000 Western Mass. Electric Co. 

4 3/8% 1987 
Union Warren Savings Bank 

George G. 5 Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 
10,000 Duquesne Light Co. 

7% 11/1/99 
Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 



C. Edgar S Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 
1000 Fed'l Nat'l Mortgage 

Assoc. 6.40% 1987 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 



Lincoln Library Fund 

1000 So. New England Tel. 

5 3/4% 1996 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 



First National Bank of Boston 
Fund income 
Cannon donations 
Mackenzie donations 
Eaton donations 



Income on 
Deposit Principal Total 



248.98 



59.20 



$ 160.14 $ 415.74 $ 575.88 



956.25 956.25 

986.06 1,217.04 

1,924.31 2,173.29 



1,000.00 
1,000.00 

1,000.00 
138.38 



1,000.00 
1,000.00 

1,000.00 
197.58 



3,138.38 3,197.58 



- 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


4,057.84 


75.00 


4,132.84 




10,075.00 


14,057.84 




956.25 


956.25 


60.83 


273.52 


334.35 




1,229.77 


1,290.60 




1,000.00 


1,000.00 


113.85 


- 


113.85 




1,000.00 


1,113.85 


104.66 




104.66 




310.97 


310.97 




50.00 


50.00 




19.38 
$20,836.60 


19.38 


5,250.45 


$26,087.05 



233 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



Cash balance at January 
Income received in 



Cash Account 






lary 1, 1974 




$ 4,240.51 


974 - Dividends 


$ 406.40 




- Interest 


1,088.65 




- General appeal 






(108 donors) 


2,045.65 




- July 4 parking fees 


1,887.00 




- Codman Trust 


2,800.00 




- Old Town Hall Corporation 


1,500.00 


9,727.70 


amortize bond premiums 




.63 
$13,968.84 



Interest applied to 



Payments per order of Trustees: 
Balance of 1973-1974 grants: 

Jason M. Rugo, Washington University 
Kathleen Coan, Lesley College 
Barbara J. Dauplaise, Regis College 
Martha S. Davis, Bent ley College 
Patricia. Dean, St. Francis College 
Sally Ann Henderson, Carleton State College 
Thomas W. Janes, Harvard University 
Cynthia A. Korhonen, Smith College 
Dennis J. Mahoney, Boston College 
Margaret S. Page, University of Mass. 
Nancy R. Page, Westfield State College 
First portion of 1974-1975 grants: 
Jane Downing, New England College 
David C. Courtney, Merrimack College 
Mary Evelyn Toler, Forsyth Dental School 
Karen Mahoney, St. Joseph College 
Elizabeth Algeo, Framingham State College 
Daniel Ryan, for testing by Carroll School 
Sarah Outten, schooling in Norway 
Robert Gajewski, Fairleigh-Dickinson Univ. 
Jean Marie Murphy, Boston State College 
Richard deMont, Ithaca College 
Donna Manzelli, Fisher Junior College 
Printing and postage 
Mowing field for July 4 parking 

Safe deposit box rent 

Deposited in savings bank 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 



Cash balance at December 31, 1974 



2,425.00 



4,402.00 



166.26 

36.00 

2.00 

000.00 

394.23 






10,425.49 
$ 3,543.35 



234 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1974 

First National Bank of Boston $ 3,543.35 

Provident Institution for Savings 10,125.08 

1,000 Pacific Gas £ Electric Co. 5% 6/1/89 1,001.54 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 4 1/2% 2/15/90 1,002.91 

5,000 Ohio Power Co. 5% 1/1/96 4,987.50 

6,000 Southern New England Telephone Co. 5 3/4% 11/1/96 6,012.98 

80 shs. Diversified Mortgage Investors 2,370.29 

40 shs. Exxon Corporation 3,016.85 

100 shs. Northern Indiana Public Service Co. 2,973.63 

$35,034.73 






JANE HAMILTON POOR SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
Cash Account 






Reserve for balance of 1974-1975 grants $ 4,400.00 

Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 1,000.00 

Lincoln 4-H Horse Club Fund 1,770.00 

Ernest P. Neumann Memorial Fund 5,005.00 

General Fund 22,859.73 

$35,034.73 



Cash balance at January 1, 1974 
Interest income in 1974 

Deduct 

Safe deposit box rent 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 

113.64 

Cash balance at December 31, 1974 $ 19.64 





$ 


21.64 
111.64 




$ 


133.28 


$ 2.00 






111.64 







Bank Deposits at December 31, 1974 

First National Bank of Boston $ 19.64 

Concord Cooperative Bank 2,154.08 

$ 2,173.72 

Accumulated income $ 938.72 

Principal 1,235.00 

$ 2,173.72 



235 



BEMIS LECTURE FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1974 $ 3,574.19 

Interest income received in 1974 1,476.36 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premiums 9.40 

$ 4,059.95 
Payments per order of Trustees: 

Dr. Konrad Oberhuber $ 400.00 

Abbot Lowell Cummings 300.00 

Curtis Chapin (slides for same) 250.00 

Other lecture assistance 10.00 

Printing and postage 191.24 

$1,151.24 
Safe deposit box rent 3.00 

Deposited in savings bank 1,500.00 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 153.02 

2,807.26 

Cash balance at December 31, 1974 $ 1,252.69 



First National Bank of Boston $ 1,252.69 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 625.42 

Provident Institution for Savings 3,509.18 

3,000 American Tel. S Tel. Co. 4 3/8% 4/1/85 3,013.67 

3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power Co. 3 5/8% 5/1/86 2,913.75 

1,000 Virginia Electric & Power Co. 4 1/8% 10/1/86 1,015.25 

2,000 Idaho Power Co. 4 1/2% 1/1/87 2,000.00 

3,000 Western Mass. Electric Co. 4 3/8% 4/1/87 3,000.00 

1,000 Federal National Mortgage Assoc. 6.40% 12/11/87 956.25 

1,000 Idaho Power Co. 4 3/4% 12/15/87 1,006.90 

1,000 Alabama Power Co. 3 7/8% 1/1/88 1,000.00 

3,000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co. 4 3/8% 8/15/88 3,060.90 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 4 1/2% 2/15/90 1,002.91 

3,000 New England Power Co. 4 5/8% 11/1/91 3,029.09 

3,000 Federal National Mortgage Assoc. 7.05% 6/10/92 2,970.00 

3,000 Atchison Topeka § Santa Fe RR gen'l mortgage 4% 1995 3,000.00 

3 33,356.01 

Accumulated income 5 1,388.94 

General Principal 31,967.07 

$33,356.01 



236 













■ 




^ 



p~'. 





i! 



Financial Section & Warrant for the 
. 1975 Annual Town Meeting 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT 

of the 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 



1974 



Cover Design - Features the sign that 

marked the Hartwell Tavern 
Credit is due the Lexinqtoi 
Historical Society for 
preserving the sign and th< 
Minute Man National Park 
for photographing it. 



SLUMPFLATION 



Slumpflation is now endemic in all the big 
industrial countries, save perhaps Germany. 
They are dividing into two camps: "slumpecons,' 
where price stability is number one priority, 
and "inflatecons," where a rise in unemploy- 
ment is being resisted. America is a leading 
slumpecon; its output has fallen in three 
successive quarters, and there's worse to 
come. Britain, with France and Japan, is an 
inflatecon 

Eventually, the inflatecons will be forced to 
adjust to the slumpecons. As inflation rates 
in different countries increasingly diverge, 
the strain falls on trade accounts and foreign 
exchange rates.... 



From "Business -- Britain" 
The Economist (England), November 23, 1974 



REPORT 

of the 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 



1975-1976 Budget 

This year we have a new dimension to the budgeting process - reces- J 
sion. This new factor is illustrated by the recently announced Massa- 1 
chusetts unemployment rate of 9.9%. Double digit inflation of 10.3% ir 
the Boston area creates a dilemma of even greater magnitude. This re- 
cent phenomenon has been appropriately named "slumpflation". In light 
of the uncertainty as to the direction in which the federal and state 
governments are currently headed, the dilemma is all the more perplexing.) 
The only predictable outcome of slumpflation is that the majority of Lin- jl 
coin's citizens will feel the effect of declining real income in 197S 
brought about by both continued inflation and business recession. 

Given this unpleasant scenario, the Finance Committee, in October, 
recommended an expenditure guideline of an 8% increase in overall town 
expenditures. This guideline was recommended with a view toward the 
adequate implementation of the interdependent objectives of the town - 
i. e., preservation of open space, a reasonable level of town services, 
quality education, diversity of population and a tax rate consistent 
with the financial and economic circumstances impacting the town, its 
citizens and its loyal employees. If a transcending priority has 
emerged this year, it is serving the human needs of our town employees, 
who have felt the impact of inflation to a degree equal to, and perhaps 
greater, than the town's citizens. While our guideline was set with 
the expectation that it would probably not allow for the continuation of 
all existing programs on the scales previously conducted, nor for the 
maintenance of all employees' purchasing power, we believed it would pro- 
vide for a good balance between these aims and the interests of the Lin- 
coln taxpayers, particularly the less affluent, the young, the retired 
and yes, even the unemployed. 

The 1975-76 budget projects an increase in town spending of $171,967 
(excluding from 1974-75 the Chapter 90 highway appropriation and the 
Elementary School summer salaries for which there is no appropriation re- 
quired in 1975-76), or 4.5%. A summary of the budget is shown in Table 
1. This budget differs from budgets presented in previous annual 
Finance Committee reports in that, this year, the Elementary School bud- 
get is admittedly not final. As has been continually emphasized by the 
School Committee, the current budget includes only those "step" salary 
increases called for by agreement with the Lincoln Teachers Association, 
but does not include any additional increases which may result from the 
negotiations currently in process. Because these negotiations are still 
in the formative stage, it is not possible to finalize the figure at this 
time. However, it is anticipated that any requested increase in this 
budget would not materially affect the overall budget. For example, if 
the negotiated increase for the 1975-76 school year equals that granted 






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for the past school year, the school budget would increase by approximate 
ly $35,000. This would result in an increase in the overall town budge* 
of approximately $207,000, or 5.4%, as compared with the 4.5% shown in 
Table 1. The effect on the Elementary School budget would, however, -be 
more significant. It would increase approximately $155,500, or 10.0%, 
as compared with the 7.7% shown in Table 1. 

A closer examination of the detailed budget reveals the many hours 
that have been spent keeping non-essential increases to a minimum so thai 
necessary increases could be implemented. Even more important is the 
general agreement among town boards with the spirit of our guideline 
recommendations, in that great emphasis has been directed to the economic 
welfare of town employees. Other expenditures have been cut so that 
basic services can be maintained. Certainly the most dramatic effort 
was made by the Lincoln- Sudbury Regional High School Committee when they 
made their decision to cut their budget to the point of reducing some sei 
vices. Their no-increase budget, coupled with a downward adjustment of 
Lincoln's share of the total, has resulted in a reduction of $95,800 in 
our budget from last year's Regional School costs. This amount accounts 
for essentially all of the difference between the guideline and the bud- 
get. We believe this budget reflects an overall conscientious effort 
to control the rising costs of town government, while maintaining a good 
level of services for the town's citizens. 



Budget Comments 

In recommending a budget guideline, it has been the consistent 
practice of the Finance Committee not to attempt to set priorities for 
spending by the various town boards and agencies. While this approach 
differs from that employed by many other finance committees, our emphasis 
on overall budget control has proved effective in keeping the costs of 
town government at a level as reasonable as that produced in comparable 
towns. (See Exhibit 2.) However, it is to be expected that, in each 
annual budget, individual town board priorities will result in increases 
in certain segments of the budget exceeding our guideline. In order to 
keep the town's citizens advised, we have recently made it a practice to 
comment on those major categories which exceed our guideline. The cate- 
gories in the 1975-76 budget which exceed the guideline are as follows: 

1. Public Safety (11.6% increase) 

The primary causes for the increase arise from the Fire 
Department and Building Inspector's accounts. The in- 
crease in the Fire Department results from an anticipated 
increase in the Department's workload in connection with 
the Bicentennial and more expenditures for equipment, re- 
pairs and maintenance. The increase in Building In- 
spector's fees results from the workload imposed by new 
state laws increasing inspection requirements. Higher 
building inspection fees charged to applicants for in- 
spections are expected to cover this increase. 






2. Elementary School Budget (8%+ increase) 

While the elementary school budget increase is 7.7% before 
salary negotiations, it is reasonable to assume that, as 
noted above, it will exceed our 8% guideline after salary 
negotiations. While salaries are the principal cuase of 
the increase, there are other significant items, such as 
Chapter 766 special education costs. It should also be 
noted that with the school population expected to drop 
another 5% to 794, the per pupil cost increase will be sub- 
stantially greater than 8%. 

3. Vo-Tech School (52.0% increase) 

The introduction of a second class into the Minuteman Re- 
gional Vocational -Technical School is the prime cause for 
the increase in this account. Although the number of Lin- 
coln students attending this school next year is anticipated 
to double, the per pupil costs remain high because of the 
high plant and overhead costs for a half- full school. While 
it is anticipated that the per pupil costs should continue 
to decrease until the school is full, it appears that this 
cost will remain above the costs of our other school systems, 
primarily because of the higher cost of vocational and tech- 
nical educational programs. 

4. Library (19.2% increase) 

The increase in the library budget results primarily from 
more than normal salary increases based on three factors: 
a) extraordinary increases, over and above what might be 
considered a normal level, in order to bring salaries in 
line with comparable libraries; b) an anticipated increase 
in the workload resulting from the Bicentennial celebration; 
and c) a planned increase in Library hours from 52 to 59.5 
hours per week. 

5. Recreation (23.4% increase) 

The primary cause for the increase in this account is addi- 
tional staffing for the summer day camp. These costs will 
be offset by increasing fees charged to campers. 

6. Unclassified (20.6% increase) 

Higher costs for existing employees' benefits - pensions 
(up 29%) and medical insurance (up 20%) - account for the 
increase in this budget. While rate increases of this 
magnitude are difficult to swallow, it is not possible to 
avoid them without substantially reducing the benefits, 
which we would not recommend. 



7. Reserve Fund (21.2% increase) 

Because of the uncertainties of the economy, energy and the 
cost effects of the Bicentennial celebration, the Finance 
Committee has increased the Reserve Fund in the 1975-76 bud- 
get. While the increase is large in comparison to the size 
of the Fund itself, it is really insignificant in comparison 
to the overall Town budget. The purpose of this increase 
is to avoid the necessity to have each department allow for 
contingencies in its budget, while at the same time avoiding 
special town meetings because of minor budget overruns. 



We have prepared Table II to present graphically the allocation of 
our funds as reflected in the budget for 1974-75 and 1975-76. In addi- 
tion, we have analyzed the 1966 budget in the same manner to show the 
longer range picture of town operations. As can be seen from this table 
the distribution of expenditures has not changed much during this period, 
and, in fact, no department has changed its relative position by more thai 
1.5%. However, in using this analysis, one must remember that it does 
not reflect the variance in population of the various segments of the 
town. Indeed there is a considerable divergence in increase (decrease) 
in the size of the population served in the areas of the schools and the 
total town as shown below. 



1975-6 


1974-5 


1966 


1 year 


10 years 


5,000 


5,000 


4,600 


— 


8.7% 


795 


828 


1,043 


(4.0%) 


(23.8%) 


402 


390 


303 


(3.1%) 


32.7% 



Population Served % Change 



Total Town 

Elementary Schools 

High Schools 

Note: For purposes of Table II and this schedule, the two 
regional schools have been combined for 1975-6 and 
1974-5. 

It can be seen from this schedule, while overall expenditures for 
the various segments have not changed, the per person costs differ more 
radically. The increase in expenditures, adjusted for population changes 
is illustrated in Exhibit 3. 

1975-76 Tax Rate 

As shown in Exhibit 1, we estimate that the 1975-76 tax rate will 
be $63.30, an increase of $1.50, or 2.4%. While we cannot, at this 
time, provide an exact estimate, we believe it is a reasonable one based 
upon our present knowledge, and on the assumptions that the new state ad- 
ministration will not have had enough time to make any significant changes 
in the "cherry sheet" distribution formula, that the "Sudbury Tax Case" 



TABLE II 
BUDGET ALLOCATION 
1975-76 



Elementary 
School 
42.1% 



High 

Schools 

17.5% 





VVS. Public Safety J 

\\ N. 10.1% / 


\ ^^ Debt / / 
\{ Service / / 

\ 7.7% / / 


\ YpublicN. / 
\ \ Works x. / 
\ \ 6.7% J 


\s/ 5.0%/ 
General ^^* < *L / 
Government ***s ' 


\ 4 . 9% \ yS 

\ L^^^^Unclassif ied 


Other 
3.1% 


Library 
2.9% 



1974-75 



1966 




Gen 
Gov, 

5.0% Other Library 
2.8% 2.6% 




Gen. 
Gov. 

4.1% Other Library 
3.7% 2.3% 



Unclass. 
3.4% 



decision will have no effect in 1975-76, and that the State's economic 
situation will not force an added burden on local property taxpayers. 



tte 

fie 

ti: 



Financing Our Objectives 

We continue to emphasize the interrelation and the interdependence 
of various town objectives, their mutual benefits and their conflicts. 
The balancing of these objectives, providing services and the human needs 
of both taxpayers and town employees is essential to the continued health 
of the Town. We believe that the citizens of Lincoln have every right 
to expect the delivery of high quality services in keeping with the town 
objectives. Second, we believe that town agencies should expect support, 
financially and otherwise, to 1 carry out their functions. Third, we be- 
lieve that the cost of providing services and meeting objectives should 
not constitute an undue financial burden on the less affluent members of 
the community. Fourth, we believe we should provide for the human and 
financial needs of our loyal town employees. The direction of a co- 
ordinated effort in any time is difficult, but in today's climate is a 
monumental task. 

We chose the word "slumpflation" to describe today's economic cli- 
mate because we think it does the job best. If we look beyond the simple 
definition, at the beginning of this report, we see uncertainty at the in- 
ternational level, confusion at the national level, chaos at the state 
level, and alarm at the local level. While most of us cannot have much 
of an impact at the international, national, or state level, we can have 
an impact at the local level. The Finance Committees in our neighboring 
towns of Concord and Weston have each concluded that their tax rate will 
double within the next six years unless they substantially change their 
course. While our current course does not indicate a similar conclusion 
there is no doubt that constant vigilance will be required to avoid seriou 
problems. 

Clearly, the solution is in maximizing the use of our effort and 
money. The two key elements in effecting this solution are: 

1) Controlling overall town spending 

2) Controlling the allocation of financial resources 

Exhibits 2 to 4 show the record in these two areas over the past 10 
years. Certainly our record of controlling overall spending, as re- 
flected by the tax rate, has been good when compared with other towns. 
The only question is: Is it good enough? The record of allocation of 
resources proves only that our priorities have not changed. The only 
question is: Should we change our priorities? 

The answers to these questions do not lie in the hands of any one 
group, but in the hands of all the citizens. We have been able to solve 
our problems in the past, but there is little likelihood that they will 
get smaller and none that they will go away. We must, as a Finance Com- 



mittee, as citizens, as taxpayers, as town officials, continually strive 
for a more coordinated approach to the attainment of town objectives, the 
efficient provision of high quality services, and the needs of all our 
citizens and employees. 



John Ehrenfeld 

William C. Munroe, Jr. 

Ann Sutherland 

William G. Williams, Jr. 

Arthur L. Coburn, III, Chairman 

THE LINCOLN FINANCE COMMITTEE 



EXHIBIT 1 
ESTIMATED 1975-76 TAX RATE 

own budget (Warrant Article 5) $ 3,993,000 

ther warrant articles 125,000 

Dtal warrant appropriations $ 4,118,000 

Linds available to offset against appropriations: 

1) Free cash - 7/1/74 

2) Met co funds 

3) Federal revenue sharing funds 

4) Receipts in lieu of taxes 

5) Other 

Dtal warrant articles to be paid by taxation 

Dunty, MBTA and State assessments: 

1) County 

2) MBTA 

3) State 

Dtal expenditures to be raised by taxes 

ther sources of funds: 

1) State and local aid funds 

2) Motor vehicle excise tax 

3) Others (net) 

)tal to be raised by taxation 
;timated property valuation (1/1/75) 
>timated tax rate (per $1,000 assessed value) 



1200,000 
50,000 
52,000 
20,000 
21,000 




343,000 




$ 


3,775,000 


210,000 
65,000 
30,000 




305,000 




$ 


4,080,000 


645,000 

200,000 

40,000 




885,000 




$ 
$! 

$ 


3,195,000 




;o, 500, 000 




63.30 



10 



EXHIBIT 2 

COMPARATIVE TAX RATE INCREASES 
1966-1975 



Equalized Tax Rate % Increase 



Wellesley 

Way land 

Sudbury 

Weston 

Concord 

Lincoln 

Lexington 



The equalized tax rate is computed by dividing the town's actual tax levy 
by the full market assessed value, which is computed biennially by the 
state for determining "cherry sheet" assessments and distributions. Al- 
though the precision of the state's valuation computation has been ques- 
tioned often, we believe that it has sufficient precision that the rela- 
tionships of tax rates and the trends during the period reflect a true 
picture. 



1974-5 


1966 


(Decrease) 


$35.50 


$25.10 


41.4% 


39.10 


33.20 


17.8% 


37.60 


33.60 


11.9% 


34.60 


31.90 


8.5% 


37.50 


37.80 


( 1.3%) 


27.80 


28.90 


( 3.8%) 


38.70 


43.60 


(11.2%) 



11 



EXHIBIT 3 
INCREASES IN EXPENDITURES FOR MAJOR DEPARTMENTS 
(ADJUSTED FOR POPULATION CHANGES) 
1966 - 1975/6 



1966 Expenditures = 100 




1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974/5 1975/6 

School populations are the average pupils per calender year for the 
years 1966-1973. 



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23 



WARRANT 
1975 NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
the legal voters of said Town of Lincoln qualified to vote in Town 
Meeting for the transaction of Town Affairs to meet in the Brooks 
School Auditorium in said Lincoln on Saturday , the twenty-ninth day 
of March next, at 9:30 a.m., then and there to act on the following 
articles, except Article 1 , and also to meet at the Fire and Police 
Building on Monday, the thirty- first day of March next at 7:30 a.m. 
then and there to act on the following Article 1, by posting a copy 
of this Warrant, by you attested, in said Town, seven days at least 
before the twenty-ninth day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Monday, March thirty- 
first, will be opened at 7:30 a.m. and will be closed at 8 p.m. 



ARTICLE 1 . To bring in their votes for one member for each of 
the following offices: 

Moderator for three years 

Town Clerk for one year 

Selectman for three years 

Treasurer for one year 

Assessor for three years 

Collector of Taxes for two years 

Two School Committee members for three years each 

24 



Water Commissioner for three years 

Board of Health member for three years 

Cemetery Commissioner for three years 

Planning Board member for five years 

Commissioner of Trust Funds for three years 

Trustee of Bemis Fund for three years 

Trustee of Lincoln Library for two years 

Director of DeCordova and Dana Museum for four years 

Recreation Committee member for three years 

Tree Warden for one year 

Note: Included as part of the Annual Town Election 
will be an election of two members for three 
years each to the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
District Committee 

and to act on the following question: 

"Shall licenses be granted in this town for the 
operation, holding or conducting a game commonly 
called Beano?" 



ARTICLE 2 . To bring in their votes for any committees, commis 
sioners, trustees, and other officers required by 
law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 3 . To hear and act upon the reports of Town Officers, 
Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 4 . To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 

elective officers of the Town and to determine 
whether any Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to 
employ for additional compensation any of its members and to fix 
additional compensation of such members. 

Selectmen 
25 



ARTICLE 5 . To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 

expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee 



ARTICLE 6 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 

Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of 
the financial year beginning July 1, 1975., in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and 
to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to 
renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than 
one year, in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, 
as amended. 

Selectmen 






ARTICLE 7_ . To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 

Selectmen and the School Committee to continue the 
Town's annual contract with the U. S. Commissioner of Education to 
operate the elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, Mass- 
achusetts, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee and Selectmen 



ARTICLE 8 . To see if the Town will vote to support the School 

Committee in its continuing plan to bring a limited 
number of children from Boston to the Lincoln Schools for purposes 
of education, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 



ARTICLE 9 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the School 

Committee to transfer funds within the Elementary 
Schools Budget voted under Article 5 of the Warrant for the 1974 
Annual Town Meeting: namely, transfers from line items TRANSPORTA- 
TION, INSTRUCTION and ADMINISTRATION -to line items OPERATION $ 

26 



MAINTENANCE, ACQUISITION OF FIXED ASSETS and PROGRAMS WITH OTHER 
SYSTEMS; provided, however, that the total funds so transferred 
shall not exceed $42,000, and the total expenditures shall not 
exceed the total Elementary Schools Budget so voted under said 
Article 5, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 



ARTICLE 10 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 

Bylaw of the Town of Lincoln by adding a new para- 
graph to Section XI B of the Bylaw, which section deals with the 
powers of the Board of Appeals, authorizing said Board, upon the 
request of the Selectmen with the approval of the School Committee, 
to grant special permits allowing part or all of any school build- 
ing owned by the Town and not needed for educational purposes to be 
used for any of the Uses Permitted in a B-l Retail Business Dis- 
trict, as provided in Section V B 1 of the Bylaw, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 



ARTICLE 11 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

a sum of money to provide kitchen and toilet facili- 
ties and accessory facilities such as septic systems, in the Codman 
barn complex on land owned by the Town, acquired from Roger B. Tyler 
and Benjamin T. Fawcett, Trustees under the will of Ogden Codman, 
pursuant to the vote under Article 5 of the Warrant for the Special 
Town Meeting held on June 16, 1970, and to determine whether such 
sum shall be raised by taxation, by transfer of available funds, by 
borrowing, by gift, or by any combination thereof, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General 

Bylaws of the Town of Lincoln by striking out Section 
5 of Article II entitled "Town Meetings" and inserting in place 
thereof a new Section 5 substantially as follows: 



27 



" Section 5 . The number of voters necessary to 
constitute a quorum at any Town Meeting shall be 
100, provided, however, that a number less than 
a quorum may from time to time adjourn the same. 
This section shall not apply to such parts of 
meetings as are devoted to the election of Town 
Officers." 



or take any other action relative thereto. 

Town Bylaws Committee 



ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the General 

Bylaws of the Town of Lincoln by striking out 
Section 5 of Article II entitled "Town Meetings" and inserting in 
place thereof a new Section 5 substantially as follows: 

"Section 5 . The number of voters necessary to 
constitute a quorum at any Town Meeting shall be 
100, provided, however, that a number less than 
a quorum may from time to time adjourn the same 
and provided that at the time of voting on any of 
the following questions the number of voters con- 
stituting a quorum shall be 8% of the number of 
voters eligible to attend the meeting as shown on 
the List of Registered Voters in use at the meet- 
ing: 

a. Any motion to amend the Zoning Map of the Town; 

b. Any motion authorizing the acquisition of any 
property by eminent domain without the consent 
of the owner thereof; 

c. Any motion to borrow money authorizing the 
issue of notes or bonds of the Town, other 
than a motion to borrow money in anticipation 
of the revenue and to issue notes therefor pur- 
suant to the provisions of General Laws, Chap- 
ter 44, Section 4, as amended; or 

d. Any motion to change this section of the General 
Bylaws. 



28 



This section shall not apply to such parts of 
meetings as are devoted to the election of Town 
Officers." 



or take any other action relative thereto. 

Town Bylaws Committee 



ARTICLE 14 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the General 

Bylaws of the Town of Lincoln by adding to Article 
II entitled "Town Meetings" a new Section 13 substantially as 
follows: 

" Section 13 . Before any Annual Town Meeting the 
Moderator may select from the Warrant those articles 
which in his judgment are likely to be adopted with- 
out debate and cause such articles and the motions 
to be made under each one to be published in a Con- 
sent Calendar, copies of which shall be sent by 
mail or otherwise to each household at least seven 
days before the date of such meeting. At an appro- 
priate time in the meeting, the Moderator may 
announce consideration of the Consent Calendar. 
Notwithstanding the provisions of Sections 6 and 9 
of this Article II, a motion is then in order to 
adopt the motions in the Consent Calendar as a 
group without debate. After seconding of the mo- 
tion the Moderator shall recognize any voter for the 
purpose of holding out any article and shall cause 
any article thus held out to be deleted from the 
motion to adopt. When all requests to hold out 
articles have been received, he shall put the motion 
as modified to a vote. Adoption of the motion by 
unanimous vote shall constitute adoption of all of 
the motions contained therein. Thereafter all 
articles held out, or if the motion to adopt is not 
voted unanimously, all articles in the Consent Cal- 
endar, shall be acted upon in accordance with the 
provisions of Sections 6 and 9 of this Article." 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

Town Bylaws Committee 



29 



ARTICLE 15 . To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 

Selectmen to submit an application to the Massachu- 
setts Historical Commission for the inclusion of the Codman Barns 
complex on the National Register of Historic Places, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 16 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the construction of a shelter near 
the Public Works building to be used to store salt and sand used in 
connection with the control of ice and snow conditions, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 17 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money not to exceed $200,000 by borrowing 
under the provision of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8 (5), as 
amended, to be used by the Water Department for any one or more of 
the following: 

a. Lining water mains in any one or more of 
Lincoln Road, Tower Road, Pierce Hill Road and 
the lane into the Pressure Reservoir from 
Bedford Road; 

b. Construction of an 8" or a 10" main in any one 
or more of Baker Bridge Road, Concord Road, 
Old Concord Road and Weston Road; and 

c. Connecting the existing main on Elementary 
School property to the main in Sandy Pond Road. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 



ARTICLE 18 . To see if the Town will vote to petition the Massa- 
chusetts General Court to enact legislation relative 



30 



•911 



to the granting of licenses by the Town for the sale therein of 
wine and malt beverages not to be consumed on the premises by caus- 
ing to be placed on the official Town Ballot to be used for the 
election of officers at the next Annual Town Meeting the following 
question: 

"Shall licenses be granted in the Town of Lincoln 
for the sale therein of wine and malt beverages 
not to be consumed on the premises" 

By Petition 



ARTICLE 19 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

a sum of money for the purchase of equipment for the 
use of the Public Works Department, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 20 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to equip the Bean pumper, the purchase 
of which was authorized under Article 10 of the Warrant for the 1974 
Annual Town Meeting, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

a sum of money for the replacement of the present - 
boiler at the Fire § Police Station, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 22 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

a sum of money for the replacement of the present 
emergency generator at the Fire § Police Station, including the con- 
struction of a generator shed, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectmen 
31 



ARTICLE 23 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public 

way the private road known as Page Farm Road, as 
shown on a plan entitled "Plan Showing Lot Layout for Page Farm", 
owned by Paul 0. Roberts, Jr., dated November 1, 1970, said plan 
being approved by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln 
December 16, 1970, and recorded in the Middlesex South District 
Registry of Deeds as Plan 85A of 1971, and for this purpose will 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, pur- 
chase or otherwise, the land contained therein, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, 

or transfer from available funds, a sum of money to 
be placed in a separate account in the town treasury, all as author- 
ized by Chapter 911 of the Acts of 1971, to be expended for the cel- 
ebration in the year nineteen hundred and seventy-five or nineteen 
hundred and seventy- six of the two hundredth anniversary of the 
American Revolution, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Lincoln 1975 Bicentennial Commission 



ARTICLE 25 . To see if the Town will adopt the following resolu- 
tion to amplify and implement the resolution adopted 
under Article 21 of the Annual Town Meeting held March 27, 1971: 

"RESOLVED: The Lincoln Affirmative Action Committee 
(formerly the Lincoln Equal Employment Opportunity 
Committee) shall have the responsibility to promote, 
directly or indirectly, by affirmative action, equal 
opportunity without discrimination on account of 
race, color, religious creed, national origin, sex, 
age, or ancestry in all areas where the legitimate 
interests of the Town of Lincoln may be affected, 
such as Town employment practices, Town contractual 
arrangements, local housing availability, Town 
education policies and other activities impacting on 
Town services." 



or take any other action relative thereto. 

Lincoln Affirmative Action Committee 
32 



ARTICLE 26 . To see if the Town will vote to convey all its right, 

title and interest in and to Nelson Road, which in 
the opinion of the Selectmen is no longer required for public pur- 
poses, to the United States of America or the appropriate department 
thereof for the use of the Minute Man National Historical Park for 
the sum of $1.00 and other valuable consideration, and to authorize 
the Selectmen to execute, acknowledge and deliver, in the name and 
on behalf of the Town, such deeds and other documents as they may 
deem necessary or desirable to carry out the provisions of this vote, 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 27 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

or transfer from available funds in the Treasury the 
sum of $28,154, or any other sum, for the construction and/or im- 
provements of town roads as requested by the Board of Selectmen, to 
be reimbursed by the Commonwealth under Chapter 765, Section 4, Acts 
of 1972, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 28 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

or transfer from available funds in the Treasury the 
sum of $24,000, or any other sum, for the construction and/or im- 
provements of town roads as requested by the Board of Selectmen, to 
be reimbursed by the Commonwealth under Chapter 725, Section 4, Acts 
of 1974, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 29 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

a sum of money to be added to the funds appropriated 
under Article 13 of the 1974 Annual Town Meeting for the construction 
of a bicycle path on Codman and South Great Roads, and to transfer to 
the account established for such funds the unexpended balance of the 
funds voted to be appropriated for the Trapelo Road bicycle path 
under Article 1 of the Special Town Meeting held on May 15, 1972, 



33 



and under Article 11 of the 1973 Annual Town Meeting, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 30 . To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to 

continue the arrangements with the Lincoln Foundation, 
Inc., first authorized under Article 16 of the Warrant for the 1970 
Annual Town Meeting to lease the former Lunt and Campobasso houses 
on Tower Road now owned by the Town to moderate income tenants, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to 

enter into a contract with the Town of Concord to 
permit town residents to use the Concord sanitary land fill, and to 
appropriate a sum of money therefor, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 32 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate gifts of 

money and income received from use of conservation 
properties for the maintenance and improvement of conservation pro- 
perties, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Conservation Commission 



Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant with your doings 
thereon to the Town Clerk, at or before the time for the meeting 
aforesaid. Given under our hands this tenth day of February in the 
year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and seventy- five. 

Robert M. Gargill 
John B. Garrison 
Harold A. Levey 

SELECTMEN OF LINCOLN 
34